One huge reason I want to be a nurse - page 3

by mrnightinggale | 5,434 Views | 38 Comments

OK. So I'm probably pretty atypical for a nursing student. I am a retired USAF aviator after 22 years and probably don't HAVE to do much of anything more with my life. I'm 46 and decided it is too early to "hang up my spurs". ... Read More


  1. 3
    Quote from mrnightinggale
    My wife is a Med/Surg RN-BSN so, I understand some of your perspectives. Can't say I totally understand it until I am there, but I hear lots of good stories along with the bad. I guess the luxury I have is that after I get a bit of experience in, I won't have any qualms throwing the BS flag. In all honesty, I really don't NEED this job and won't be afraid to tell people that under certain conditions. I've briefed 4-star generals. I am not easily intimidated. I guess they either will or won't like me.
    For me what makes it suck is the fact that it's a role and a job, where, if you like it or the area, and you bust arse and are good at it, there are these idiotic people that just have to pile on political and other things that start to make the suck factor way too much for the time, energy, and money. I had hoped that having more men come into it would make a difference, but it hasn't. That's because the men are still low in the numbers, and they take on this whole, if you can't beat em, join em mentality. So you have men that take on the petty bs and stupid female politics in order to fit into the "culture."

    No offense, but women are often so damn reactionary and catty and punitive. You deal with it in other jobs; but in healthcare, where you are stressing about more important things, you just get sick of the other nonsense. It's too much uncessary insult and injury added to a job where you are constantly forced to try and please everyone. It's really kind of nuts.
    Szasz_is_Right, Fiona59, and netglow like this.
  2. 10
    The last line was if you could walk in their shoes, feel what they feel, would you treat them differently. My answer: No. If I'm not giving the best care possible, it isn't because I lack empathy, its because I lack support from my workplace, lack proper staffing.....Ridiculous. The video makers it sound like "we only hire compassionate, empathetic people." As opposed to the rest of us who supposedly don't care about our patients? I don't need a video to make me stop and think about what a patient must be going through. I'm not a sociopath. I already posess empathy. SMH
    Sammie7, roser13, Fiona59, and 7 others like this.
  3. 8
    I wish I listened to other nurses that forewarned me about going into nursing! Shadow a nurse for a day, or maybe several nurses on different units in different hospitals just to see what you are getting yourself into. But also keep in mind that shadowing is a lot different from being the one with the license that you worked very hard to attain and work very hard every day to maintain. You are personally accountable for the safety and lives of your pts. You will be under the constant, close scrutiny of your peers, your pts, their families, and your managers who will audit your documentation to death. You will be so busy on the job you wont have time to put yourself in other people's shoes... and you may just start to resent others who dont put themselves in yours! I would say I am a compassionate person, but the only time I have to express that compassion is by putting a little more sense of urgency on myself to get my pt's their pain meds a little more sooner, to get them an extra blanket right away while I have a second to do it before I forget and get distracted by something else with more priority. I would really weigh the pros and cons before you invest money in your nursing education.
  4. 4
    Quote from mrnightinggale
    My wife is a Med/Surg RN-BSN so, I understand some of your perspectives. Can't say I totally understand it until I am there, but I hear lots of good stories along with the bad. I guess the luxury I have is that after I get a bit of experience in, I won't have any qualms throwing the BS flag. In all honesty, I really don't NEED this job and won't be afraid to tell people that under certain conditions. I've briefed 4-star generals. I am not easily intimidated. I guess they either will or won't like me.
    Do not pass go then, buddy - in all seriousness.
    Szasz_is_Right, jmll1765, roser13, and 1 other like this.
  5. 7
    I got 99 problems at the understaffed, over regulated nursing home I work at......

    But a lack of empathy ain't one of them.
    SleeepyRN, jmll1765, Sun0408, and 4 others like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from mrnightinggale
    My wife is a Med/Surg RN-BSN so, I understand some of your perspectives. Can't say I totally understand it until I am there, but I hear lots of good stories along with the bad. I guess the luxury I have is that after I get a bit of experience in, I won't have any qualms throwing the BS flag. In all honesty, I really don't NEED this job and won't be afraid to tell people that under certain conditions. I've briefed 4-star generals. I am not easily intimidated. I guess they either will or won't like me.
    Thanks for the video. I, too, and making a drastic career change to go into nursing but have all ideas both of us will do just fine.
  7. 8
    I understand where the video is coming from but where is the compassion on the patients' end? Is that awful to say because of what they are going through? Probably.. but I am sick of patients yelling at me for things I cannot control. I am sorry you are in pain, tired, sick of waiting for whatever you are waiting for but you are not the only person in the hospital. You are waiting for your MRI because someone else is in there. I am not holding out on you, I am waiting for the doctor to write an order. You are tired because we keep "bothering" you with vitals and tests? I am sorry, GO HOME if you don't want us in your room.

    Wow, I sound terrible. I swear I have compassion, empathy, and treat all my patients with respect but sometimes my job makes me hate the human kind.

    ETA: Luckily I encounter nice, appreciative more often than the ones described above.
    Last edit by PediLove2147 on Mar 25, '13
    Sammie7, Surprised1, SleeepyRN, and 5 others like this.
  8. 1
    Ah, I love it
    mrnightinggale likes this.
  9. 2
    Quote from joanna73
    Maybe it's me too...I couldn't finish watching this clip. Not because it struck a chord with me in any way, just too cheesy and sentimental.
    I only skimmed through it.

    Cheese? I was thiniking it was more like drinking the Kool-Aide.

    But as someone else said where is the patients compassion for us. I remember one transplant recipient complaining that the transplant was being done on the long weekend and they'd had plans! Simple, refuse it and let it go to somebody who will appreciate the time, effort, expensive, and ultimate sacrifice some other family made for you to be as lucky as to get the spare parts!
    Szasz_is_Right and roser13 like this.
  10. 3
    It is cheesy, to be sure.

    But there is an underlying truth there that is easy to lose sight of in the midst of the chaos, the sh!+, the complaining, the manipulation, etc.

    I thought about this video last night. I had a patient who was/is a complete troll, who stunk to high heaven, who didn't even have the courtesy not blow his foul breath right in my face, blowing his nose on the linens, etc... who had CHF due to a life of abusing himself. Of course his veins were horribly sclerosed and his numerous abscesses made it hard to even get a repeatable blood pressure.

    While not the shiny-happy images from the video, I took myself back to a time when he was 2 or 3 (and probably having the groundwork already laid for the life he presently lives). I tried to think of him as the person he might have become sans the addiction and myriad other social issues. I don't know his story, nor do I want to. I'd be not surprised, however, if there weren't some heart-wrenching parts of it way back when.

    I tried to think of him in empathetic terms not so much for him but for my own mental health. I can be extremely negative and critical - probably more so than most who've read this far. Part of it is nature (that red-hair gene, you know) and part acquired in early life experiences. Pushing fifty, however, I recognize how much influence I have over my attitude and demeanor and I am so much happier when I can find something good in the people that I'm choosing to serve - even if I have to fabricate it.

    There was nothing shiny about this troll, and I've rarely been more happy to get a bed assignment, but trying to see him through a filter
    like this video was helpful for me.
    AnonRNC, mrnightinggale, and dishes like this.


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