Snow & calling out of work - page 12

So I've been a nurse for 4 years now. I live in the south where snow is not common. As of today every school system in the area is closed due to the snow. I have no kids, but this tells you how bad... Read More

  1. by   Farawyn
    Quote from kidzcare
    So, how in depth does my emergency weather plan need to be? 2-3 hours on each side of a shift?

    There is no reason a parent should use an excuse of "It's because of my kids!" for everything, but it is SOMETIMES a valid reason.

    It seems some are calling back to "the olden days" when nurses should only have been abstinent spinsters with no interests/obligations outside of their occupation.

    I am many, many things. Mother, sister, daughter, runner, friend, confidant, nurse, crocheter, chef, maid, cat owner, smokin' hot date, comic relief, sarcastic side kick, wingman, beer snob, wine drinker, reformed smoker, tutor, pianist, silent grammar nazi, ashamed grammer misuser, Facebook addict, perpetually punctual, hairdresser, waitress, thespian, singer ect.

    This list goes on and on and each one of those help define who I am as a person. Nurse is only one of the things on the list.
    *adds message board buddy to list*
  2. by   Farawyn
    Quote from canigraduate
    A lot of these posters make it sound like Armageddon will happen if they don't get to work in a disaster. I'm sorry, no one person is that important.
    1 person plus 1 person plus 1 person plus 1 person...
  3. by   Jules A
    Quote from canigraduate
    I am pointing out dangers that others may have not considered so they can temper their judgmental and holier than thou attitudes.

    A lot of these posters make it sound like Armageddon will happen if they don't get to work in a disaster. I'm sorry, no one person is that important.
    So as someone who drove their tired butt to work yesterday in 6+ inches of totally snow covered roads, 2 hours each way, I resent the implication that some of us feel holier than thou and are being martyrs by feeling it is important to make it to work if at all possible.

    Although the children I was scheduled to see would have survived without me I felt it was my duty to not only care for my patients but show support for the rest of my staff who made arrangements to come to work. All of us would have preferred to stay home rather than take chances in nasty driving conditions but we didn't. If that makes me holier than thou so be it. Personally I think it shows my sense of obligation and responsibility to my patients and my team.

    Bottom line is everyone needs to do what they feel is appropriate for any given situation and live with the consequences. My facility does make note of those who call out for weather.
  4. by   kidzcare
    Quote from Farawyn
    *adds message board buddy to list*
    Thanks!!
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Ah, the annual "it's snowing, do I really have to go to work?" thread. Wouldn't be winter if we didn't have at least one Next year's thread should be ready to post in about eight months

    I've worked acute-care floor nursing, and now work clinic hours. I've always worked in a snow belt.

    I don't consider myself a martyr, and wouldn't throw myself on a grenade for anyone I work with (or have ever worked with) but I believe that a solid work ethic has kept me making the right choice when presented with bad-weather situations. What do I mean by that? I mean that if I am scheduled to work, I get there. Sometimes I've gone in early, before the storm hits; I've stayed at the hospital the night before my shift if it was going to be a blizzard overnight. No martyr, but it's my JOB to be there, so....I get there.

    I've stayed at work for two-three days (NOT happy, but....it was the safest choice). I did this because I knew if I went home I wouldn't be able to get back in the morning (if an overnight storm), or because the storm was bad enough right then that it would be safer to stay put. I've never had a problem finding a bit of real estate in the hospital; whenever a nursing supervisor hears me say "I don't want to miss my shift" or "I want to be sure I can work tomorrow, and if I go home now I don't think I can make it back in"....guess what? I have a bed. When they know I'm doing my best to be there, they help me do that, as well as any other nurse who is in the same situation.

    I have been surprised by an early storm, realized I couldn't go in before it hit, and just had to leave very early so I'd have plenty of time to drive slowly, carefully, no rushing. I hate driving in those kinds of conditions, but I am EXPECTED to go to work when I'm scheduled to be there!

    If I don't show up, I am not leaving someone else to work in my place, as it's not shift work, BUT if I am not there, people will go without the services I would provide them, my co-workers would be overburdened because of my unexpected absence, and that's completely unfair IMHO.

    I go in early. I stay late. I sleep over PRN. I drive SLOWLY and CAREFULLY and while I will always hate driving in bad winter weather (who the heck likes it?!) it's what I have to do as long as I am employed as a nurse, and would like to STAY employed. FWIW, my facility's policy has the same rules for anyone, NOT just nursing; they don't want to see administration calling out for bad weather as it sets a bad example for the rest. Bravo to them for that!
  6. by   Bezoars
    Quote from newboy
    I know I'm in the minority here, but I will call out depending on how bad the snowfall is. Of course a few flakes is not going to keep me home, but I don't travel in snow storms or blizzards.
    Unfortunately, if you are a nurse and work in a hospital you are usually considered essential personnel. I don't know a hospital that would accept the excuse "I don't travel in snow storms". Everyone knows nurses go to work in heat and snow and power outages and holidays. We go. If not for your patients, for your co-workers who also braved weather to get there and would like to get home. I'm in the Mid-East and we have had lots of bad weather here. If you call and say you can't get here.... we will send a four-wheel drive to come get you, so get those scrubs on!
  7. by   Angeljho
    Well, I live in a city where travel bans are initiated when the weather is too dangerous to... well... travel. So yep, I don't travel when it's unsafe to travel. But I will be so glad to take lessons on how to drive through black ice, scuba dive to work through floods, or hang glide over piles of snow if anyone is willing to teach?
  8. by   kidzcare
    Quote from newboy
    Well, I live in a city where travel bans are initiated when the weather is too dangerous to... well... travel. So yep, I don't travel when it's unsafe to travel. But I will be so glad to take lessons on how to drive through black ice, scuba dive to work through floods, or hang glide over piles of snow if anyone is willing to teach?
    Was this not covered in your nursing curriculum? If you were a better person/nurse you would have taken these classes at your own expense in order to perform your duties. For shame.**


    **this is sarcasm
  9. by   kidzcare
    So what is the feeling on the nurses in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina? Surely dozens of patients were left behind as hospital personnel fled for their lives. It's a horrifying reality.

    Should they have planned ahead for this inevitable situation? How accountable should they be held? Abandonment? Manslaughter? Premeditated murder? After all, they had chosen to live and work in a city built below sea level.
    Last edit by kidzcare on Mar 6, '15
  10. by   FlyingScot
    Quote from newboy
    Well, I live in a city where travel bans are initiated when the weather is too dangerous to... well... travel. So yep, I don't travel when it's unsafe to travel.
    Nurses are considered essential personnel. Travel bans don't apply.
  11. by   VANurse2010
    Quote from newboy
    Well, I live in a city where travel bans are initiated when the weather is too dangerous to... well... travel. So yep, I don't travel when it's unsafe to travel. But I will be so glad to take lessons on how to drive through black ice, scuba dive to work through floods, or hang glide over piles of snow if anyone is willing to teach?
    I enjoy your posts, so don't take this the wrong way but.... You would be fired if you did this where I work.
  12. by   Bezoars
    Quote from newboy
    Well, I live in a city where travel bans are initiated when the weather is too dangerous to... well... travel. So yep, I don't travel when it's unsafe to travel. But I will be so glad to take lessons on how to drive through black ice, scuba dive to work through floods, or hang glide over piles of snow if anyone is willing to teach?
    Nurses are essential personnel. I've never witnessed a travel ban that included firefighters, police officers, paramedics.... people with critical jobs. Glad they all go to work when it snows. The point of this whole thread is not who you will give up your life for, who you have at home who depends on you or needs you, how important your co-workers or family are, whether you don't care if you lose your job, or any of that non-sense. The real issue here is about doing the right thing. It's a matter of character. You were hired to do a job. You are essential. When you took the job, you were entrusted with the position because you knew the requirements. You signed a contract and made a promise that when you are scheduled to work, you will be there. You will be there because other people are important too (like patients who need you and co-workers who also have people they love and lives to lead). You were hired on that premise, and it's your responsibility to keep your contract. Whether you're a new nurse, an old nurse, a cynical nurse, or an optimistic fresh-faced nurse. You gotta get there. It's the right thing to do and we have enough self-centered, all-out-for-myself people in this world. Just do your job... that's all we ask of you. If you couldn't hack it, you should have been a librarian or something. Why are even debating this????
  13. by   MatrixRn
    I think the bottom line is if someone is scheduled to work they should go unless they are unable. Let me be frank, management knows if you are pulling their chain. If someone lives a mile from the hospital on Main St and says they can't make it, yet someone else is further away and lives on back roads, but can.....guess who is in trouble.

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