Rude remarks by doc with his own kids - page 5

:uhoh21:last night when i got to work, i was pulled to another floor which did not bother me. as i went walking up the nurse's station, which sits right in front of the elevators, i seen one of our... Read More

  1. by   EmmaG
    I'm not sure how you can glean that from his post, but in any case...

    I object to this for the same reason I object to anyone bringing in small children to visit. Hospitals are nasty. So are small children for that matter. Many of *our* patients are either already infected or at high risk for infection. Either way, it's not a good environment in which to bring a little kid.

    The other reason I question this practice is that many patients (especially the older ones) are in the best of circumstances reluctant to talk to their docs, ask questions or express concerns. Throw some toddlers into the mix, and I can pretty much guarantee that will further stifle any communication. The doc certainly isn't going to be focused on the patient. IF the doc is simply poking his head in to say "hi", that's one thing (aside from what I said above), but to actually make rounds with the little ones in tow? Nah. Not a good idea, IMO.
  2. by   elthia
    My only experience with this is a somewhat different take.

    A surgery resident was doing late rounds and brought his VERY pregnant wife to the nurses station with him. Pulled up a chair, sat her in it, and said he'd be right back.

    Went and rounded on a few patients, but kept coming out and checking on her very nervously between each pt.

    Turns out, his wife was having contractions at 1-2 hours apart...and her water hadn't broken yet... She had driven herself to the hospital to meet him there.

    This was at a VA hospital....When I found out, she was in early stages, very early albeit...I got very green at the gills. NO nurse at this hospital had any experience with L&D.

    Found out later the baby was born 6 hours after they left the VA...L&D nurse feel free to laugh at me, just the thought of delivering a baby scares the crap out of me...give me someone having a good STEMI anyday.
  3. by   TiredMD
    Quote from delvenia
    wow, that really shows how much your patients have your attention, doesnt it.
    Seems like every time I disagree with a poster on this thread, someone like you always has to pop in with something like, "You must be a crappy doctor." Are you incapable of having a friendly disagreement?

    Regardless, here's my opinion on the infection risk of children:

    - MRSA and VRE are common both in and out of the hospital, though admittedly the resistance patterns in the hospital are a little nastier. Nonetheless, any immunocompetent individual has a relatively low risk of contracting a serious disease just from walking through a hospital or being in a hospital room. No, they probably shouldn't be in there if they are going to chew on the bed or lick the floor, but otherwise they should be fine. In the case of an infant being carried, if the child doesn't touch anything, the chances of contracting these infections is essentially nil, since they are not airborne.

    - A healthy child is no more likely to transmit an illness to a patient than a healthy person. Even if the child gave a patient a cold, this is not particular serious, and does not correlate with getting a serious bacterial illness. Health care workers are far more likely to transmit a serious bacteria to a patient than any random healthy child.
  4. by   del2009
    Quote from TiredMD
    Regardless, here's my opinion on the infection risk of children:

    - In the case of an infant being carried, if the child doesn't touch anything, the chances of contracting these infections is essentially nil, since they are not airborne.

    .
    what child have you ever seen that doesnt touch stuff or try to? in any case, you just proved my point. the doctor will have to focus his attention on the child to make sure that child doesnt. the fact still remains. no matter what your position is in a hospital it is still work and not a babysitter. kids should be at home with someone who has their full attention and patients have the right not to violated by someone bringing their family members into what should be a professional setting. it is unprofessional to bring children to work while you are working, regardless of the job you have.
  5. by   janettalinda
    If a doctor brot his child with him to visit me as a patient, I would refuse to pay for the visit. Even if only to poke thier head in door and say "how are you." Don't even answer this question! They charge for it as if it were an actual visit. I once had a patient who would throw a book at the doc if he did that because he always sent her a bill. lol. Nurses have to pay for child care, so should the doctors. Imagine choosing to save money by draging your kids around a hospital! Patients deserve their doctors undivided attention, esp considering how much we pay for 15 min of the doc's precious time.
  6. by   EmmaG
    Quote from TiredMD

    No, they probably shouldn't be in there if they are going to chew on the bed or lick the floor, but otherwise they should be fine.
    Haven't been around many two-year-olds, huh? Seems the only thing they don't want to put in their mouths is food...

    I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on this topic.
  7. by   november17
    Quote from TiredMD
    Seems like every time I disagree with a poster on this thread, someone like you always has to pop in with something like, "You must be a crappy doctor." Are you incapable of having a friendly disagreement?
    Hahaha...I get the same treatment sometimes (in other forums). Once people find out I'm a nurse, if I disagree with them, they're like, "I hope you never take care of my loved ones or me in the hospital!" And it will be over dumb stuff that is completely unrelated to my job.

    Me-"The oakland raiders suck."
    Them-"OMG How can you say that you're a terrible nurse!!"

    lol
  8. by   ktwlpn
    Quote from motorcycle mama
    He needs to be more concerned with the butt on his shoulders.
    right you are-I don't find his sense of humor very funny-but I like yours...

    Someone else said
    " The practice of rounding with children is not uncommon. Sometimes this is the only time they do get to see their kids and bond with them. " O PLEASE!---so take a *******' day OFF if you want to see your kids..Would ya drag them to work if you were a mechanic? A butcher?
  9. by   TiredMD
    Quote from ktwlpn
    " The practice of rounding with children is not uncommon. Sometimes this is the only time they do get to see their kids and bond with them. " O PLEASE!---so take a *******' day OFF if you want to see your kids..Would ya drag them to work if you were a mechanic? A butcher?
    Day off? Thanks for making me smile.

    <presently on day 7 of 14 in a row, with three overnight calls mixed in just for kicks>
  10. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from ktwlpn
    right you are-I don't find his sense of humor very funny-but I like yours...

    Someone else said
    " The practice of rounding with children is not uncommon. Sometimes this is the only time they do get to see their kids and bond with them. " O PLEASE!---so take a *******' day OFF if you want to see your kids..Would ya drag them to work if you were a mechanic? A butcher?

    I really feel like I must live in an alternate universe. Lots of people bring their kids to work - including butchers and mechanics and teachers and pilots and ranchers and hairdressers and librarians and computer geeks and .. .I could go on and on. What about "Take Your Kids To Work Day"?

    My husband has always taken our kids in the logging truck with him. Our youngest loves driving with Daddy. How else to bond with kids if you only limit yourself to seeing them at home? How else do your kids know what you do for a living?

    The original point was the doc's rudeness in front of his kids. That I think is appalling.

    But rounding with your kids? I think that is great!

    Our docs also make house calls and sometimes take their kids along.

    steph
  11. by   FireStarterRN
    Steph has a point. As long as the kids are well behaved, why not? They can wait in the family room, or even tag along as long as it's okay with the patient. Depends on the kid and the patients. But why shouldn't a child see what Daddy or Mommy do?
  12. by   elthia
    Quote from TiredMD
    Day off? Thanks for making me smile.

    <presently on day 7 of 14 in a row, with three overnight calls mixed in just for kicks>
    ktwlpn said
    O PLEASE!---so take a *******' day OFF if you want to see your kids..Would ya drag them to work if you were a mechanic? A butcher?
    I work in a teaching hospital...

    In residency sometimes there is no such thing as a day off. And the 80 hour work week rule gets bent more than it gets followed depending on the hospital.

    Residents sometimes get "locked in" due to their outrageous student loans and the way residency programs are run...until they are out of residency they work up to 80 or more hours a week for $45-60K a year. I can make that working part time as an RN. Residents can't just "quit" because they don't like the hours, or can't get a schedule they like.

    If a father brings his kids who are well behaved along to finish a quick round and write a few orders while on his way to the park more power to him, so long as he doesn't expect the nurses to watch the kids. It's not like he's having a slumber party in the oncall room. IMO this doesn't make him a bad parent...this makes him a father who is struggling to balance the roles of a doctor and parent. BUT at least he's trying to make time for his children.

    Also, admit it we all know the nurse who lied and called in sick because she didn't have child care...residents don't have that luxury.

    now second half
    My father was a mechanic in the Army...I remember hanging out with him in the motor pool with him. I also remember helping my mother butcher a goose at a friend's farm one time, and I always helped both my parents gut and fillet fish that we caught. These are memories of my parents doing things with me.
    I also was very proud of the fact that I knew how to change my own oil, spark plugs, tires, battery, and air filter.
  13. by   FireStarterRN
    Yes, I think physicians should be given a break now and then. They really do work long hours. On the other hand, this one sounds like he could be featured on 'Nanny 911'

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