Nursing Pay

  1. 2
    alright, i've read more than one argument around here about more experienced nurses saying that they are tired of new nurses complaining about their pay. after all new nurses get paied more than they did when they were new, right?

    well i did some minimal research and i'm going to say no! to that statement. new nurses do not get paied more than experienced nurses did when they were new. and i would also argue that new nurses, especially those with a bsn, paied more than the experienced nurse did for his/her degree.

    so let me try to lay this out for everyone on even terms...

    the year is 1990
    for a 2 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $4,400
    in 2011 terms that is about: $7,600

    for a 4 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $11,600
    in 2011 terms that is about: $20,100

    average nurse pay in 1990: $12 - $21 an hour
    in 2011 terms: $20 - $36

    the year is 2011
    for a 2 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $7,000

    for a 4 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $32,900

    according to the bureau of labor statictics 2010 nursing pay ranged between
    $21 per hour up to $45 per hour with a median of $31 an hour

    in 1990 terms this is a rang of $12 per hour up to $25 an hour with a median of $18 per hour.

    *note*
    1) the prices above are only for the average tuition cost. the sums do not include housing, books, or extra fees.
    2) i would also note that in general an asn has to take at least one year of prerequisits prior to starting a nursing program...this cost was not added into the 2 year degree sum.



    resources:
    us department of education. paying for college: the changes between 1990 and 2000 full-time dependent undgergraduates. 2004
    http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2004/2004075.pdf

    dollartimes.com. inflation calculator. http://www.dollartimes.com/calculators/inflation.htm

    minniasota department of heath. rual health primary care. feburary 2001. http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/o.../rnprofile.pdf

    collage board. what it costs to go to college. 2011. http://www.collegeboard.com/student/pay/add-it-up/4494.html

    bureau of labor statistics. occupational employment and wages 2010, registered nurses. http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291111.htm
    PMFB-RN and joanna73 like this.

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  2. 21 Comments...

  3. 8
    Sadly, your well thought out thread has lost some credibility because you did not use the spell check. (paied)

    I always assumed that employers adjusted for inflation, and never felt new nurse wages were any less than the usual dismal wages paid all the way around.

    The cost of 2 year versus 4 year degrees is comparing apples to oranges in the pay scale scenario.
    Initially, the pay rate is very close, however, the additional preparation will soon be a standard requirement and opens the door to many more opportunities.

    The big issue here is, none of us are paid what we're worth!
    Guttercat, brandy1017, joanna73, and 5 others like this.
  4. 0
    Interesting! I have no opinion about the topic, but I did enjoy reading your post.
  5. 2
    Don't forget ... back in 1990, very few new grads received the new grad internships/residencies that new grads are expecting to receive today. To be fair, you have to include the cost of those educational programs as part of their compensation. That would add $10,000 - $20,000 to the current 1st year compensation figures. (The cost of current programs - the cost of the old-style orientations.)
    KalipsoRed21 and HouTx like this.
  6. 0
    Whoops, check comment below!
  7. 0
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Sadly, your well thought out thread has lost some credibility because you did not use the spell check. (paied)

    I always assumed that employers adjusted for inflation, and never felt new nurse wages were any less than the usual dismal wages paid all the way around.

    The cost of 2 year versus 4 year degrees is comparing apples to oranges in the pay scale scenario.
    Initially, the pay rate is very close, however, the additional preparation will soon be a standard requirement and opens the door to many more opportunities.

    The big issue here is, none of us are paid what we're worth!
    Someone must always come in a thread and belittle another, it goes without fail. Sadly, the original poster did not use spell check but you also did not check your attitude at the door. You are dismissed!
  8. 1
    Quote from kalipsored21
    alright, i've read more than one argument around here about more experienced nurses saying that they are tired of new nurses complaining about their pay. after all new nurses get paied more than they did when they were new, right?

    well i did some minimal research and i'm going to say no! to that statement. new nurses do not get paied more than experienced nurses did when they were new. and i would also argue that new nurses, especially those with a bsn, paied more than the experienced nurse did for his/her degree.

    so let me try to lay this out for everyone on even terms...

    the year is 1990
    for a 2 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $4,400
    in 2011 terms that is about: $7,600

    for a 4 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $11,600
    in 2011 terms that is about: $20,100

    average nurse pay in 1990: $12 - $21 an hour
    in 2011 terms: $20 - $36

    the year is 2011
    for a 2 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $7,000

    for a 4 year degree at a public institution the average person spent: $32,900

    according to the bureau of labor statictics 2010 nursing pay ranged between
    $21 per hour up to $45 per hour with a median of $31 an hour

    in 1990 terms this is a rang of $12 per hour up to $25 an hour with a median of $18 per hour.

    *note*
    1) the prices above are only for the average tuition cost. the sums do not include housing, books, or extra fees.
    2) i would also note that in general an asn has to take at least one year of prerequisits prior to starting a nursing program...this cost was not added into the 2 year degree sum.



    resources:
    us department of education. paying for college: the changes between 1990 and 2000 full-time dependent undgergraduates. 2004
    http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2004/2004075.pdf

    dollartimes.com. inflation calculator. http://www.dollartimes.com/calculators/inflation.htm

    minniasota department of heath. rual health primary care. feburary 2001. http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/o.../rnprofile.pdf

    collage board. what it costs to go to college. 2011. http://www.collegeboard.com/student/pay/add-it-up/4494.html

    bureau of labor statistics. occupational employment and wages 2010, registered nurses. registered nurses*
    re: "new nurses do not get paid more than experienced nurses did when they were new"... i am in my 5th year of employment with my current employer. i have had minimal raises for the past 3 years and the hospital has no market adjustments for current employees. the new grads we've just hired came in making basically what i am making now. the new grad starting rate has been adjusted but the current rn rate has not. and if you take into consideration the inflation rate in the past 5 years (from the site you posted), i have basically gotten $1/hr raise in these 5 years combined. and if you convert the new grad's current rate to 2007 dollars, it is still more than i came in making.
    awheat likes this.
  9. 2
    While this is comparing apples to oranges, let me share the perspective of a Canadian nurse, just so you have an idea. Canadian nurses are required to obtain the BSN as minimum entry to practice. There are no 2 year programs anymore, and many experienced RNs are returning to school if they want to compete in the market.We are unionized across the country, allowing for fair pay, benefits, and working conditions for everyone. 27 to 50 dollars per hour is the range for RNs plus differentials. While new grads generally experience orientation periods, the starting pay is at least 27 per hour. For the level and skill expected of even your new grads, anything less than 27 an hour in the year 2012 is very difficult to live on, especially when people have loans.Aside from a few states, many American nurses are not paid even close to what they're worth. It's very unfortunate.
    Guttercat and KalipsoRed21 like this.
  10. 0
    while this is comparing apples to oranges, let me share the perspective of a canadian nurse, just so you have an idea. canadian nurses are required to obtain the bsn as minimum entry to practice. there are no 2 year programs anymore,


    *** just wondering. does canada use the three year bsn program like new zealand does? if so is that three year from high school graduation or is there a year of classes that must be taken before one can apply to the bsn program as is the case with most us associates degree programs. i worked in new zealand as an rn and in discussing nursing education with my co-workers discovered that my adn program was very similar in length and scope to their bsn program, however i experienced a far, far lower level of responsibility as a nurse in nz as compared th usa.

    and many experienced rns are returning to school if they want to compete in the market.we are unionized across the country, allowing for fair pay, benefits, and working conditions for everyone. 27 to 50 dollars per hour is the range for rns


    *** is that in canadian dollars?

    plus differentials. while new grads generally experience orientation periods, the starting pay is at least 27 per hour. for the level and skill expected of even your new grads, anything less than 27 an hour in the year 2012 is very difficult to live on, especially when people have loans.aside from a few states, many american nurses are not paid even close to what they're worth. it's very unfortunate.

    *** on that we certainly agree.
  11. 6
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Sadly, your well thought out thread has lost some credibility because you did not use the spell check. (paid)!
    *** Absolutely false. The OP loses none of her credibility as a result of a typo or two. Her post is well though out and makes a good point.


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