Professional Attire for Nurses - page 3

Hello everyone, I would just like everyone's opinion on what you think professional attire should be for nurses and what are the requirements at the facility in which you work. Do you think... Read More

  1. by   VA_CCRC
    I absolutely love the idea of all white. Whites are crisp, refreshing and are often easily recognizable for patients. HOWEVER, they just aren't practical. Whether it be a slosh of coffee from your travel mug on the way to work, a splash of a body fluid (take your pick!) while emptying a drain....or just a simple ink pen that decided to leak in your pocket...by the end of the day you and your 'whites' soon turn into an artists canvas! I prefer scrubs, wash & wear!
    Lets talk about ACCESSORIES! Can anyone say Mr T? I am still amazed as to how many nurses wear excess jewelry (not to mention the one who wear heavy perfumes).
    It should be simple. A clean, uncluttered professional look and ATTITUDE is all you need!!
  2. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Miss Saigon:
    Do you get RESPECT by what color you wear??
    I have to EARN my RESPECT, Society obviously still thinks that intelligence is based on apperarance, not on knowledge!! When you introduce yourself to a patient with your name and title, there should be no question of who you are. As far as those of you that state your scubs are wrinkled or look like pajamas, use an iron or get ones that fit.
    By wearing cheerful scubs you convey A LOT about who you are. If we all wear the same color we lose our sense of individuality.

    Just to clarify - I am not allowed to "get my own scrubs" I have to wear what the hospital provides me because I work in L&D. The hospital launders them - and they only provide size medium as the smallest size. They come back from laundry wrinkled. Unfortunately they don't provide us with irons and frankly we all wouldn't have time to iron them before our shift. This is why I hate scrubs. I realize other nurses actually OWN thiers and can iron them ,etc but I don't have that option. So, on my unit, with these scrubs, we all look VERY unprofessional. We act professionally, but we look like we crawled out of a bag. We've complained about this, but no one cares. This is just what we have.
  3. by   NurseMark
    Originally posted by kday:
    Okay, y'all are going to shoot me for this, but I think it would be a good idea for nurses to go back to the 'old days' of wearing all white, caps, white hose, the whole nine. Yes, the colorful scrubs are great...COMFORTABLE...and patients seem to be cheered by them. HOWEVER, I have heard from several nurses about units that had days where the nurses dressed in the all white garb and wore caps...the patients LOVED it. I have worked with a couple of nurses who refused to give up their whites and caps, and let me tell you...they got SO much respect from patients and staff alike!

    Okay, you all can let me have it now...
    Olright Kday...

    And I am saying this jokingly. As a straight male nurse, wearing a gay white nursing cap on my head would be a little much. I did work at a place requiring an all white uniform. they let males wear white jeans, a white scrub top, and a white warmer jacket. White is not my color, but it looked professional and everyone knew I was a Nurse. The pin idea though is the best I've heard so far.

  4. by   JennieBSN
    Okay, to all you dudes out there...specifically, EMT125, Chris, and NurseMark...YES, YOU WOULD LOOK QUITE ODD IN A CAP!!! Hee hee! Sorry, I sometimes forget that there are y chromosomes in this profession. I work with strictly chicks. No disrespect meant! But you have to admit, you'd all look pretty cute in a skirt and support hose....
  5. by   saskrn
    My RN husband does not find the dress and cap idea appealing. Although, he does have nice legs!! But maybe a little hairy!!
  6. by   Chris-FNP
    I think I'm going to start wearing a cap, a white skirt, and thong underwear. Now that's a male nurse!!!

    (kidding...really kidding)

    ;-)

    Chris
  7. by   Dplear
    Chris...don't forget the short skirt and black bra to go with it....but me being 6 foot tall and about 250...I probably would need a white MUMU (spelling?)...but then again as i tell my wife...I only will wear the dress every other weekend...and this AINT the weekend...(but I do got a damn fine ass...if I may say so myself..LOL)
  8. by   Brownms46
    Gee, some of these posts brought back memories! I can remember tryng to find white hose, when it white was not in fashion, and having to run from store to store looking for them. I remember having to starch, and iron that cap, and trying to find bobby pins to secure it. I remember having to have a nice white dress uniform, that you would use to go to staff meeting during the day, or to an interview. The dress had to be at your knees. I remember having to wear either a white, or navy blue cardigan sweater. The top of your uniform had to come to your hips. Your shoes had to be polished, and your foot totally enclosed. I remember a doc, who did TV spots on the local news, who filled in one Saturday at the HMO I was working at. There was no one but him, and me, working. He spilled betadine on his new stark white lab coat, and was ready to LEAVE the pts, and ME! I had to show him, that peroxide would take out the betadine with no problem. It wasn't until he saw the betadine dissolving, that he calmed down, and went on seeing pts. ..LOL. Wasn't funny at the time though. Give me my scrubs, which I starch, and iron, except for where they're provided by the hospital. Then I look like I'm homeless. I have had a friend of mine's husband ask me why I wore my PJ all the time.

    Brownie
  9. by   gpip
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Susy K:
    [B]
    True respect doesn't come with clothing. I think TRUE dress casual (meaning, not a business suit, but dress pants and blouse or sweater, or what Chris FNP wears, would be most desirable for me.
    Nurses that work in Mental Health don't wear scrubby scrubs. They wear dress casual....

    Come on Mental health Nurses are not upto their elbows in s**t all day. and besides the reason they wear casual close to be able to better relate and not intimidate the patients, not because they are comfortable. scrubs are probably the most practical form of dress for the bedside nurse. If you do not want to wear scrubs, get away from the bed side. pretty simple to me.
  10. by   Q.
    [quote]Originally posted by gpip:
    [b]
    Originally posted by Susy K:

    True respect doesn't come with clothing. I think TRUE dress casual (meaning, not a business suit, but dress pants and blouse or sweater, or what Chris FNP wears, would be most desirable for me.
    Nurses that work in Mental Health don't wear scrubby scrubs. They wear dress casual....

    .. the reason they wear casual close to be able to better relate and not intimidate the patients,
    If you do not want to wear scrubs, get away from the bed side. pretty simple to me.
    Your above statement proves my point. "etter relate to and not intimidate patients"- that would be nice.

    Hey now.....I think the shortage is severe enough; you don't want ANOTHER nurse to walk away.
    I LIKE the bedside, but is there something wrong with wanting scrubs that FIT PROPERLY???? And are PRESSED??????

    About mental health nurses; I think they would argue that they are indeed up to thier arms in fluids sometimes: vomitus from detox patients, feces from schizophrenic patients. I know, my friend works Mental Health.
  11. by   JKHLPN
    I think wearing white is totally old-school. All of my uniforms come with matching shoes, and my patients love it. I get the same respect, not because I am in white, but because I am a nurse. My uniforms are pressed, and well fitting. Besides, I know nurses who wear white, and it's yellow/dingy. Let's talk about shoes, how many of you nurses walk around with filthy white shoes. That's gross, and it's unprofessional. Dr Sholls at K-mart only cost 20 dollars. By the way, I even have orange nursing clogs with a matching orange nursing uniform.
  12. by   Lisa - RN
    I literally DREAM of wearing something more smart or professional looking. Like Susy K, we are issued uniforms, 5 pairs of tops/pants, but we choose to either bring them home to wash, or the facility will wash for us. All nursing staff - that is, UAP's, aides, LPN's, RN's, etc. - wear the same thing: this solid colored smurfy blueish-teal getup. Only our badges identify our "rank". We cannot even wear a sweater or something over this issued uniform as it would detract from what we are (i.e., interns couldn't yell down the hall and say "hey you, nurse"). The only item of clothing we may choose is our sock color. Let me tell you, wearing the same thing day in and day out gets mighty old. Of course the travel or agency nurses get to wear whatever they like. I was also told under no circumstances could we wear a lab coat...heaven forbid a patient mistook us for an intern or resident!! In my opinion, just another method of keeping nurses in check.
  13. by   realnursealso/LPN
    Originally posted by NurseMark:
    Olright Kday...

    And I am saying this jokingly. As a straight male nurse, wearing a gay white nursing cap on my head would be a little much. I did work at a place requiring an all white uniform. they let males wear white jeans, a white scrub top, and a white warmer jacket. White is not my color, but it looked professional and everyone knew I was a Nurse. The pin idea though is the best I've heard so far.

    OMG MARK...ROTFLMAO....I am laughing so hard and can't stop thinking of you wearing a cap pinned to your head....sorry...just can't stop laughing.


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