Scariest things you've seen - page 9

What is the scariest thing you have seen other nurses do? We have all seen some pretty ignorant, or uncaring things. Just curious. Someone should probably write a book.... Read More

  1. by   KarafromPhilly
    New doc wanted to order 60mEq of KCl IV PUSH, so I gently explained to him that we can't do that. Odd thing was that this was the same guy who ordered a STAT EKG on a 19 year old sickle cell patient. She was septic and getting tachy. I asked him, uh, why did he want an EKG on this patient? He answered, "To see whether it's cardiogenic in origin." I guess he just really wanted to see SOMEthing cardiac, even if he had to cause it himself?
  2. by   redheadRN
    Saw a new LPN pour liquid morphine into a med cup and then go to bring it to the patient. When I stopped her, she stated thats how she's always done it! She had been working on the unit for almost a month. When I showed her how to use a fitted top for the bottle and a syringe, she said"That seems like a big hassle." The patient was ok, and Wonder how accurate that count was?
  3. by   LydiaGreen
    Quote from kcrnsue
    I gave report the the oncoming day shift that unit #2 of blood had just been hung on mr. x. After 12 hr shift- report was given that the blood (unit #2) was almost done infusing.
    That's terrible! Was it just a slip in details during the report (meaning did they actually mean that the patient received an additional two units of blood seperate from what you had reported on on the earlier shift) or was that blood really hanging for 12 hours!?!
  4. by   kcrnsue
    That's terrible! Was it just a slip in details during the report (meaning did they actually mean that the patient received an additional two units of blood seperate from what you had reported on on the earlier shift) or was that blood really hanging for 12 hours!?!
    It really was the same unit of blood.
  5. by   LydiaGreen
    Quote from kcrnsue
    It really was the same unit of blood.
    Was the patient okay?
  6. by   kcrnsue
    Quote from LydiaGreen
    Was the patient okay?
    yes, fortunately.
  7. by   emsboss
    Walked into our E.R. to see how things were going (small hospital...3-bed E.R., 12 bed acute care.) There was an older guy whom I had transported several times, extensive cardiac/CVA Hx. He was in a bed, rubbing his chest so I asked him (no nurse/doc in sight) if he was having chest pain and he nodded yes, as he is unable to talk. Hooked him to a monitor and saw 2nd degree AVB type 2 in 2:1. Called for the doc who asked "WTF are you doing practicing medicine without a license." I showed him the strip and he laughed and said it was "just sinus rhythm with bigemeny of blocked PAC's . HMMM...Everything marched out...Long story short...We took the pt. to a tertiary facility, cathed and CABG'd. Doc no longer employed at facility.
  8. by   wam79
    Seen to many over the years

    One I will never forget. Resident pushed narcan into a terminal Pancreatic Ca pt who was on Dilaudid IV drip at 12mg/hr. The resident wanted to " assess the pain level". The woman imediatly began to screaming in agony. It took hours to get her comfortable again & her family was afraid to leave her side. Don't know what happened to the resident,but he never came to the Med/Onc ward again.
  9. by   mattsmom81
    Scary nurses, in my experience, are usually the result of an overly egotistical new nurse, in over their head, who disregards instructions.

    I have shared this before but I will never forget this. I was 'ordered' to precept a new nurse (less than a year medsurg experience) to hearts and allow him to assist with care/tx. (gotta love management's warm body solutions...not) He insisted he should help with care and announced he would administer the next Krider, after watching me use the buretrol twice and hearing my lecture on cautious K replacement to the shock heart following surgery.

    I saw VTach on my monitor to find him giving the KRider wide open in the Swan sideport, totally disregarding my instructions. Patient converted, thankfully, and I felt compelled to refuse to precept this nurse one second further. He was reassigned to telemetry after this.

    The scariest people are those who think they know it all. This is why new grads IMO do not belong in most ICU settings, particularly without a dedicated internship program...they tend as a group to lack the common sense experience and the understanding that comes with a few years of medsurg experience under their belts. They simply do not know what they don't know. Give me a savvy, sharp medsurg nurse who is motivated, asks questions and knows their limits and I'll precept them anytime in my ICU if I'm staffed to do so.

    I could write a book on similar experiences to the above, and its why I feel so strongly about appropriate education systems in today's busy, understaffed units.

    Another overzealous new nurse in ICU repeatedly shocked a paced rhythm. She failed to note her patient had a pulse and BP and claimed she was treating 'vtach' ...with pacer spikes and subcutaneous pacer obvious to the observant eye. She lost her patient and (appropriately) her job.

    I'm sure these examples will spur accusations of 'young eating' here by some, but I simply cannot say it enough: we MUST be aware of our limitations in this profession.
  10. by   txspadequeenRN
    I was a nursing student assigned to train in tele one day,and my instructer was on the floor with me. Mrs Mac was one of the head nurses in the ICU ,very well respected and students from all schools came to her with questions . A student from a well known University in Texas came up to my teacher and ask " I have got to give a patient this medication,but after I break the top off the ampule how do I keep from cutting his lip when I pour it in his mouth"!!!! I kid you not.
  11. by   nursechick182
    I didn't actually see this, but a doctor I work with in the NICU said a nurse once gave sodium bicarb through an arterial line instead of a PIV.
  12. by   LydiaGreen
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Scary nurses, in my experience, are usually the result of an overly egotistical new nurse, in over their head, who disregards instructions.

    I have shared this before but I will never forget this. I was 'ordered' to precept a new nurse (less than a year medsurg experience) to hearts and allow him to assist with care/tx. (gotta love management's warm body solutions...not) He insisted he should help with care and announced he would administer the next Krider, after watching me use the buretrol twice and hearing my lecture on cautious K replacement to the shock heart following surgery.

    I saw VTach on my monitor to find him giving the KRider wide open in the Swan sideport, totally disregarding my instructions. Patient converted, thankfully, and I felt compelled to refuse to precept this nurse one second further. He was reassigned to telemetry after this.

    The scariest people are those who think they know it all. This is why new grads IMO do not belong in most ICU settings, particularly without a dedicated internship program...they tend as a group to lack the common sense experience and the understanding that comes with a few years of medsurg experience under their belts. They simply do not know what they don't know. Give me a savvy, sharp medsurg nurse who is motivated, asks questions and knows their limits and I'll precept them anytime in my ICU if I'm staffed to do so.

    I could write a book on similar experiences to the above, and its why I feel so strongly about appropriate education systems in today's busy, understaffed units.

    Another overzealous new nurse in ICU repeatedly shocked a paced rhythm. She failed to note her patient had a pulse and BP and claimed she was treating 'vtach' ...with pacer spikes and subcutaneous pacer obvious to the observant eye. She lost her patient and (appropriately) her job.

    I'm sure these examples will spur accusations of 'young eating' here by some, but I simply cannot say it enough: we MUST be aware of our limitations in this profession.
    Having just graduated this past spring, you might think my response would be to take offense to your post. On the contrary, I agree with you one hundred percent. I want nothing more than to work med/surg for the next 12 months mininum (but preferably 24 months) while taking a maternity course, completely ACLS, PALS, and NALS. My hospital expects all of their new nurses to work all areas - supposedly with back-up, but when we are short-staffed to begin with and things get busy, back-up isn't always available. I disagree with this practice. With a large number of new nurses and a limited number of senior nurses, I can see management's difficulty in allowing us to strictly work med/surg but it is really difficult trying to learn two specialties at once when we are not even comfortable in med/surg nursing yet. My orientation was 10 shifts (2 L&D, 2 CCA, 6 med/surg, and 2 chronic). This is the norm here in Canada. One of my classmates was recruited to California where orientation for a peds unit was 6 MONTHS with 2 days a week in the classroom, and 3 days a week working with a preceptor! Now, THAT, would be a new nurse's dream!
  13. by   NurseRatchett
    Quote from psychrn03
    I work with a nurse in a prison who, when she is making rounds, redirects the pt if he starts asking too many questions by yelling out "Shut up and go to sleep! You're in prison!" It's one thing to be so abrasive, but when I read her charting, she often makes a note that she has reminded the inmate that he is in prison.
    OMG, this made me laugh out loud!!!!! :chuckle :chuckle I have got to make that my tag line, oh and reminding the patients that they are in prison............ :chuckle :chuckle :chuckle

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