Shift/Full Time Questions

  1. Hey everyone. I have some silly questions, but I would rather ask ya'll than my teachers (not going there). Im a little confused about what is considered "full time" as a nurse. Is it 36 hrs?

    Also, can someone tell me about the "Weekend Special" shift? What is that like? Do you work 2 days and get paid for 3? Im so confused!

    Thanks so much for any replies.
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    "full time" depends on shifts.

    Generally with 8 hour shifts "full time" means you will work 40 hours a week.

    With 12 hour shifts, "full time" means 3 12 hour shifts a week, or 36 hours.

    Then, there are special agreements, like Weekend only shifts which are also "fulltime"

    Often you will see in the ad for a job "0.6 or 0.9 FTE". This means you will work 2-12 hour shifts as a 0.6, and 3-12 hour shifts as a 0.9 FTE.

    hope this helps.
  4. by   elkpark
    "full time" depends on shifts.

    Generally with 8 hour shifts "full time" means you will work 40 hours a week.

    With 12 hour shifts, "full time" means 3 12 hour shifts a week, or 36 hours.

    Then, there are special agreements, like Weekend only shifts which are also "fulltime"

    Often you will see in the ad for a job "0.6 or 0.9 FTE". This means you will work 2-12 hour shifts as a 0.6, and 3-12 hour shifts as a 0.9 FTE.

    hope this helps.
    To expand a little on what SmilingBluEyes says; basically, each hospital/facility/organization gets to define what "full-time" and "part-time' are for their operation. There are also several different possibilities for "weekend only" options, also defined by each individual hospital/organization. With some you get a bonus for working the weekends, with some you don't.

    I have worked places (not recently, granted) where nurses worked 12 hour shifts, but "full-time" still meant 40 hrs/week, so you had to put in that extra four hours somehow each week ... Many hospitals also use their definitions of "full-time" and "part-time" to designate who is eligible for benefits (inc. insurance).

    When you start looking for nursing jobs, it is important to make sure that you understand exactly what the hospital/organization is offering you and what you are agreeing to, in terms of hours, wages, and benefits, before you commit to anything. Best wishes!
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    elkpark is so right; make sure you know how the facility defines "full time".

    Check with the HR dept (human resources) of any facility to know specifics of the positions in which you are interested, to make sure you are clear on what is expected of you. Good luck!
  6. by   Nurse Alissa
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    "full time" depends on shifts.

    Generally with 8 hour shifts "full time" means you will work 40 hours a week.

    With 12 hour shifts, "full time" means 3 12 hour shifts a week, or 36 hours.

    Then, there are special agreements, like Weekend only shifts which are also "fulltime"

    Often you will see in the ad for a job "0.6 or 0.9 FTE". This means you will work 2-12 hour shifts as a 0.6, and 3-12 hour shifts as a 0.9 FTE.

    hope this helps.
    Thank you guys so much for your responces. I just have 1 more question: I get that 2-12s =.6 and 3-12s=.9, but what exactly are .6 and .9 refering to?

    Thanks!!
  7. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Nurse Alissa
    Thank you guys so much for your responces. I just have 1 more question: I get that 2-12s =.6 and 3-12s=.9, but what exactly are .6 and .9 refering to?

    Thanks!!
    0.6 and 0.9 are based on the "standard" 40-hour work week (or 80 hour biweekly period)

    2 12's = 24 hours = 60% (0.6 FTE) of 40 hours
    3 12's = 36 hours = 90% (0.9 FTE) of 40 hours

    FTE = full-time equivalents
  8. by   Nurse Alissa
    Quote from RN4NICU
    0.6 and 0.9 are based on the "standard" 40-hour work week (or 80 hour biweekly period)

    2 12's = 24 hours = 60% (0.6 FTE) of 40 hours
    3 12's = 36 hours = 90% (0.9 FTE) of 40 hours

    FTE = full-time equivalents
    I get it now, thanks!!
  9. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from Nurse Alissa
    Thank you guys so much for your responces. I just have 1 more question: I get that 2-12s =.6 and 3-12s=.9, but what exactly are .6 and .9 refering to?

    Thanks!!
    FTE stands for Full Time Equivelant, as NICU said. A percentage of full time. My institution FT is 3 11.5 hr shifts (we actually get paid for leaving a half hour late to finish report, minus a break), plus an extra shift a month. So you have a 4 day week (which is torture). I've seen almost every # of FTE's from 0.2 to 1.0. The question is, will they give you the position you need??
  10. by   Nurse Alissa
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    FTE stands for Full Time Equivelant, as NICU said. A percentage of full time. My institution FT is 3 11.5 hr shifts (we actually get paid for leaving a half hour late to finish report, minus a break), plus an extra shift a month. So you have a 4 day week (which is torture). I've seen almost every # of FTE's from 0.2 to 1.0. The question is, will they give you the position you need??
    Im really interested in a weekend night shift, 12 hrs. What is the most common special they offer for this type of hours?
  11. by   stidget99
    Quote from Nurse Alissa
    Im really interested in a weekend night shift, 12 hrs. What is the most common special they offer for this type of hours?
    I currently work that special weekend program. I work 3 days/week......Sat, Sun, and Wed. At my hospital, this is considered to be full time. As far as the bonus goes....I get paid an extra $5/hour over and above base pay for actual weekend hours worked. So, weekend hours include from 11pm Friday night to 7am Monday morning. Now, I wouldn't get paid the extra $5/hour for the hours worked between 7pm and 11pm on Friday nite (not an issue for me because I don't work Friday nites).

    At the last hospital I worked the benefits of the "weekend option" were much better. We got paid an extra $13/hour over and above the base wage when everything was said and done (i.e. an extra $6/hour for weekend option, plus an extra $3/hour for weekend diff and another $3/hour for the noc diff).

    Now, I believe that w/ any weekender program.....there are provisions made to have one weekend off every so many weekends...my experience is having every 8th or 9th weekend off.

    As the others have said.....make sure you know just exactly what kind of agreement you are signing on for. Hope that helps
  12. by   mariedoreen
    Quote from stidget99
    At the last hospital I worked the benefits of the "weekend option" were much better. We got paid an extra $13/hour over and above the base wage when everything was said and done
    I can't wait to sign up for that kind of deal when I graduate... Here's to Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday... My kind of weekend! :chuckle
  13. by   Nurse Alissa
    Thanks so much, everyone! I understand it all now, and Im looking foward to begining my nursing career!

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