What's a new employee called that is on orientation - page 2

I was writing a paper for a class in my BSN program and typed in orientee and the spellcheck said it wasn't a word, and I went to dictionary.com and same thing. I've always used that word for a... Read More

  1. by   OUBobcat94
    "Orientate" drives mp the wall too. :chuckle As in "I orientated with the IV team this week". Ugh!!

    So how would one use orientate in a sentence correctly then?
  2. by   rn/writer
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Orientated times three?? :chuckle I have never heard that one. I have occasionally heard people say that they are orientating a new employee. That one makes my skin crawl.
    Alert and oriented times three (or four in some settings) is an assessment of a patient's level of consciousness. Is the patient aware of person (who they are), place (where they are), and time (what day, month, year is it). Some assessments add a fourth component--the nature of their illness/injury or the reason for their visit.

    If my level of consciousness were ever in doubt and someone wondered how orientated I was, they might want to add a fifth element--awareness of proper word usage--after I roughed them up a bit.
  3. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from rn/writer
    Alert and oriented times three (or four in some settings) is an assessment of a patient's level of consciousness. Is the patient aware of person (who they are), place (where they are), and time (what day, month, year is it). Some assessments add a fourth component--the nature of their illness/injury or the reason for their visit.

    If my level of consciousness were ever in doubt and someone wondered how orientated I was, they might want to add a fifth element--awareness of proper word usage--after I roughed them up a bit.
    Oh, I know what oriented x 3 is. I just had never heard 'orientated' pop up in that particular context before.
  4. by   nursemike
    I had a job once that required periodic observation of skills, so people had to get "observated."

    I tend to refer to new people as orientals, but it hasn't gained wide acceptance, for some reason. Mind you, I'm not saying that nursing orientation is literally as arduous as the lives of Asian immigrants working on the transcontinental railroads were, but I think you have to admit, there are parallels.
  5. by   Psychtrish39
    hehehe funny and I agree as I just came off a terrible "orientation" I actually feel confused now not oriented,<----- is that a word? Actually better for us nurses when we are out on our own and using our own critical thinking skills.
    Orientation can sometimes be a great experience but usually is horrible at least my experiences with it...
  6. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from rn/writer
    Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am a writer and editor in addition to being a nurse and the non-word "orientate" has always set my teeth on edge.
    I completely agree - it is said alot around here. HOWEVER, it is in the dictionary.

    Grating nonetheless.

    steph

    edited to say . . . .I didn't read this second page before posting . . .. . .
  7. by   Thunderwolf
    It's interesting that we discuss new job orientation in parallel with patient orientation.

    Oriented to self--> You as a NEW nurse. The focus is on you, looking inward as you adjust being a newly licensed LPN/RN or a a new employee at this facility...and all that it means to you. Honeymoon phase.

    Oriented to place--> You in your environment. The focus is on where you work, the floor or your unit. Knowing where departments are and their functions. Knowing where items are located. Getting to know staff. Learning the facilities routines.

    Oriented to time--> You in your current state of readiness in practicing independently. Learning/improving upon clinical skills as a clinician. Learning how to structure your time (time management skills). How much time do I need in this orientation period in order to stand on my own two feet? What is my learning curve?


    Oriented to context--> You and "your current role" as a nurse. What is expected of me by my colleagues? What do I expect for myself? What are my expectations of my patients or my colleagues? What do I expect from my facility? What situations on the floor am I competent in to handle alone or need assistance? In a code, what is my role? If a patient dies, what is my role towards the family? How do policies and laws define who I am and how I am to perform in this situation versus the next?

    So, orientation is really an ongoing process that never really ends. Some folks are just more "oriented" than others.
  8. by   rn/writer
    Bravo, Thunderwolf. Excellent observations and right on the mark.

    To use your analogy, then, those who just don't get it would be disorientees.

    If there's anything I hate more than hearing "orientated," it has to be hearing "disorientated." Pthwaghh.

    Steph, it might be in the dictionary but it will never be a legitimate word to me. At least not in the way most people use it.

    Does anyone remember a scout badge called orienteering? I think it had to do with using a compass and maps and topography clues to figure out where you are. That could have some parallels, a la Thunderwolf, to the whole newbie thing. Maybe nursing students should have a quick course right before graduation on how to make the orientation process work for them. It would include such useful tidbits as "How to scope out unit politics," "Finding your place in the pecking order," and "Sucking Up: when is it just not worth the indignity."
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I, too, hate the word:

    Orientated. It sound just wrong, somehow.
  10. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I, too, hate the word:

    Orientated. It sound just wrong, somehow.
    And when used in the wrong context, it would make the new employee the 'orientatee'. Okay, now I am making up words.

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