What's a new employee called that is on orientation

  1. I was writing a paper for a class in my BSN program and typed in orientee and the spellcheck said it wasn't a word, and I went to dictionary.com and same thing. I've always used that word for a person on orientation. So if it's not a word what should I use in my paper - right now I'm going to put "new hire" or "newly hired employee" but am open to suggestions.
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   ERNurse752
    I've always used orientee also. I'm not sure if it would matter for your paper or not, whether "orientee" is in the dictionary. I think a lot of medical lingo wouldn't be found there, even though they're accepted words within the profession.

    Or maybe trainee?

    Good luck with your paper...I hated writing papers!!!!
  4. by   christvs
    That's weird! At work I am called an "RN orientee." I guess you could say "new RN" or "new nurse" too.
  5. by   NRSKarenRN
    We use orientee too.

    Tried to find in English no luck! did see in French dictionary

    Found orienteer: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionar...y&va=orienteer
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    we call them Orientees.
  7. by   Jessy_RN
    I would go with Trainee.

    Good luck on the paper.
  8. by   Katnip
    We call them orientees or interns if they're getting an internship.
  9. by   nursemaa
    I would go with orientee because that's the most commonly used term. I've always stayed away from using "trainee" (that's my personal bias- I hate anything to do with the word "training" because it makes me think of dogs and potty training :chuckle ). I've also used the term "novice nurse" when discussing newly graduated nurses.
  10. by   Happy-ER-RN
    I have to say here just for the record that you don't "orientate" an orientee, you orient them. I think it's so funny how many people say "orientate."
  11. by   rn/writer
    Quote from Happy-ER-RN
    I have to say here just for the record that you don't "orientate" an orientee, you orient them. I think it's so funny how many people say "orientate."
    Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am a writer and editor in addition to being a nurse and the non-word "orientate" has always set my teeth on edge.
  12. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from rn/writer
    Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am a writer and editor in addition to being a nurse and the non-word "orientate" has always set my teeth on edge.
    Actually, orientate IS a word. It is an intransitive verb (an action word that does not have a direct object): http://m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?bo...y&va=orientate

    However, when speaking of orienting someone, it should become a transitive verb (an action word that does have a direct object, which in this case would be the person being oriented) and take the form of orient, rather than orientate.

    http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000344.htm

    So, while it may not be grammatically correct in its common usage, orientate is a word.

    Thus ends our English lesson for today.
  13. by   rn/writer
    I stand corrected. I don't think I've ever heard the correct usage and I've heard the IN-correct version fifty million times. Alert and orientated times three. Gahhhhh!

    Thanks for the additional information.
  14. by   RN4NICU
    Orientated times three?? :chuckle I have never heard that one. I have occasionally heard people say that they are orientating a new employee. That one makes my skin crawl.

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