Nursing specialty that requires minimum patient contact and best hours?

  1. 0
    Please list your experience or knowledge of specific nursing specialties that have minimum patient contact (code brown, c-dif, etc), and what specialty provides the best hours? For instance working in a hospital versus a clinic? Thanks.
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  3. 115 Comments so far...

  4. 39
    There are dozens of threads on AN started by people who want the title of nurse but not the learning involved in doing the actual job; this is generally related to immaturity, inexperience, mistaken ideas about what nurses are and do, and inability to see humans as needing the help that nurses give. I am sure you can search them out.

    Short answer: There are plenty of nursing occupations that don't have anything to do with physical patient care, but you're sure not going to be qualified for them right out of school. When people want to hire nurses to use the background and experience acquired as an RN, they want people who actually have it.
    Been there,done that, MauraRN, HouTx, and 36 others like this.
  5. 12
    Quote from GrnTea
    There are dozens of threads on AN started by people who want the title of nurse but not the learning involved in doing the actual job; this is generally related to immaturity, inexperience, mistaken ideas about what nurses are and do, and inability to see humans as needing the help that nurses give. I am sure you can search them out.

    Short answer: There are plenty of nursing occupations that don't have anything to do with physical patient care, but you're sure not going to be qualified for them right out of school. When people want to hire nurses to use the background and experience acquired as an RN, they want people who actually have it.
    This^^ (very diplomatic as well!)
    janfrn, poppycat, OCNRN63, and 9 others like this.
  6. 18
    Retired. ;-). Otherwise, plan to pay your dues or pick another profession.
  7. 6
    I am assuming that you are either still in school or are a new grad. You will be lucky to find ANY job, so keep this in mind. Most new grads are having trouble finding work in the hospital setting, let alone anything that would be a M-F, 9-5 with little patient encounters. The days of new nurses being able to choose wherever they want to work are over. You will most likely need to get a couple of years experience on the floor (and yes, there will be a lot of isolation patients, cleaning patients, bathing patients, etc). As for good hours, again, you have to pay your dues. If you work in the hospital, it will most likely be 12 hour shifts, and working every other weekend and holiday. After a few years experience, then go back to school for CRNA or NP... although these programs are very competitive and require a lot of work, not to mention becoming saturated as everyone has decided that they want to go these routes. I am curious why one would consider going into nursing when knowing they are going to have to have patient contact and deal with bodily fluids?
    Lina_V, loriangel14, Marisette, and 3 others like this.
  8. 20
    Please pick another profession. Nursing need nurses who actually give patient care.
  9. 6
    Quote from crazy&cuteRN
    Please pick another profession.
    I disagree...
    Nursing need nurses who actually give patient care.
    New grads need to have less competition for the acute-care jobs that most of them want... and folks with attitudes like this help dilute the field of competition.
    I love my cat!, RNOTODAY, Lina_V, and 3 others like this.
  10. 7
    I am sure you're not pushing us to make the inference that others should step aside so the new grads can take the jobs they don't really want to keep for more than a year or so.

    If you are referring to the new grads of one-two years ago who are now pursuing NP or CRNA school well, we know the vast majority of them aren't all going to get into those programs, so they are still here and here we are: with nurses who don't want to nurse.

    However, all is not lost. A fair number of them will, in fact, discover something in nursing to like and even love where they least expect it, pretty much as we did.
    MauraRN, Altra, Retired APRN, and 4 others like this.
  11. 11
    I'm just confused about why anyone would bother with the torture of nursing school if they didn't want patient contact. If that's the way you feel, become a librarian, teacher, CPA, lawyer, etc. etc. And you most definitely will deal with code browns and other unpleasantness in school. I'll never forget the day I had a patient on a specialty bed, in isolation, who'd gotten Kayexalate just before my clinical. I filled up a linen hamper with nothing but poopy draw sheets and gowns (no ground sheet on the specialty beds). And I did 90% of those highly unpleasant clean ups by myself because he was in isolation. 18 years ago, and I still remember it like it was yesterday.
  12. 8
    And it didn't kill you, and you are still a nurse.
    sharpeimom, poppycat, Lina_V, and 5 others like this.


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