The title "NURSE" - page 2

Hello all, I had a debate with my brother, who is a 4th year med. student about the title nurse. My wife, who has her BSN and is Registered Nurse in the State of Georgia, obviously has... Read More

  1. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from omega17632
    once again, i am not questioning or degrading an LPN/LVN.

    Let's look at it like this... If you are driving down the road, and stumble across a serious car accident and you are let's say, an LPN, obviously you are bound to offer assistance. Now if the EMT's show up after you, and you present yourself as a "nurse",and that car accident goes to court, are you legally able to do that?


    Like I've stated before, I understand the clinical differences between an RN and an LPN and as you all are aware of if their scope of practice is not as broad as an RN's. I understand that both of them are respected professions, and that you have good and bad of both in those professions.

    My question is on a legal level, not a "I went to school to damnit, I am a nurse too!" As I also stated, the specifics of my debate are irrelevant.

    thank you,

    Omega
    I think when a question like this is posted it will bring up alot of issues that LPNs/LVNs/RPNs have had to deal with in regards to being recognized as nurses and as professionals. I worked as an RPN in Canada. According the Regulated Health Professions Act in Ontario, the title "nurse," "registered nurse," or "registered practical nurse" can only be used by members of CNO (College of Nurses of Ontario). Yes I could legally use the title "nurse." Despite this fact, I had to deal with managers, RNs, doctors, etc who did not view RPNs as "real" nurses, some did not even view them as nurses at all. The managers were the worst offenders when I worked as an RPN.

    Some states are very specific in regards to the actual title of "nurse," others are not worded as concisely. I currently work in Michigan as an RN and I do know that LPNs/LVNs can legally use the title "nurse," I am unable to find the exact legislature to post, but I have seen it and read it.

    What ever state your in Omega, there should be some legislature in regards to the use of the title "nurse," "LPN/LVN," and "RN." Just to be clear, I was neither upset or offended by your question.
  2. by   Tweety
    Quote from omega17632
    once again, i am not questioning or degrading an LPN/LVN.

    Let's look at it like this... If you are driving down the road, and stumble across a serious car accident and you are let's say, an LPN, obviously you are bound to offer assistance. Now if the EMT's show up after you, and you present yourself as a "nurse",and that car accident goes to court, are you legally able to do that?


    Like I've stated before, I understand the clinical differences between an RN and an LPN and as you all are aware of if their scope of practice is not as broad as an RN's. I understand that both of them are respected professions, and that you have good and bad of both in those professions.

    My question is on a legal level, not a "I went to school to damnit, I am a nurse too!" As I also stated, the specifics of my debate are irrelevant.

    thank you,

    Omega
    Yes, an LPN can say "I'm a nurse" anytime, anywhere, even at the scene of an accident.

    However, the nurse can only perform basic first aid and CPR, things that are covered under the good smaratin act, while awaiting profressional EMS. We can't just practice nursing on the street the same as we would in a hospital, like starting IVs, administering meds.

    If we are trained in CPR and basic first aid, and this is what we do, then legally no one can sue us for any outcomes. This goes for the man on the street and the nurse.
  3. by   sirI
    Quote from omega17632
    once again, i am not questioning or degrading an LPN/LVN.

    Let's look at it like this... If you are driving down the road, and stumble across a serious car accident and you are let's say, an LPN, obviously you are bound to offer assistance. Now if the EMT's show up after you, and you present yourself as a "nurse",and that car accident goes to court, are you legally able to do that?


    Like I've stated before, I understand the clinical differences between an RN and an LPN and as you all are aware of if their scope of practice is not as broad as an RN's. I understand that both of them are respected professions, and that you have good and bad of both in those professions.

    My question is on a legal level, not a "I went to school to ****, I am a nurse too!" As I also stated, the specifics of my debate are irrelevant.

    thank you,

    Omega
    Your question asked has been answered. No need to beat a dead horse.
  4. by   LEL
    Quote from siri
    Your question asked has been answered. No need to beat a dead horse.

    Amen as there is no need to continue this.
  5. by   realnursealso/LPN
  6. by   Altra
    Quote from omega17632
    once again, i am not questioning or degrading an LPN/LVN.

    Let's look at it like this... If you are driving down the road, and stumble across a serious car accident and you are let's say, an LPN, obviously you are bound to offer assistance. Now if the EMT's show up after you, and you present yourself as a "nurse",and that car accident goes to court, are you legally able to do that?
    The differences in scope of practice between RNs & LPNs are irrelevant for this part of your question.

    1. At least in my state, nurses are not bound to offer assistance at an accident scene. Many would choose to do so, and would have limited protection from liability under the provisions of the Good Samaritan laws.

    2. If you are licensed by your state as a nurse, then you are a nurse whether you are at work at the moment, offering assistance at an accident scene, in line at the grocery store, or at home in your living room.

    HTH
  7. by   prmenrs
    legally, what the state board of nursing has in the code is [legally] what counts.

    i can't figure out what else you might be asking. that is, unless you are just trolling???
  8. by   CV_LVN
    The bottom line is an LVN holds a license. The BON states an LVN has to be under supervision of RN, MD, dentist, etc but it does not have to be under direct supervision...they can be a phone call away. LVN's are responsible for their OWN actions as a nurse. Legally we carry our OWN license, take an NCLEX similar to the the RN's (NCLEX-PN and NCLEX-RN).

    LVN's and RN's have a legal responsibility to render aide in an emergency situation if no one else is present....i.e. car accident as you were stating. During this situation the LVN or RN is covered under the Good Samaritan Law, as long as they do what they have been taught and is in their scope of practice.

    Oh yeah and regarding whether LVN's are nurses or not....next time I'm starting your IV, hanging your Cardizem drip, giving you Dig or Cardizem IV push, or taking telephone orders from your doctor regarding your care, you better hope I'm a nurse!
    Last edit by CV_LVN on Oct 31, '05
  9. by   VivaLasViejas
    The question has been asked and answered, multiple times. I think it should be crystal clear by now that legally, an LPN/LVN may call her/himself a nurse because s/he IS a nurse.

    Closing this thread now, in the interest of stamping out and abolishing superfluous redundancy.:deadhorse

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