Please take this questionaire before you apply for a job

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    Recently, I've been looking for a new job and I have come across something interesting that I thought I'd ask all you wonderful folks if you'd ever come across such a thing. It is a questionaire or quiz or survey type thing that asks all kind of questions about how emotions are handled in the work place, how often you have "unscheduled" absenses, how you handle workplace disputes, etc... they require you to have passing score in order for applications to be considered.

    Has anyone else come across these type of "tests"?
    Last edit by Manatee111 on Jan 9, '10 : Reason: Mispelling
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  5. 0
    Yeah, I had to take one for a position I applied to. It seemed to be a personality type questionaire. At least it did tell me rather quickly (within a day or two) that I passed and that my application was being considered.
  6. 0
    Quote from Hands&Feet
    Yeah, I had to take one for a position I applied to. It seemed to be a personality type questionaire. At least it did tell me rather quickly (within a day or two) that I passed and that my application was being considered.

    Same here.
  7. 0
    I've had to take "tests" like that a few different times (so far) for potential employers -- they required it of all applicants.
  8. 0
    I had to do one of these for my job I just got. But a few years back my son had to take those type of tests for several of the minimum wage jobs he applied for. McDonalds in this area usese one of these tests. Not sure how much they help in weeding out people.
  9. 0
    I actually have quite a bit of insight to this test.
    Apparently it is used by several worker's compensation companies that require their insured companies to use it as a pre-employment screener.
    According to them it can tell you whether or not someone is liable to file a Worker's Comp claim and what their ethical and moral standings are in coming to work for you. (It can also be used to tell if an employee may file a civil claim against you in the future as well.)
    Personally I don't think they do all that good. At my last job that I just left we used it. One of the gals who passed it (come to find out through references checks) has a long history of filing worker's comp claims. Who knows?
  10. 0
    I had to take one recently, but it was crazy. The questions were "do you enjoy cleaning up after parties?" "Do you often help clean up after parties" "do you sometimes like to make bets to make things more interesting at work?" "Do you like to have competitions to see who can get more work done?"

    I am sure this survey didn't help me. I couldn't help overanalyze it. I don't really enjoy cleaning up after parties. I rarely do it but mostly because I'm old and can't even remember the last time I WENT to a party nevermind stayed until it was over. Were they trying to find out if I am cooperative, or if I'm a partier? As for the betting one, are they trying to figure out if I find innovative ways to motivate my fellow employees, or if I'm a compulsive gambler?

    Whatever they wanted, they never call me when I apply there.
  11. 0
    When I interviewed for my job, I was told that many of the interviewer's questions were computer-generated based on my answers on the questionnaire. It helps determine if you will be a good fit for a particular organization in terms of mission, philosophy, etc. and also helps focus the interview. I actually WASN'T asked, 'where do you see yourself in 5 years?' which I've been asked in EVERY interview prior to that one!
  12. 1
    Quote from teeniebert
    I actually WASN'T asked, 'where do you see yourself in 5 years?' which I've been asked in EVERY interview prior to that one!
    I think that maybe administrative/management types have figured out that nearly everyone knows (and gives) the "right" answers to the traditional, obvious nursing interview questions (like the classic you quote ), so they are no longer useful. So, the trend toward using these psychology-based questionnaires that ask a lot of seemingly random questions that have nothing to do with nursing or your experience or credentials, but supposedly offer insight into your character and values and how you will perform as an employee.

    Of course, as nearly anyone in psychology or psychiatry will tell you, mental health professionals (and the instruments they develop) are very good at explaining past behavior, but v. bad at predicting future behavior ...
    teeniebert likes this.


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