uniforms are killing us - page 21

What do you all think of current nursing wear. it kills me to go up to a adult floor and see RN's wearing all these crazy looking tops with cartoons and teddy bears on them. personally i see why some... Read More

  1. by   itiswhatitis
    Many nurses look like goofballs with their rediculously cutesy outfits, often have poor diction (discernably low class accents) and frequently use improper English (nursing professors are especially adept at this). When was the last time your physician called you "honey"? You might as well be at the local diner than the hospital. Nursing is a blue collar job...and will always be.. Sorry for the reality check.
  2. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from itiswhatitis
    Many nurses look like goofballs with their rediculously cutesy outfits, often have poor diction (discernably low class accents) and frequently use improper English (nursing professors are especially adept at this). When was the last time your physician called you "honey"? You might as well be at the local diner than the hospital. Nursing is a blue collar job...and will always be.. Sorry for the reality check.
    You fit write in,honey...
  3. by   luvmy3kids
    Quote from itiswhatitis
    Many nurses look like goofballs with their rediculously cutesy outfits, often have poor diction (discernably low class accents) and frequently use improper English (nursing professors are especially adept at this). When was the last time your physician called you "honey"? You might as well be at the local diner than the hospital. Nursing is a blue collar job...and will always be.. Sorry for the reality check.
    Blue collar job??? Are you kidding me???

    The last time my physician called me honey.... I was 6.
  4. by   crissrn27
    Quote from itiswhatitis
    Many nurses look like goofballs with their rediculously cutesy outfits, often have poor diction (discernably low class accents) and frequently use improper English (nursing professors are especially adept at this). When was the last time your physician called you "honey"? You might as well be at the local diner than the hospital. Nursing is a blue collar job...and will always be.. Sorry for the reality check.

    Are you kidding?
  5. by   EmilyUSFRN
    Quote from maia1212
    I think if anything the non nurses who are wearing scrubs should have to wear uniforms from uniform companies like they used to...like housekeeping, janitors, kitchen people. Or at least have some sort of identifier on the scrub with their dept of employment like the the above mentioned. So there is no confusion as to who is a patient care giver and who is not. Maybe if we brainstorm we can find a another way to differentiate us nurses from other staff.
    Thats exactly what my hospital does-- the janitorial staff have blue tops-- either polos or button down that have "housekeeping" embroidered on them, with the blue pants. transporters wear all black and has "transport" embroidered on it. dietary wears an outfit similar to what a motel housekeeper would wear, and it says "dietary". In the NICU and L&D, hospital issued green scrubs are required by everyone-- techs, RNs, residents, secretaries, MDs, so that's when it is VERY hard to tell people apart. Granted, everywhere else the PCTs, RNs and UC all wear whatever they want as far as pattern and color, the badge is ALWAYS worn no buts about it.
    Personally, I like the patterned tops. I do peds, but granted, even if I didn't I would still wear them but with discretion. And as an avid sports fan, I do wear bucs tops on Sundays, and my USF ones on Saturdays--when it's football season. That's who I am, and I think it makes me look like an individual, and then I have something to talk about as an icebreaker-- However, anything in excess is just plain tacky-- hairspray, perfume, jewelry, etc.
  6. by   dak26
    The color printed uniforms cheer up patients more then they offend. I wear colored,printed,and cartoon scrubs. I work on the oncology floor. My patients range from young to mostly elderly. Most pt elderly,some new diagnosis,some end stage cancer ,even in house hospice. I get compliments from all of my pt, and family.It does cheer them up. I have been told by my pt that they can't wait until I come in at night so they can see what I am wearing . They love the variety and the chance to see something fun rather than plain white nurse ratchet attire. Oh and they love all my crocks ,that cordinate with each different color scrubs and I also have jibbitz too.
  7. by   justme1972
    Quote from itiswhatitis
    Many nurses look like goofballs with their rediculously cutesy outfits, often have poor diction (discernably low class accents) and frequently use improper English (nursing professors are especially adept at this). When was the last time your physician called you "honey"? You might as well be at the local diner than the hospital. Nursing is a blue collar job...and will always be.. Sorry for the reality check.
    Considering all of the education that it requires to become a nurse, especially with advanced nursing, I have never considered it a blue-collar job. It may have been 75 years ago, but not anymore.

    White-collar jobs are not limited to working in a cubicle...blue-collar jobs are also jobs that you can get with only a high-school diploma or a GED...nursing most definitely doesn't qualify.
  8. by   reesern63
    Quote from Hopefull2009
    Considering all of the education that it requires to become a nurse, especially with advanced nursing, I have never considered it a blue-collar job. It may have been 75 years ago, but not anymore.

    White-collar jobs are not limited to working in a cubicle...blue-collar jobs are also jobs that you can get with only a high-school diploma or a GED...nursing most definitely doesn't qualify.
    Not necessarily. Why all the disdain blue-collar workers? Everyone is needed for all of us to get by. We should also have more respect for past generations of nurses, too.
  9. by   ranchwife
    I worked at a larger hospital located about 65 miles from where I am currently at and the uniform "code" depended on which department you were working!! OB had uniforms they changed into there at work that were provided for them......ICU wore black scrubs....med/surg nurses wore teal, navy, khaki or white and NO PRINTS!! Housekeeping wore an emerald green and respiratory therapy wore powder blue!! ER nurses were the only ones allowed to wear prints and different colors, but the administration said "This way, the patients know the nurses from the housekeeping staff" Now that I am "back home" at our little rural hospital, I can wear the prints again and the colors...nothing outrageous and long, painted or phony fingernails are strictly prohibited for nursing and laboratory staff!!!
  10. by   rn/writer
    Quote from ranchwife
    I worked at a larger hospital located about 65 miles from where I am currently at and the uniform "code" depended on which department you were working!! OB had uniforms they changed into there at work that were provided for them......ICU wore black scrubs....med/surg nurses wore teal, navy, khaki or white and NO PRINTS!! Housekeeping wore an emerald green and respiratory therapy wore powder blue!! ER nurses were the only ones allowed to wear prints and different colors, but the administration said "This way, the patients know the nurses from the housekeeping staff" Now that I am "back home" at our little rural hospital, I can wear the prints again and the colors...nothing outrageous and long, painted or phony fingernails are strictly prohibited for nursing and laboratory staff!!!
    My hospital did the color coding thing for years. Last year, they conducted a survey and found that the patients still had no clue who was whom. They scrapped the color coding and our facility exploded with color. In most ways, this has been an improvement. There are a few who push the envelope with bizarro prints and extreme shades, but, for the most part, we're all happier.

    As for professional appearance, each nurse has his/her own standards and is free to operate within them. I personally do not wear cartoons or anything that seems undignified, opting instead for plain colors or simple prints. HOWEVER, do not try to take away my clogs. Dignified or not, I love them because my feet no longer hurt. Whole 'nuther subject, but one that means a lot to me.
  11. by   Flare
    When i worked on the floor, i could only wear plain white. It was fine and i survived. When we were on the floor working doing a drug study or a private duty shift we could wear whatever. Often the patients would remark how nice it was to see a little color on the floor instead of all white.
    When my dad was a patient he had one nurse who wore printed tops and it really did make it a bit more cheerful.
  12. by   DarciaMoonz
    I like the printed uniforms. I would hate to have to wear the same boring uniform day after day. As long as they are like baseline states, neat, not wrinked and stained, then I don't think it is a big deal. Basically, I don't care what you wear as long as your doing your job. Besides, I think it's nice to be a little "loud" sometimes, especially after having to endure years of wearing those dreadful school uniforms
  13. by   RNDreamer
    My agency requires all HHAs to wear white...I hate it..I feel like I deliver milk all day

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