uh...CPR question

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    Hello!I must be overthinking,but all of a sudden found myself puzzled by the following:In the event of a respiratory arrest, do we start compressions? Or do we administer oxygen? I've googled this and have not yet found one definite answer..Mauve someone could share from experience?Much appreciated!
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  5. 4
    If the victim has a pulse, I think you go straight to rescue breathing. One breath every 5-6 seconds for adults or 3-5 seconds for infants and children. If no pulse then start chest compressions
    CallieNM, DTW90, SwansonRN, and 1 other like this.
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    Scrubmouse, you are correct. The whole point is to fill in what the patient doesn't have. If they aren't breathing, but have a pulse, then you only give rescue breaths. If they don't have a pulse as well; you do both. If you do compressions on someone who has a pulse, you can cause them to have a dysrhythmia.
    NewRN2008 likes this.
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    Respiratory arrest with pulse: rescue breathing once every 3-5 seconds infant/child, every 5-6 seconds adult. The ONLY pulse check is about 2 minutes after rescue breathing, if pulse keep breathing; no pulse start compressions. If you have the tools, BVM with supplemental O2 is preferred to pocket mask or BVM with no O2. Call 911/code team ASAP after establishing unresponsiveness.

    See slide #12, 17, 20; slide #30 for pedi here: http://www.choa.org/health-professionals/~/media/CHOA/Documents/Health-Professionals/Physician Resources/AHA_Update_2010.ashx

    You can also google "CPR algorithm"
    Last edit by JustBeachyNurse on Sep 16, '12 : Reason: added resource
    wish_me_luck likes this.
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    Remember, effective compressions can also make the lungs kick in, so you are not depriving the patient of oxygen. There is a little still in the body but it needs to circulate, which is why compressions are done first.
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    So you know the next question is always ... "There is no pulse, I am sure of that, but I can't tell if they are breathing, what should I do???" LOL
    JustBeachyNurse likes this.
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    Quote from netglow
    So you know the next question is always ... "There is no pulse, I am sure of that, but I can't tell if they are breathing, what should I do???" LOL
    Wouldn't you know that very question was asked at the class I took last week...I sat through a full class as the refreshers conflicted with my schedule. It was entertaining to say the least.
    netglow likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from ISRN
    Hello!I must be overthinking,but all of a sudden found myself puzzled by the following:In the event of a respiratory arrest, do we start compressions? Or do we administer oxygen? I've googled this and have not yet found one definite answer..Mauve someone could share from experience?Much appreciated!
    Like every other code starts....you assess non responsiveness, check for a pulse and respiration's, you call for help.

    If there is a pulse you begin rescue breathing (mouth to mouth) until the ambu (BMV...bag, mask, valve) arrives as per the AHA CPR recommendations. When you loose the pulse you begin CPR........with the exception of neonates and infants.
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    Administering oxygen won't do a dang thing if you don't supply ventilation to get it down to the alveoli and CO2 out (which is even more important).

    While it is now standard that if you are doing chest compressions for pulselessness, this is going to provide adequate ventilation, you would NOT do chest compressions for ventilation if there is a pulse--- cardiac compressions on a beating heart are not a great idea.
    KelRN215 likes this.
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    Give it enough time and resp will preogress to full blown cardiac too so just wait if you dont know
    Altra and netglow like this.


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