Should BSNs be paid more?

  1. 0
    I know ADNs and BSNs both sit for the same NCLEX exam, both have approximately four years of education, and at best have negligible differences (over time) in their nursing skills. BSNs take courses than broaden their overall knowledge; however, ADNs have more clinical experience prior to entering the workforce. Should there be a differential for BSNs, or should the reward for obtaining a BSN lie in the ability to advance one's career?

    I'm not trying to start an ADN vs BSN bashing, I'm just curious to see what you all think.
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  4. 0
    No. (that's all i'll answer here)
  5. 0
    in my opinion, only if the nurse will be using the additional skills/knowledge they gained in getting that bsn. so for things like management, case management, qi, education, then yes, they probably should be getting more money. but not for bedside nurses.

    i've had a few hospitals that i worked at gave those of us with a bsn a higher rate: 10 cents an hour. wow.

    ok, maybe its easy for me to say because i was one who was getting the extra pay. but it seems like they did it so they could say "we reward our nurses who further their education," without really doing something meaningful.
  6. 0
    Oh my goodness!

    No (same as Marie)
  7. 0
    (Please G-d stop the insanity....I'M BEGGING YOU!!!!)
  8. 0
    Keep in mind that pay is not determined by who "deserves" more, but rather is guided by market forces. Thus, it is possible that someone with a two year degree (or no degree at all) will earn more than someone who has gone to school and obtained a PhD. One example that comes to mind is social work where a masters degree is almost considered the minimum for entry level into practice (psychology is much the same). My brother in law is a car salesman (both used and new) seldom earning under 150K per year and he didn't even finish his first year in college. I would imagine that many RN's (whether ASN/ADN or BSN) earn more than many social workers with masters degrees. I remember a history class where the teacher discussed the situation in Europe after the Black Plague of the Middle Ages. One thing that stuck in my head was the instructor saying that in the ten year period following the Plague that farm laborers made more than merchants, and wealthy master craftsmen. That was because the population had been reduced so much by the Plague that the demand for simple labor was at an all time high.

    In addition, there is a tendency within professions, and among industries in general to lobby for legislation (and for legislation to be enacted via other means) at both the federal and state level which reduces competition (and thereby increases pay or profit for those who remain or enter the field). One example (and there are hundreds) is pharmacy where the requirements have been raised over the last century from OJT, to a two year degree, then a four, and now a six year "Pharm D" degree. A similiar situation has occured among doctors, CPA's, and even electricians and other "trades". My point is that if current trends in this area are maintained it would not surprise me to come back to a world in a hundred years (were it possible) where to become an RN required eight years of schooling, while M.D's spent decades in medical training just for entry level credentials.



    Quote from edcampbe
    I know ADNs and BSNs both sit for the same NCLEX exam, both have approximately four years of education, and at best have negligible differences (over time) in their nursing skills. BSNs take courses than broaden their overall knowledge; however, ADNs have more clinical experience prior to entering the workforce. Should there be a differential for BSNs, or should the reward for obtaining a BSN lie in the ability to advance one's career?

    I'm not trying to start an ADN vs BSN bashing, I'm just curious to see what you all think.
    Last edit by Roland on Jul 29, '05
  9. 0
    :smackingf
  10. 0
    I think a BSN differential IS in order.

    (and I am an AD nurse)
  11. 0
    I don't care either way. The most I have ever been rewarded for my BSN was 50cents an hour. I feel it should be treated the same way as certifications as far as pay is concerned.
  12. 0
    Quote from fergus51
    I don't care either way. The most I have ever been rewarded for my BSN was 50cents an hour. I feel it should be treated the same way as certifications as far as pay is concerned.
    I do agree!


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