What have other nurses done that have freaked you out?

  1. What has other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad.

    On my FIRST day as a LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I went in to see what was going on. She was having an anxiety attack and severe pain (post stroke). I pulled the call light, and no one came. Uggg.

    So I peeked out the door and saw my CNA walking down the hall, and told him to come sit with res. I went down to get her a xanax and a pain pill, well relief nurse was in restroom, and relief CNA (with call light still going off) was sitting behind nurses station reading a newspaper. I told CNA to tell nurse to get a xanax and pain pill for res. She said OK. I go to relieve my CNA. Said goodbye to him, and stayed with res. after 10 minutes, CNA COMES INTO ROOM WITH XANAX AND MORPHINE PILL. She is soooooo shocked to see me still there, she hands me the pills and RUNS to the relief nurse. I could NOT BELIEVE WHAT I JUST SAW!!!!

    (I did immediately call DON and tell what happened. Luckily, my CNA was still checking on another res, and saw whole thing.--------they got a slap on the wrist! that was it!!!)
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  2. 897 Comments

  3. by   allegory
    During my med-surg clinical an RN that I was watching went into a geriatric patients room who was just ordered new heart medication....dig. I believe and she explained to him what it was with her heavy oriental accent. The patient was hard of hearing and said he wasnt taking anymore pills. The nurse then yelled "but it for your heart!", the patient exclaimed he wasnt taking any damn pills and the nurse again yelled "but it for your heart". This happened three or four times until another nurse came in and explained to the patient what it was. I couldnt believe how the nurse handled that situation....I was simply shocked and steered clear of that nurse the rest of the day.
  4. by   leeae85
    It is so weird that this post is here-because i had one of these moments TODAY!

    This is my first week working for an agency, and today was my first day to one of the assignments that i will be doing quite frequently (a LTC facility). This morning, i was orientating with a nurse and we were doing the a.m. medpass, when a CNA called the nurse's name i was working with (we'll call her Jane..) So, Jane runs after the CNA & follows her into a patient's room ( & i follow too. ) The resident isn't breathing, but is making this weird snoring noise. So she starts doing compressions- in the middle of his STOMACH! I couldnt believe she didnt know where to do them! And she had been a nurse for at least 20 years! Well, in the end, they got the order for DNR (he was a full code). So they had to stop the CPR anyways. And the whole time me and another nurse we like, "let me take over." and she wouldnt let us!
  5. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from leeae85
    It is so weird that this post is here-because i had one of these moments TODAY!

    This is my first week working for an agency, and today was my first day to one of the assignments that i will be doing quite frequently (a LTC facility). This morning, i was orientating with a nurse and we were doing the a.m. medpass, when a CNA called the nurse's name i was working with (we'll call her Jane..) So, Jane runs after the CNA & follows her into a patient's room ( & i follow too. ) The resident isn't breathing, but is making this weird snoring noise. So she starts doing compressions- in the middle of his STOMACH! I couldnt believe she didnt know where to do them! And she had been a nurse for at least 20 years! Well, in the end, they got the order for DNR (he was a full code). So they had to stop the CPR anyways. And the whole time me and another nurse we like, "let me take over." and she wouldnt let us!

    Wow! I know we all have our moments, but I think it might be wise to "leave" a CPR book around for her! LOL. Sorry you had to go through that, but hopefully you will laugh about it later!
  6. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from allegory
    During my med-surg clinical an RN that I was watching went into a geriatric patients room who was just ordered new heart medication....dig. I believe and she explained to him what it was with her heavy oriental accent. The patient was hard of hearing and said he wasnt taking anymore pills. The nurse then yelled "but it for your heart!", the patient exclaimed he wasnt taking any damn pills and the nurse again yelled "but it for your heart". This happened three or four times until another nurse came in and explained to the patient what it was. I couldnt believe how the nurse handled that situation....I was simply shocked and steered clear of that nurse the rest of the day.
    my MIL is from Thailand. When we do not understand her she says "what? You no speak my language?", but to have a PROFESSIONAL address the situation like she did, I think I would stay clear of her too!
  7. by   geniann
    Besides just pulling a resident off the floor and putting them back in bed after they have fallen, then acting like nothing happened because they didn't want to do the paperwork- a few other things come to mind. While in nursing school, a "future nurse" :smackingf was "taking" a blood pressure with NO stethescope. I asked her what she was doing and she said "I just watch the needle jump and when it starts I get my top number and the last jump is my bottom number" I almost died! ( and perhaps her patients will too with that genious taking care of them!) She didn't even say "diastolic and systolic" pressure. I have also seen 2 nurses give IV atibiotics 6 hours late and knew it and did nothing to rectify it- the one said "I was too tired" and the other said "I couldn't read the MAR". What is wrong with people nowadays!!
  8. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from texas_lvn
    (I did immediately call DON and tell what happened. Luckily, my CNA was still checking on another res, and saw whole thing.--------they got a slap on the wrist! that was it!!!)
    It greatly helps to place one's self in the shoes of the CNA, especially a LTC CNA. I work at a nursing home, and each one of my CNAs is assigned 12 to 15 patients each. They simply do not have the time to sit with one patient for an extended period of time when there are other call lights that need to be answered in an expedient manner.

    In addition, most LTC facilities suffer from high employee turnover and attrition rates, so the DON usually won't bestow severe punishments upon lazy staff members. The DON is just happy that a warm body has arrived to fill the necessary shift. In addition, there's typically not enough quality time for most LTC nurses and aides to devote to non-emergencies such as panic attacks and screaming. Few, if any, procedures are done by the book in LTC. You'll learn as you spend more time in your new LVN role.
  9. by   lovingtheunloved
    Quote from TheCommuter
    It greatly helps to place one's self in the shoes of the CNA, especially a LTC CNA. I work at a nursing home, and each one of my CNAs is assigned 12 to 15 patients each. They simply do not have the time to sit with one patient for an extended period of time when there are other call lights that need to be answered in an expedient manner.

    In addition, most LTC facilities suffer from high employee turnover and attrition rates, so the DON usually won't bestow severe punishments upon lazy staff members. The DON is just happy that a warm body has arrived to fill the necessary shift. In addition, there's typically not enough quality time for most LTC nurses and aides to devote to non-emergencies such as panic attacks and screaming. Few, if any, procedures are done by the book in LTC. You'll learn as you spend more time in your new LVN role.
    I'm a CNA in LTC. I would NEVER EVER put my hands on a medication, especially a narcotic. It is out of a CNA's scope of practice. What nurse would put herself at risk like that? Sheesh. And obviously, in this situation, they DID have the time to sit with the resident for 10 minutes, since the CNA was chilling at the station with the newspaper.

    As far as things that freak me out, I'm sure most of you have seen this, but I work with a nurse who, for the past 30 years, has recapped needles with her teeth. I shudder.
  10. by   MissJoRN
    ooohh, this is fun...

    at 0650, my 5 y/o post T&A started bleeding heavily, I told the oncoming RN when she arrived and again after report updated her. Then sat down to catch up on some charting. (In the meantime, of course I did what needed to be done.) Maybe it's just me but I would have made that kiddo a priority... not her, first she had to check fridge temp, then check syringe stock, etc. Never even glanced in his room. IU decided to quietly "linger" until the surgeon showed up.

    Homecare nurse mixing a pt (peds pt!!) Lasix elixir with her coffee to help lose weight!?

    Oh, I'm sure I've got more and better, but off to work now...
  11. by   Tweety
    A nurse crushed Percocets, mixed with water, and gave it through a central line IV.
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    I dont htink this nurse contacted the DON because the CNA's were sitting behind the desk while call lights were going off...I think she called because the CNA delievered the medication. While I agree with you that there is no time in LTC to be sitting with residents that are screaming . This patient was having severe pain and anxiety related to that pain, I would have sat with or had someone sit with that patient as well until all was relieved. I dont leave anyone alone with an acute onset of severe pain .. if I cant pinpoint the source of the pain..



    Quote from TheCommuter
    It greatly helps to place one's self in the shoes of the CNA, especially a LTC CNA. I work at a nursing home, and each one of my CNAs is assigned 12 to 15 patients each. They simply do not have the time to sit with one patient for an extended period of time when there are other call lights that need to be answered in an expedient manner.

    In addition, most LTC facilities suffer from high employee turnover and attrition rates, so the DON usually won't bestow severe punishments upon lazy staff members. The DON is just happy that a warm body has arrived to fill the necessary shift. In addition, there's typically not enough quality time for most LTC nurses and aides to devote to non-emergencies such as panic attacks and screaming. Few, if any, procedures are done by the book in LTC. You'll learn as you spend more time in your new LVN role.
  13. by   txspadequeenRN
    EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK K!!!!!!!

    Quote from Tweety
    A nurse crushed Percocets, mixed with water, and gave it through a central line IV.
  14. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from Tweety
    A nurse crushed Percocets, mixed with water, and gave it through a central line IV.
    OMG!!! :redlight:

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