Take this job and shove it, I ain't working here no more! - page 5

by Blue Roses

15,219 Views | 63 Comments

That was me three weeks ago. Since then, I have sought help in counseling, have started medication through my doctor, applied for several jobs, and have gotten a few job offers. TODAY, I accepted a job offer at an inpatient... Read More


  1. 0
    I just thought of something. OP why did you not have your doctor give you an excuse and take a leave of absence. Also I wanted to add this, Nursing is a bitxx some days. When I leave a 16 hour shift some times I swear I'm not coming back. But I do.
  2. 1
    I agree with the first post!! Your job will never care about you or your mental state!! You have to care for you. I have a great job in a nicu but unfortunately ALL our managers are new at managing and therefore suck at it. I've been there a little over a year and although the job is good I'm leaving and can't wait. My reasons are different, it's not a good fit for me and my personality. I've come to terms with the fact that I really don't enjoy hospital based nursing. I've never had anxiety or problems managing stress but I do now. I don't think I'm cut out for the fast pace and stress of a lot of hospital jobs. Floor nursing in any department is hard and stressful and I'm the kind of person that would rather have a better quality of life then that. I'm seeking work at the public health dept. I still love nursing but I think we all have to find where we would best fit to do an awesome job. Running meds down the hall isn't for me. I wish it was because I dreamed of being a floor nurse but I have to be realistic about who I am and it's just not me. I love nursing for that fact. We can use our degree to work in so many different ways there is a place for everyone. I've even thought about school nursing. There's so many choices we don't have to be stuck at a crazy job where the stress will take us from nurse to patient, it's not worth it. I'm going on maternity leave in April and I'm not coming back! I'm so excited its the best decision I've made this new year!
    anotherone likes this.
  3. 1
    Good for you, Blue Roses! As nurses, we advocate for our patients, but we often seem to forget to advocate for ourselves (and each other, as some of the responses indicate). If more of us had the guts that you do, maybe some of this abuse by facilities, management, other nurses and even support staff would stop.

    I am in a similar situation to what you were in. Toxic environment, heavy loads, highly acute patients, and in my case, few resources because I work in a stand-alone facility with no resources. A code usually means a call to 911.

    I'm constantly stressed and find myself taking it out on my family. I would quit today if I had another job lined up, but I haven't been at this facility too long and I have to stay for at least a year. Long story, but I have to "clean up" my resume... nothing bad, just a few moves from one part of the country to another, so it looks bad on my resume.

    Not only that, but I am my family's main breadwinner, so the pressure of that keeps me in one place. There are days that I am sure I won't be able to make it through the shift, but luckily, most of my co-workers are great (there are some REALLY bad ones that I wish would just quit) and that makes it a little easier some days. By no means does having good co-workers erase the anxiety and stress, but at least having someone there who has my back helps a little.

    Good for you for going after what you want. Leaving without notice may come back to you later, but you can overcome it by being honest and explain why you left without throwing the facility under the bus (as much as they might deserve it)... leaving with no notice once isn't going to completely derail you, especially since you already have another job lined up. Just stay at that one for a while and you'll be in the clear.
    Barley likes this.
  4. 0
    I hope you don't find yourself blackballed in the future,nursing is a surprisingly small pond and your manager is a bigger fish then you. We should all remember that FMLA is available and it is for our protection,use it.
  5. 0
    I am glad that you are taking care of yourself; I hope your new job works out better for you. I would sit on those letters for a while. Writing our thoughts down can be extremely cathartic and healing; however, don't underestimate the damage the hospital and your manager can do to your career. Leaving with no notice was probably not the best move, but it is understandable that you had to do what was best for your health, but sending out those letters could be flushing yourself down the proverbial toilet and could ruin not only your new job, but also your reputation and future employment.

    Good luck!
  6. 1
    If you must leave a job, then you must, and, you did just that. I'd not even give a moment's worry about that place - it was so bad. If circumstances were different, then you'd do the 2 weeks. I'd never give a month notice as some request, how ridiculous.

    Really, always remember this: Nursing is just a job, no more special than anyone else's job in the scheme of the world turning. Own your life and think, who the crap outside of nursing would put up with that kind of garbage you had to deal with???? Nobody I know. Screw them. After all, they can get as threatening as they please, but most of us have enough evidence about some of our employers, that would cause quite a stir. I know I do about a few.
    hecallsmeDuchess likes this.
  7. 6
    Excuse me, but this is not necessarily all about a "toxic" work environment (gawd, I hate trendy terms like that). The OP said that she has a previous (undiagnosed) psych history and knows that she's losing it. Staying up all night to make sure her fiance is still breathing? Really? For all anyone, including she, knows, the "toxicity" she was feeling might have been a result, not a cause, of her breakdown.

    Congratulations on leaving with the undertone of "now it'll all be fine" are premature. And for the record, two weeks' notice is standard. Just don't show up someday and you leave the people behind you to indulge in rumor and innuendo, and some of it may not redound to your credit.

    For all the people who post here about how LTC is no damn picnic, I am dubious about this change of venue being a cure-all for her problems. I wish you the best, dear, I really do...but don't stop the counseling even if you feel better in the short term, because it looks like you'll need a much more solid foundation than you have now. You can have a couple of deaths in two weeks in LTC, too. The hospice nurses will tell you that every death brings memories and feelings of all the previous ones; beware. Be A-ware. Make sure your therapy specifically addresses this issue.

    And as for the wedding: I've been to many, many weddings. The ones that are the most happily memorable were NOT the most expensive, complicated, fancy, huge, or gilded. No wedding is worth starting a marriage in debt or financial strain, especially when there's a little fragility going on anyway. Dial it back there, too; you will be really glad you did.
  8. 1
    Well, regardless of whether or not people like the use of the cliche, "toxic environment," unfortunately, the term is often enough most accurate. I don't have the time to relate the number of toxic environments I have seen in healthcare over the years--not even if I were getting paid for listing them!!!

    Holy cow. It's like these mid-managers read from the same script. "Life isn't always fair." They show they have their favorites-- usually those that help move them along their career trajectory in some way. There's little to no integrity in their economy of nurses as resources.

    They are the "leaders" that want to make me puke my organs into my boots. They are the problem, and they will continue to be so, so long as their superiors embrace this approach to "leadership." Yea, yea, yea. They will give the right PC political-speak, but as another cliche goes, "actions speak louder than words."

    I have seen some hospital, nurse-"leadership"-manipulated environments as well as staff-nurse-manipulated environments that are so toxic, the most psychologically healthy of people can be pushed to no longer think and act straight after being there for a while.

    Unless there is a true move to legitimately cleaning up and healing the toxic place, the only sane solution is to get out. Sometimes the situation is so compelling that worrying about doing the PC thing in terms of references and burning bridges no longer matters. If it gets to that point, it may well be about immediate sanity and survival.

    The key to the not-burning-bridges approach is to make an intelligent decision about the health of the environment sooner rather than latter. If, however, you stay too long without assessing this, you may end up putting yourself into survival mode, and then you just have to take your chances.

    So, the adage of not burning bridges makes sense, but only when you make an intelligent, informed decision about the environment before you get too fried or burnt to a crisp. Sometimes that's easier said than done.

    Good luck OP in your new role. Fly free and be well!
    Genista likes this.
  9. 3
    I really don't want to thread jack here - but I know of 5 nurses who have been granted worker's compensation for stress-induced disability in the last 3 years. Naturally, I don't have all the inside information about their individual health issues, but the outcome was the same. I can guarantee you that this will get the attention of the higher-ups. Has to be reported on OSHA/workers comp and will have an effect on their organizational ratings for a number of things, including amount paid for liability coverage.

    I really applaud organizations that are 'getting it' - by recognizing the need for emotional support for clinical staff. Critical incident debriefing and related resources (after patient deaths)for affected staff should be the standard, not the exception.

    I hope everything works out well for the OP. But, like many of us crusty old bats -- a long time ago I realized that the grass is only greener where it is watered and cared for.
  10. 0
    Quote from HouTx
    I really don't want to thread jack here - but I know of 5 nurses who have been granted worker's compensation for stress-induced disability in the last 3 years. Naturally, I don't have all the inside information about their individual health issues, but the outcome was the same. I can guarantee you that this will get the attention of the higher-ups. Has to be reported on OSHA/workers comp and will have an effect on their organizational ratings for a number of things, including amount paid for liability coverage.

    I really applaud organizations that are 'getting it' - by recognizing the need for emotional support for clinical staff. Critical incident debriefing and related resources (after patient deaths)for affected staff should be the standard, not the exception.

    I hope everything works out well for the OP. But, like many of us crusty old bats -- a long time ago I realized that the grass is only greener where it is watered and cared for.
    Great reply. . .and so very true.


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