Staff nurse with MSN - page 2

Hi all, I have been an RN for less than a year, and I have been thinking about going back to school for my MSN since I graduated. I want to choose a program option that is not for people who want... Read More

  1. by   Lovely_RN
    Go for it because might change your mind in the future. Why wait until you actually need the advance degree to get it? If you have the time and resources to do it now then go for it. Who knows what may happen 10 or 15 years down the road? Maybe by then you will be tired of the bedside and one of those positions that you are not interested in now will look good to you. You will be a nurse with many years of experience under your belt and a MSN. You will be a great candidate for advancement in the future and you can always go for a post masters specialty later on if need be.
  2. by   traumaRUs
    I did an MSN in management and leadership not necessarily because I wanted to go into management, just that the MSN fit the bill so that later I had more choices. I worked for 14 months as a staff nurse with an MSN and I did every task, menial or otherwise. I went back to school for a post-MSN clinical nurse specialist and guess what? I still domenial tasks: I answer the phone, I answer call lights, I help people. Its part of the job for all of us.

    I do encourage you to go for the MSN though because it will give you options down the road.
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from NextSummer
    Yeah, that's why I was wondering if I could get into a master's program with my purpose statement that is not really related to these things... Actually I am considering a program that is more heavily focused on nursing theory/ philosophy than other nursing programs in my area. But still, without a clear career goal in those three areas, I have to doubt it's worth even applying for the master's program that I am considering.
    You are still very new right now and your age is posted as 26...so young too. Give it a little time. Master's Program's are very expensive and take a lot of dedication. Perhaps, if you wait a year or two or even more your desire to advance your practice or comfort with managerial positions will change. Most experienced nurses tell you to never limit yourself which is great advice, but remember too, do not push yourself into a specialized/advanced area before you are ready because you feel as if you should be doing something. Sometimes, just enjoying being a staff nurse for a period of time without being in school is a good thing. You have plenty of time and plenty of options.

    To satisfy your interest in nursing philosophy and theory, there are tons of books and literature that you can get your hands on to read in your spare time. One does not have to be sitting in a classroom or enrolled at a university under the direction of an instructor to further one's education and knowledge base.
  4. by   Pompom
    I work with a few nurses who have their MSN and are still bedside nurses. I think if you want your MSN then go for it. Perhaps 20 yrs. down the line you will want to change your career and at least you will have the degree to do it.
  5. by   kate1114
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I did an MSN in management and leadership not necessarily because I wanted to go into management, just that the MSN fit the bill so that later I had more choices. I worked for 14 months as a staff nurse with an MSN and I did every task, menial or otherwise. I went back to school for a post-MSN clinical nurse specialist and guess what? I still domenial tasks: I answer the phone, I answer call lights, I help people. Its part of the job for all of us.

    I do encourage you to go for the MSN though because it will give you options down the road.

    It's good to see other people out there who have done bedside with a management MSN! I am currently a bedside nurse in a MICU, and I love taking care of patients. The MSN has helped me to see a whole other side of nursing, even though I don't really see myself working as a unit manager. During my MSN, I took some education electives and discovered that I absolutely love teaching. It made sense, since I did a lot of education and precepting on my unit at the time.

    An MSN will broaden your experiences and open you up for all sorts of advancement opportunities. The flip side is that there are a lot of people out there who are unsupportive of furthering education, particularly if you don't have a specific plan for how you wish to use the degree. I had a boss with an ADN who started to feel threatened by me taking the program, and many coworkers thought I was somewhat crazy for continuing in school since I already had my BSN. They didn't get it, that it was something that I was doing for myself and it had nothing to do with them. And I got tired of reassuring my boss that I wasn't out to take her job

    I would encourage you to look into MSN programs. Some people start with one goal and end with another. I started with an interest in informatics, found that to be a bit unreasonable considering my geographic area, and graduated with an interest in education and research. Many of the first few courses (theory, research) are core courses for everyone. I would look for a program that offers a wide range of programs so you could change easily. Also, look into tuition reimbursement and scholarships. I wound up getting my master's for practically free. Also, many schools have information nights set up. If not, they should be happy to meet with you and share some options.

    Good luck and I hope you find the answers you're looking for!
  6. by   adria37
    As a staff nurse with a MSN I would say make sure where you work and your supervisor is not easily threatened. I have decided if I ever work as a staff nurse anywhere else I will not mention my advanced degree. I don't know how many times I have heard "Well you have the master's degree........."
  7. by   NurseCard
    You know, I wouldn't mind doing this myself... going back to school to get my MSN just to have that experience and knowledge. Gonna be a while before I have the necessary resources though... namely extra money and somewhat grown children.
  8. by   SharonH, RN
    You might considering pursuing a master's degree for a clinical nurse leader if that is available in your area. As I understand it, this is supposed to be a master's degree for the bedside nurse. I do think you will be expected to assume something of a leadership role on the unit as opposed to a management role but after your education and preparation you may be very ready to do just that.

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