Rode up on first accident outside of hospital.... - page 4

Hey my fellow RN's! I need some advice. I was on my way home from my moma's house and rode up on a car accident. Medics were not on the scene yet. I pull over, get out of my car and head to... Read More

  1. by   green nurse lpn
    um, just out of curiosity, so just RNs can do this? how bout lpns? thank you! i would stop and help just because it's my human nature to do so even if i weren't an lpn... hoping i could make a difference for the better somehow
    Last edit by green nurse lpn on Nov 13, '10
  2. by   OCNRN63
    I don't keep PPE in my car. With the way my hands are chapped, there is simply no way I am going to expose myself to blood/body fluids at an accident scene. Sure, it would be nice if I stopped and helped, not so nice if I wound up with Hep C or HIV as a result.

    Comparing stopping at an accident to a choking person in a restaurant is like the apple v orange comparison.

    I have no idea how this turned into an RN/LPN thing. The OP was an RN. No need to take offense.
  3. by   ChristaRN
    Quote from green nurse lpn
    um, just out of curiosity, so just RNs can do this? how bout lpns? thank you! i would stop and help just because it's my human nature to do so even if i weren't an lpn... hoping i could make a difference for the better somehow

    I don't think anyone said that only RNs can do this at all. I know I as a person would be grateful for whoever would stop and help me and my family, I don't care if it's an RN, LPN, doctor, McDonald's worker, stripper, truck driver, etc etc etc Just do what you feel comfortable with and always keep your safety first!
  4. by   green nurse lpn
    Quote from ChristaRN
    I don't think anyone said that only RNs can do this at all. I know I as a person would be grateful for whoever would stop and help me and my family, I don't care if it's an RN, LPN, doctor, McDonald's worker, stripper, truck driver, etc etc etc Just do what you feel comfortable with and always keep your safety first!
    sorry i misunderstood cause in the beginning of the post it was addressed to RNs hehehe... thank you!
  5. by   Sparrow23
    Goodness, I'm quite surprised that so many of you would not stop, even if no one was at the scene already. It's sad how much fear over legalities and such can take over common sense and common decency.

    It doesn't matter that you do not have the equipment available or even the skills of the EMS. There are still basic things you can do until someone arrives. What if someone needed CPR? Or was bleeding and needed pressure applied? (And of course be careful to protect yourself... that goes without saying.) Goodness, even if they seemed physically ok, do you know how nice it is to just know that someone is there to wait with you until EMS arrives?

    I was in what could have been a very bad accident (spun off many lanes of traffic on the highway, to be stopped by a tree), and it was about 10 min before anyone stopped. My car was totaled but I was fine thank goodness, but you know how grateful I was to this person for just making sure I was ok? He told me he hoped that if his daughter were ever in an accident, that someone would stop to stay with her. And he stayed with me until all the emergency vehicles arrived. He had no healthcare training that I was aware of. He was just a parent who was doing what he would want done for his own kids.
  6. by   shoegalRN
    After sleeping on this issue, I am ok with my issue to stop and make sure all parties were ok.

    Also, I will be checking my BLS book sometime today to go over safety issues when arriving on the scene. I simply did not think about fuel tanks or anything like that, my first concern was the other parties.

    I only regret not staying until EMS arrived, but in the future, I will stop at the scene if this happens again. I will also keep some gloves and shears in my cars from now on.

    I simply can NOT stop if nobody has arrived, that just dont sit well with me. After all, I would want someone to stop and make sure I was ok if it were me.

    Thank you all for your thoughts, suggestions, and opinions. It sure has given me alot of think about.
    Last edit by shoegalRN on Nov 13, '10 : Reason: grammer
  7. by   One2gofst
    It is a personal decision (and perhaps a legal one depending on the jurisdiction) whether to stop or not if you are not on duty. Where I live, even off-duty EMS has no legal obligation to stop. However, should one stop they are required to stay until someone with equal or greater qualifications relieves them.

    I am not an RN, yet, but I am an EMT. I am surprised how many nurses don't have a couple pairs of gloves and a pocket mask in their car. Takes up almost no space and is the most useful PPE. Add shears and a steth and you can do a lot of good for someone.

    I will echo what others have said about scene safety. This has to be your primary concern whenever approaching any situation, whether it be an MVA or someone who was just knocked unconscious by a guy with a bat. It doesn't help anyone if you become another casualty.

    Play these scenarios out in your head and decide what you would do ahead of time. That is going to lead to much better outcomes for all involved than making a snap decision as an accident happens as your driving down the highway at 70mph.
  8. by   ChristineN
    Quote from green nurse lpn
    um, just out of curiosity, so just RNs can do this? how bout lpns? thank you! i would stop and help just because it's my human nature to do so even if i weren't an lpn... hoping i could make a difference for the better somehow
    Umm anyone can stop at an accident and assist, and LPN's, if they chose to assist, should also be protected under the Good Samaritan law.
  9. by   thmpr
    Quote from nursel56
    I feel cheated! But I'm in California which means that likely somebody whined about how hard the course was and they dropped their standards accordingly.
    Baahaha!
  10. by   missdeevah
    Quote from dthfytr
    ...May all your orders be legible and all your patients compliant.
  11. by   tyvin
    If people do a search what will be found is a multitude of various training methods that demonstrate scene assessment for BLS. Depending on your instructor is how you get the training that is a constant with any BLS cert.

    Initial Assessment Video - Introductory CPR Training Videos by ProCPR
  12. by   thmpr
    2727.5. Emergency Care; Immunity from Liability; Gross Negligence, from the nursing practice act, says that a licensed person " ...who in good faith renders emergency care at the scene of an emergency" blah blah " ...shall not be liable for any civil damages." You would have to be "grossly negligent" (grossly unintelligent) to lose a lawsuit. I have serious doubts that any jury would sink a nurse who was genuinely trying to help.

    You don't have to be a medic to stop at an accident scene. An RN is a first responder who obviously has common sense. I totally understand if you don't stop. But if your reason not to stop is because you don't feel qualified, please consider a few first responder precautions: don't park or go anywhere that puts you in danger (use flares); don't leave your keys or your kids in your car, & be sure to lock it; look both ways before crossing the road; don't forget to stay low & slow when approaching inebriated victims; don't approach some creepy dude alone on a dark road; don't accidentally convert yourself with aed; don't play super nurse & attempt transport yourself (just say no to patient care while driving!); don't let the victim have your picnic basket; don't pull someone out of a car unless they will otherwise die (I personally run from fire, but you may be super nurse &/or much braver than I); wear gloves (some people don't shower often); practice universal precautions (don't eat or squirt blood in eyes or open areas of your skin); don't kiss the victim (use a mask!); don't d/c cpr until someone of equal or higher training takes over, or victim has pulse; etc; don't shove food further down choking victims throat. See you already know all of this. You don't need to push ACLS or PALS - just ABC's & maybe an occasional precordial thump if necessary. giggle


    That said, I would like to suggest flipping through the American Heart Associations First Responder book so you can see for yourself that you already know most of what is written. I am not knocking the course. It is great if you want to practice cpr, secure your friends to backboards, get a good review, & learn a few new terms.

    @ OttawaRPN: Yes, I have taken emergency management courses I heard you can take courses online now. Do you know anything about that?

    Disclaimer: The content of this post was not meant to offend. If you are offended please blame my dog.

  13. by   harleyridingirl
    My son and granddaughter were in a head on collision at 5 pm on a busy street. When my son got my granddaughter out of the car, she was dead. A good samaritan stopped and administered CPR to my granddaughter and got her heart beating but he didn't stop until the EMS got there and took over. We ended up loosing her (4.5 years old) due to internal injuries but that good samaritan did a hell of a thing by trying to help and I would love to know who he was and give him a giant hug of appreciation for trying to save my angel.

    So think about that the next time you pass by an accident without stopping.

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