Rn hurt by cold behavior - page 3

hi I have been in nursing for 3 yrs with Bsn 3.5 GPA, also enrolled in fnp program. Recently I got terminated from job bcoz I refused to resign. I haven't done any errors on floors but had to take... Read More

  1. by   OCNRN63
    Quote from brandy1017
    Why don't you qualify for FMLA? IS it because you work part-time (less than 1,000 hrs a year) or because you were a new employee (less than a year)?

    Regardless, collect your unemployment for now and spend the time with your mom! You can always check with the EEOC to find if you have a case for being fired illegally. Even if you don't want your job back you could still possibly get a settlement that would help with expenses. Also consider an attorney.

    My understanding with FMLA is you can use it ongoing or intermittent and it starts with federal. If you exhaust the federal 12 weeks you can also use whatever FLMA your state might offer, which would amount in a possible extension of your FMLA.
    I have never heard of a state extension of FMLA. Do you have a link for that? Isn't that kind of at odds with itself? A federal program being extended by the state?
  2. by   elkpark
    Quote from Esme12
    I am perfectly aware of the FMLA requirement but maybe the OP isn't ...that's why I gave her the link.....
    I apologize, then, for misinterpreting your original post -- it sounded (to me) like you were saying that the OP definitely qualified for FMLA (without any of us knowing the specific circumstances of her employment) and it would be illegal for her employer to refuse to give it to her.
  3. by   Altra
    Quote from brandy1017
    Why don't you qualify for FMLA? IS it because you work part-time (less than 1,000 hrs a year) or because you were a new employee (less than a year)?

    Regardless, collect your unemployment for now and spend the time with your mom! You can always check with the EEOC to find if you have a case for being fired illegally. Even if you don't want your job back you could still possibly get a settlement that would help with expenses. Also consider an attorney.

    My understanding with FMLA is you can use it ongoing or intermittent and it starts with federal. If you exhaust the federal 12 weeks you can also use whatever FLMA your state might offer, which would amount in a possible extension of your FMLA.
    FMLA is a federal program, not one offered by individual states. You might want to be aware of the basics of FMLA, just in case you ever find yourself in a situation where it may be helpful. Esme12's link is a great starting point.
  4. by   Esme12
    Quote from elk park
    I apologize, then, for misinterpreting your original post -- it sounded (to me) like you were saying that the OP definitely qualified for FMLA (without any of us knowing the specific circumstances of her employment) and it would be illegal for her employer to refuse to give it to her.
    No problem......apology accepted.

    It's soooo hard to answer some of these threads when talking about government regulations/requirements when you have to consider federal/state and policy all at the same time AND not knowing the full circumstances. I try to include some of the if's, and, or but's (which is an impossible task) and sometimes I just get lazy and post links to allow people to look it up themselves.......and sometimes I think people should take more initiative and be aware of the regulations that affect their practice and their Lives. But I want to give them the tools to fight for themselves because over the years I feel obligated to let the cat out of the bag that hospitals are filled with cruel intentions and will sell their own mothers if it would save a dollar.....Peace.:heartbeat
  5. by   brandy1017
    Quote from Altra
    FMLA is a federal program, not one offered by individual states. You might want to be aware of the basics of FMLA, just in case you ever find yourself in a situation where it may be helpful. Esme12's link is a great starting point.
    Many states had family leave acts in place before it became a federal law. The individual states acts may be better or worse than the federal law. My understanding is that the state leave piggybacks onto the federal leave, potentially giving you more time off in an emergency. A coworker in WI said this was the case for her!

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