Union, yes or no? - page 7

I am a new nurse and have recently heard that the nurses at my hospital are considering going union. It seems (at least on my unit) that the biggest issue is pay. Are any of you guys union and if... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    Howdy Ya'll
    from deep in the heart of Texas

    Here we go again -jt. Anurse who steals scripts, forges a prescription should have charges filed against her and her license removed.
    1. that nurse is a drug abuser
    2. that nurse is a thief
    3. that nurse is guilty of fraud.

    Yes, file charges against her, yes take her license away. Why not she herself is throwing it away.

    Use this rehab money from the state to attract and train new nurses. Ones who will treasure what they have earned. Get the drug abusers out of nursing.
  2. by   pickledpepperRN
    According to AA & HHS licensed nurses have the lowest rate of relapse when they ask for and complete treatment. I know of 2 RNs at different hospitals. I do not know their entire story but on had been convicted of DUI leaving a restaurant with her kids in the car. 2 1/2 years later she got her license back. NOW 12 years after that she is still a full time valued and very fine nurse.
    The other is still working after 22 years. She had been an IV nurse. Now works in ICU.

    I am much more disturbed by the sober (I think) RN who at 10:00 pm charted for the entire night, up to 6:30 am the next day! I called the supervisor to sho this charting, wrote my manager, and reported her to the BRN. She never came back to any hospitat I work at.
    One nurse became habituated to narcotic pain pills after an auto accident. Shw was in rehab before returning to work at a different hospital. She had been an adult ICU nurse and retrained to work in the NICU because her injury made lifting impossible.
    I don't think these are the situations you were writing about.

    As a nurse representative (steward in other unions) I attended a first step meeting. The newly hired manager had a printout of time clock records. There were about a dozen times in 6 months when this full time nurse clocked in between ONE and THREE minutes late. She was told she would be terminated for one more occurance. I was writing notes when the manager lost it. She stood up, turned red, fists clenched, kicked the trash can ove, and yelled. "You look just like the woman my husband left me for!"

    The union filed a grievance to get the write up out of her file. She transferred to another med/surg unit. As far as I know this manager has been fair to the other staff.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 24, '03
  3. by   pickledpepperRN
    To my knowledge the CNA does not make promises.
    RNs from contract facilities go talk about what they have.
  4. by   charissa
    This key element has been repeated numerous times in this thread, but it seems that many who are totally anti union in any event opinionated seem to keep skipping over it or ignoring it. * A proper nursing union IS NOT one that is organized by or most times even a member of a major or even state wide labor union. A real union that benifits pt's and nurses, and to my understanding most nursing unions at least in my area are started BY NURSES banding together, are made up of their NONPAID FELLOW EMPLOYEES as leaders, and are ASSISTED in legal issues by their STATE NURSES ASSOC! Is anyone listening? Teamsters and big labor have no real business pretending to rep nurses. WE REP OURSELVES regarding OUR CONCERNS about OURSELVES and PT SAFETY ! My hospital has been union 30 + years in that manner with NO strikes and a great relationship between management and Union and things work out well for all of us. I understand that they have pros and cons, but if a manager is unwilling to abide by our contract or address concerns I have somewhere else to go. And good nursing unions that are set up properly dont shield nurses who provide unsafe care or shouldnt be working, I have had 2 nurses fired within the last 4 months from my hospital because of care issues, they petitioned and were denied for justifiable reasons. Eveything has good aspects and bad aspects, unions are no different. Big commercial unions like the one I keep seeing referenced shouldnt be reping nurses, they do not have an obligation or ethical boundaries and their actions many times reflect that, nursing unions set up in the correct manner do because THEY ARE THE NURSES! Not some fat guy sitting behind a desk 100+ miles away collecting my $$. Also it is upsetting to see that many view union pay increases as nurses who dont deserve it getting paid more and more. That is a tad offensive, as I would argue that as a hard working dedicated nurse i have earned every raise I have every received as much as the next guy or gal.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    Charissa:
    THANK YOU!
    That is as it is and should be.
    The elected unpaid nurse leaders decide how to spent the dues money. In California the all RN union mambers pay about 1/2 what other unionized nurses make. We get better patient care language in our contracts. Where the staff work at it the staffing is much improved.
    The outgoing leadership got a ratio law passed. Many contracts have a ban on mandatory overtime. Staff is cancelled last over travelers and registry unless they request it.

    On pay:
    Quality nurses should get the pay increase without having to kiss up to management.
  6. by   pickledpepperRN
    SEIU people came knocking at my door trying to get me to sign a union card for a hospital I no longer work for.
    CNA does not go to homes or make phone calls without an invitation. If you are in California and someone does this ask for their name and call oe e- mail the CNA:
    http://www.calnurse.org/cna/np/np61998.html
    http://www.calnurse.org/cna/mem/
    http://www.calnurse.org/
    http://cna.igc.org/cna101/
  7. by   -jt
    <A proper nursing union IS NOT one that is organized by or most times even a member of a major or even state wide labor union. A real union that benifits pt's and nurses, and to my understanding most nursing unions at least in my area are started BY NURSES banding together, are made up of their NONPAID FELLOW EMPLOYEES as leaders, and are ASSISTED in legal issues by their STATE NURSES ASSOC! >

    Exactly. And they dont go to organize those nurses until the nurses themselves ASK them to & INVITE them to come. And when the nurses do ask, it is other staff nurses like US who go to talk to them & answer their questions about our NY state nurses assoc union & to show them our contracts & how it all works. They can compare our working situation as union nurses to what they have as non-union nurses & then make their own informed decision.

    I agree with you in the statement above - the best place for RNs is in an RN union run for by & RNs - but I wouldnt put a negative blanket statement down on all the trade unions that also represent nurses, though. Some are doing a good job. Some are even working closely with their state nurses assocs, as is happening in NJ now with the NJSNA & the nurses division of the teachers union.
  8. by   Gomer
    Originally posted by spacenurse
    CNA does not go to homes or make phone calls without an invitation.
    Sorry, Spacenurse, I must disagree with you. When CNA tried to unionize my hospital (about 1 1/2 years ago) they somehow got hold of home addresses and phone numbers. I received 2 "how the CNA will change your hospital" letters with promises to negotiate better rates and benefits and 3 phone calls. After telling the CNA person what I thought about her and her union the phone calls stopped. Also, I complained to the NLRB.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    I am sure it depends on the local. We have several campuses of our county hospital system. One has a very active group of nurses who accomplish wonderful advocacy. Another has terrific nurses who are not active in their union (a BIG one, not all RN). The facility where the nurses insist on advocacy do a lot, poor treatment and unfair discipline are common at the other campus. Nurses just quit rather than fight for honesty and quality care.
  10. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by Gomer
    Sorry, Spacenurse, I must disagree with you. When CNA tried to unionize my hospital (about 1 1/2 years ago) they somehow got hold of home addresses and phone numbers. I received 2 "how the CNA will change your hospital" letters with promises to negotiate better rates and benefits and 3 phone calls. After telling the CNA person what I thought about her and her union the phone calls stopped. Also, I complained to the NLRB.
    You could be right. I know it is not the policy. Glad you reported it. Glad she stopped when you told her to.
    CNA does send mailings. I have NEVER seen promises, but the history of past victories won at other hospitals seem like promises.

    Guess what? When two young people came to my house claiming to be the Sierra club and actually had SEIU cards I visited my friends at my former hospital. I was told of a tall blond woman who came to the house claiming to be CNA. I think I know there is no tall blond woman working for CNA in Southern California. This person also claimed to be an RN. Don't know who she is but if she is a CNA nurse we need to tell her this is NOT OK. She does not work for the CNA.

    The RN elected Board of Directors wrote rules telling staff to only call those who give their phone number at a meeting or by sending in a tear off form.

    Letters and information we sometimes send to all licensed nurses. That is how we got many many 10s of thousands of letters to prod the governor to sign the 'Whistle blower' and Safe Staffing laws.
    Back in the 1970s we got 1:2 ratios for ICU the same way.

    I am very sorry you had to put up with unwanted phone calls. No need to be sorry, you didn't disagree with me, just told me something I didn't know about. Never heard of CNA calling anyone who did not give their number. It could have happened. It could have been someone else claiming to be CNA.

    PS:
    I really do not know where you work. 1 1/2 years ago whatever election was held I don't know about.
    A very good hospital near the beach had an election with another union, not CNA about that time.

    Hope you didn't lose all your union supporters if 40% voted for the union. Perhaps those who left were the most vocal. Do you think it was peer rebuke, retaliation by management, or something else? I can't imagine accepting employment just to organize at a facility. I do work registry. Almost never talk about a union because I almost nebver get a break. I just work 24 hours a week at my CNA hospital for benefits and retirement. Work registry once a week if I feel like it because I am nosey. That is how I know the hospital that voted down a union that is not CNA is a good hospital.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 25, '03
  11. by   Bookie
    We are unionized (LA County). The union is very weak. In fact, it is the best friend the County ever had. The rep doesn't fight for you, she just agrees with whatever the county says. Can't speak for all unions, though.
  12. by   pickledpepperRN
    Originally posted by Bookie
    We are unionized (LA County). The union is very weak. In fact, it is the best friend the County ever had. The rep doesn't fight for you, she just agrees with whatever the county says. Can't speak for all unions, though.
    I have been told the same. County nurses did a great thing a couple years ago in exposing the deaths caused by no dialysis RNs being on call. I cut the article from the Times, but cannot post it.
    It did make me very proud of those nurses.

    I have gone to Big County and MLK through the registry. Worked hard with really good nursing and medical staff. One grouchy and one very fine clerk.

    We voted to keep the hospitals open. Now read that Rancho has more time to stay open, but High Desert is closing although it is always fully occupied with patients.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on May 25, '03
  13. by   pickledpepperRN
    Oh Gomer:
    I was reminded that possibly your co workers gave your phone number to an organizer. It is very possible the lady called you because she was asked to or told you were interested. After all you said you got no more calls after you said you didn't want them.

    VERY different from the two at my door. I had to close the door on them. They would not leave.

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