The importance of RN to BSN?

  1. I was wondering if anyone could offer some insight into the importance of going from RN to BSN right after graduating with an associate's degree in nursing? Do you think it's something I could put on the back burner for awhile and just get into learning the daily in's and out's of nursing? Or do you think it's important enough to start right away?
    I have also seen jobs requesting "BSN preferred" and was wondering if this will hurt me later on if I try to move around. I was also thinking of going for my CMSRN after 2 years. Any input would be appreciated.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    I'd certainly plan on getting it but the stress of getting through nursing school coupled with learning to be an actual nurse in the world is enough for awhile, don'tcha think?

    Give yourself a year or so to find your balance.
  4. by   Haunted
    I am a huge advocate for education and having that advanced degree will open many doors for you . However, nursing school is truly "boot camp" and once you are done with it, take the boards, start getting paid for what you have been doing for free and discover your options from there.

    Having that RN after your name is wonderful. You can always return to classwork and take online courses, there are many options. My advice, take your boards as soon as you graduate from your nursing school.
  5. by   nurz2be
    Quote from wasabiRN
    I was wondering if anyone could offer some insight into the importance of going from RN to BSN right after graduating with an associate's degree in nursing? Do you think it's something I could put on the back burner for awhile and just get into learning the daily in's and out's of nursing? Or do you think it's important enough to start right away?
    I have also seen jobs requesting "BSN preferred" and was wondering if this will hurt me later on if I try to move around. I was also thinking of going for my CMSRN after 2 years. Any input would be appreciated.
    I too am in an ASN program. I have my heart set on my BSN then MSN. HOWEVER, my mind is in ASN. I have been advised by several nurses who have pursued this same path to give myself at least 1 year to adjust to real nursing as opposed to being a student nurse. If after that year mark I feel comfortable and not anxious about my work load, then pursue the BSN. I have also been advised to be cautious of getting my MSN too soon as some jobs if you have your MSN and not enough "experience" you can be considered over educated under experienced. So, patience is a virtue. I was told to shoot for a 3-5 year plan for having obtained my Masters degree. That is an attainable goal and not placing myself under duress. Good luck with your studies.
  6. by   RN2Bn2006
    I took one semester off - to get accustomed to my new job. Because I still lacked a few general study pre-requisites - I started slowly, taking 2 classes a semester, including summer. Now I have just completed those, and will start the BSN online in January. I have felt a little stressed, but it was important for me to continue while I was still in the "study" mode. I feel it is helping me as a nurse - with the new things I have learned (I had to take pathopsyiology), and I feel good about myself also.

    It will all depend on how stressed out you are at work, and what your family dynamics are as to whether you can handle it or not. Everyone is different. I plan to eventually get my MSN, but may wait awhile. I do not want to spend all my children's young lives studying! That is a BIG negative. It would be nice just to have the weekends and days off doing things with them, as opposed to writing research papers.

    The positive thing is that most of your classes can be online. All of mine are - and I can set my own clinicals up.

    My advice is just to keep your goal in mind, and it doesn't matter if you do it immediately or not, just keep striving for your goal. You will eventually achieve those goals!

    Hope this helps

    Paula
  7. by   RNroseshea
    I graduated in May 2007 with an associate degree in nursing. I have already been researching RN-to-BSN programs as I now feel ready to go back to school this upcoming January. There are many nurses from my program who have already started on their BSN (this fall), after having graduated with me. My advice is to start when you feel ready again. I have been told by many that the RN-to-BSN courses do not have a clinical component and are not as stressful as it was for getting the ASN. Remember, the RN-to-BSN programs are designed for the working RN and you can go at your own pace.
  8. by   oldiebutgoodie
    It really depends on you. The first year of nursing is very stressful, so you may want to wait to get acclimated to being a nurse before starting on the BSN.

    The other option is to "keep on trucking", since you are already in study mode.

    Either option is fine. Do what works for you. However, don't let too much time pass until you start on the BSN. Many options open up for you when you get the BSN.


    Good luck to you,

    Oldiebutgoodie
  9. by   S.N. Visit
    I'm enjoying my new role as an RN. I will wait a yr. or two before going back. After being employed a full yr, my employer has offered to pay for RN-BSN bridge (pending contracts between my hosp. & local university.)
  10. by   Daytonite
    Hi, wasabiRN, and welcome to allnurses!

    You need time to learn to acclimate to being an RN. Then, when you go back to get a BSN you will be able to concentrate on the coursework and it will be more enriching for you. The BSN is going to enhance and deepen your knowledge, most likely, of leadership, patient management and communication skills. I went back for my BSN after being an RN for 8 years so I was able to focus on my studies. It was an awesome and eye-opening two years. And, the facility I worked for noticed the change in me because I got promoted to a supervision position almost right away when I graduated. And, let me tell you, those leadership and communication skills I learned in my BSN program really came in handy. While we did touch on these subjects in my ADN program, it was not to the depth and extent that we did in the BSN coursework.
  11. by   wasabiRN
    Wow, thanks for the great input. I appreciate it. Wonderful holiday to all.
  12. by   calliesue
    I think I would keep going to school, because to me it would be harder to go back then to just keep on going. Getting started going to school was the hardest part.
  13. by   jackson145
    A lot of the nurses at my hospital get their BSN online while they are working. Our hospital will pay for almost all of it if you are a full-time employee. Sweet!

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