Retraining Displaced Workers As Nurses - page 5

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

When the economy started to slump after the financial meltdown in the U.S. several years ago, masses of displaced workers suddenly began to view nursing as a safe haven. The nursing profession has been a magnet for many... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from brandy1017
    I've read about doctors from foreign countries training to become RN's to come to America because it is apparently very hard to work as a doctor if you were trained in a foreign country. I read about Filipino doctors getting an RN degree in their country to emigrate to America and England. Also there was a program in Florida that trains foreign doctors as nurses to come and work in the hospitals there. I saw this on a news program last year!
    While the media and everyone blathers on about a "nursing shortage" there is also one of physicans especially primary care in many areas of the country. However as the medical community has it's act together when it comes to limiting entry into the profession you don't see the country flooded with both domestic and foregin physicans. Nor do you see new medical programs opening up every other month.

    Nursing OTOH.......

    What the medical community does seem to tolerate are the numbers of foreign students educated at American med schools that later remain to practice as both post grads and full doctors in some urban areas of this country. If it weren't for them the shortage of primary care physicans in many areas would be vastly worse than it tis already.
  2. 6
    I think the powers that be medicare, medicaid and the insurance and hospital industry prefer using NP's to primary care doctors as they can do the same thing at half the cost. So there is no real incentive in expanding primary care physician positions. The truth is nursing is not really a profession, it is really a job. So many nurses don't want to admit it is a job and want to pretend its a profession, but in a profession people have independence, control over their work environment and that is not the case for most nurses. It is a job and in this economy a better paying job than a vast majority of jobs and that is why everyone from the govt to social work to private industry keeps expanding nursing schools. If it were really a profession, the profession would limit the number of schools and create barriers to practice to make sure there isn't an oversupply that will cut wages.
    MBARNBSN, imintrouble, koi310, and 3 others like this.
  3. 0
    WIA provided about 1000 for each semester of LPN school for me (three semesters). I paid the balance.

    There was a long process for getting the WIA grant. First, I had to apply for every other kind of grant and assistance out there before I could even start the WIA process.

    Then I had to be accepted into a specific program and had to create a proposal demonstrating that there was a viable demand for the type of job I was getting trained for. It certainly isn't a nursing-specific program and they don't try to steer you towards nursing or healthcare in any way. It's actually a very good, practical program that can really make a difference in people's lives. I think the work you have to do creating an extensive proposal helps weed out people who aren't really serious about wanting to go to school.

    After graduation they also help provide lots of job seeking help and support. They help with your resume, will provide a computer, printer and proper resume paper if you need it, you can email, fax and make copies there, they will give you pre-addressed envelopes, they hold classes regarding job searching and interview skills etc.
  4. 0
    Quote from dudette10



    What you seem to be saying here is that nursing is viewed by the government and others as a job that anyone can do, so that's why it's chosen as one of the go-to careers for job retraining. Those late night commercials for technical schools list HVAC and medical transcriptionist right next to nursing as "YOUR NEW CAREER!!!" confirm that.

    The amount of responsibility and the seriousness of what we do as nurses refutes that, but the idea persists.
    I think that is the issue with many people. it is a get quick rich scheme that any idiot can do. or so they think........
  5. 2
    Brandy- I didn't do the IT certif program -yet. it will cost aprox $3,500. I went to the information session when I was unemployed in 2010 but I had also went on an interview for another temp position. I started to fill out the papers and ended up taking the temp position. I ended up staying at the temp position for 2 years- total out of acute care, a primary care clinic and I totally love the job. it was very little clinical nursing. But, it was temp and it ended. Now I am back to the old unemployment thing again.I have been out of acute care for 2 years, I guess that doesn't make my experience recent in today's hospital's HR terms but I found out _ I don't care, The hospitals can keep their old slave laborpoop fest positions, I am now spoiled. let the CEO's wife do it!! I don't ever want to go back to the acute care bedside again. That is going to be a whole other wrinkle to this "old nurses out" thing- When they kicked us out of the hospitals we are finding life is good and we like it. There's going to be a rude awakenig for these hospitals- The experienced nurses are not coming back. We have seen other areas of nursing that are not clinical and don't involve the twisted mind set of the hospital nursing managment. I'm tired of scrubs- I want to wear Ann Taylor.

    I haven't forgot about the IT thing- It just hasn't been affordable. In the next years I will see how it goes and maybe work a non clinical position and partially collect Social Security If I can- I'm not sure, I need to do some more investigating. I just know I have had it- micromanaging and nit picking is not for me.
    2BRN123 and brandy1017 like this.
  6. 0
    And as long as people see that one can become an RN with an associates degree why should they not assume that anyone could do it (of course they have NO IDEA of the intensity of the work after you're in the program)? We will be lumpted together with other lightly educated pale blue collar jobs.
  7. 0
    Quote from animal1953
    I am a displaced worker (shipping,receiving/warehousing) that benefited from a program to retrain as a nurse. I just passed my state boards for my CNA and am starting the long slog of looking for a position. I deceided to become a nurse after taking care of my wife post stroke (ischemic stroke, hemmorragic stroke, tia's, swallow problems) recovery. It has been ten years during this journey through her recovery that gave me many aquired skills in basic nursing. I was encouraged by visiting nurses and doctors to persue this line of work. On my side, I have asthma (since 6 months of age) and battle high blood pressure. As you can see, I have a general well rounded experience in the medical care field. Tying all these skills together just seemed to be a natural course for me, one I have embraced and am excited to jump into.
    No disrespect intended but you're not a nurse and to represent yourself as a nurse in patient-care situations is illegal. Don't jeopardize the work you put in to get your CNA.
  8. 0
    Quote from kcmylorn
    Now I am back to the old unemployment thing again.
    This leads me to another comment. . .

    Nursing is attracting displaced workers from other fields, and at the same time, has displaced certain older nurses from the profession. It's ironic.
  9. 0
    Regarding retraining into STEM fields....THOSE fields are ripe with outsourcing! I did IT for 18 yrs. I got laid off every 2 to 3 yrs during that period of time. My retraining into nursing was paid for by the state of Florida (Worksource). You can't send nursing care to a foreign country. Yes, you can bring foreigners IN, but you can't send the job out. This keeps work here. Now with honesty (hah) in talking to the Government, a glut of nurses looking for jobs should eliminate the H1B visas allowing foreign nurses to work here. We would have to hire our own.

    Yes, older nurses stayed or returned to rebuild their retirement accts. If they LEFT their $ in stocks (which caused them to lose so much), most of it would have returned at this point. (DJIA et al were 13 - 14K, dropped to 9K and back up to 12 - 13K) Once rebuilt, older nurses should take the advice of changing their portfolios to stable bonds so this never happens again. Since I entered the workforce in the 80s the financial planners always said, "stocks in the early years, stocks + bonds in the middle years, bonds at the end." It may have been hard to take your portfolio out of a system that was earning over 10% per annum in stocks and transition to lower yielding bonds.....but, you risked losing $ if you didn't. They didn't and they lost.

    At some point, the body gives out. Those older nurses will retire. We will need to replace them at some point.
  10. 2
    i have not read all postings; i apologize if i repeat what others may have said.

    i would just start by saying this “let us just turn the table around” for the sake of fairness. supposing i was a displaced nurse having a chance to get retrained in a teaching education program even though it was not easy to get into a teaching job but it was easier than to get into a nursing profession and it would give me “big bucks?” i have the wisdom, intelligence and the ambition to do the teaching program. would not i be unwise to take advantage of the opportunity? opportunity after all is not only for a handful some, it is for all.
    chriskelly and doni718 like this.


Top