Nurses are Pathetic!! - page 22

I have been reading thread after thread on this forum and I have come to one conclusion. We are all a pathetic bunch. We take abuse that most other human beings would not put up with. We are... Read More

  1. by   Warpster
    I don't think "pathetic" is quite the right word, as I'm sure the flamefest so far has demonstrated. "Overly dedicated" might be a bit better.

    Working conditions like the ones you described so neatly are the reason 50% of the trained RNs in this country are no longer practicing. Those working conditions are certainly why I've left.

    Throwing more money at us while reducing staffing, increasing responsibility, overworking, and looking the other way when we're abused or even assaulted is not going to work. Even if nursing were paid at pro sports or rock star levels, there's no way I'd go back.

    Only by organizing can we ever hope to get reasonable working conditions. The problem seems to be that too many nurses think "union" means sweaty guys in wifebeater shirts driving trucks. Maybe if we called it a "guild?"

    In any case, unionization = better working conditions. Pass it on.
  2. by   BillEDRN
    Quote from lupin
    Lorster,
    Honey, if you think a doctor yelling at you is bad, try working Walmart during the Christmas season. You will find whole new ways of hating the human race. Looking back at some of the things I had to endure as a dept. manager at Walmart makes me wish I had just punched some people in the face and been done with it. To this day, I shop online at the holidays because I actually get claustrophobic in the malls and Walmart.
    As for what was written, there is some truth to Lorster's rant. But, for heaven's sakes people, GET OVER YOURSELVES!!!!
    While lots of nurses are ranting and raving about how much they hate their job and how much they're getting screwed, your pts are the ones who are sick, getting really screwed by their insurance companies (they are the real evil in healthcare!), losing money from not being able to work, separated from their loved ones, in pain, and now they have an overworked, underappreciated, self pitying nurse standing over them with the enthusiasm of a prisoner in jail taking a shower. OH JOY!!!!
    Most of us got into nursing because we love taking care of people and making them feel better. What happened to that? What is with this site these days? All I've seen is negativity. No one seems to have a sense of humor or compassion or duty or anything lately. I'm giving this site two weeks to get out of it's funk or I'm leaving it for a while.
    And to those people who agree with Lorster about everything and can't seem to find something good at your job, LEAVE IT! Not all of us feel that way and quite frankly, I'd rather work short than hear a bunch of b*tching while I'm trying to do my job.
    Well, get used to working short! It is nurses like you, who think that anyone who is used by the system to the point that they can't take it anymore (i.e burnout) should leave instead of voicing legitimate concerns and feelings about their work environment. The irony is that if it were a patient expressing these same concerns over their health issues, you would encourage and support them. But not your nurse collegues. They're just "********."
    Statistics on the nursing profession show that approximately 20% of new grads quit the profession within the first 5 years; that there is a significant portion of nurses with active licenses who are not in clinical practice; and that the concern over the nursing shortage will persist despite all attempts to increase the number of nursing students. Why is that? Are all of those nurses just complainers? Or maybe there are legitimate issues that the profession needs to address. And, support their fellow nurses who fall victim to the system that creates the problems.
    I believe nurse would be better served if they recognized the power they have if they banded together for the benefit of the profession. Unfortunately, time and time again, they instead turn on each other, and like you, blame the victim. Something you would never do if it were your patient, but are more than willing to do for your fellow nurses.
  3. by   BillEDRN
    Quote from Warpster
    I don't think "pathetic" is quite the right word, as I'm sure the flamefest so far has demonstrated. "Overly dedicated" might be a bit better.

    Working conditions like the ones you described so neatly are the reason 50% of the trained RNs in this country are no longer practicing. Those working conditions are certainly why I've left.

    Throwing more money at us while reducing staffing, increasing responsibility, overworking, and looking the other way when we're abused or even assaulted is not going to work. Even if nursing were paid at pro sports or rock star levels, there's no way I'd go back.

    Only by organizing can we ever hope to get reasonable working conditions. The problem seems to be that too many nurses think "union" means sweaty guys in wifebeater shirts driving trucks. Maybe if we called it a "guild?"

    In any case, unionization = better working conditions. Pass it on.
    Amen! More unionized nurses mean better working conditions. Unfortunately many nurses feel nurses are "unprofessional." I don't know about you, but airline pilots, architects, police officers, and many other "professionals" are unionized. The sooner nurses realize the benefits of being in a union, the sooner the profession will be on the road to improving their working conditions.
  4. by   JenieLou
    The OP needs to "speak for herself" and not generalize about ALL of us. I have been a nurse going on 16 years and have always tried to NOT be like those people she is ranting about. Yes, I have been the unlucky recipient of the backstabbing, gossiping and generally mean things she is referring to, but I have always tried to be the one to be different and make positve changes, not become burned out and bitter and ruin the work environment for others! OP...you sound exactly like a co-worker I've been dealing with lately. She's been in the same job as long as I've been a nurse(too long) and is clearly burned out but instead of moving to something else, she prefers to sit around and make the rest of us miserable too. We are all walking on eggshells trying not to set her off and were constantly trying to protect her from getting herself in trouble with administration with her mouth... I've always said if you don't like one job as a nurse, then GO DO SOMETHING ELSE! No one is tying you to your chair! Some people just get stuck in a rut and can't move out of a place they are no longer comfortable. Nursing is a big field, there's many jobs and everybody's not suited to the same thing. Yes, nursing has problems, but so does every profession. I just get tired of people who rant and rave about how bad nurses are to each other and then sit around wondering why no one is there to work with us anymore!
  5. by   SoxfanRN
    Quote from Warpster
    Only by organizing can we ever hope to get reasonable working conditions. The problem seems to be that too many nurses think "union" means sweaty guys in wifebeater shirts driving trucks. Maybe if we called it a "guild?"

    In any case, unionization = better working conditions. Pass it on.
    Unions can be a good thing as far as raises, benefits, and staffing ratios. They can also be devastating to teamwork. You have work stoppages, complete separation between management and staff, and over-protection of the worst employees. Seniority rules in unions meaning you could be the worst employee, but if you have senority, you get everything you want over a newer yet better employee. Everyone gets the same raises whether you work above and beyond or you do the job minimum. There is no incentive to work hard or go above and beyond with the union because you will not get anything extra.

    A union may be the way to go for an institution that completely abuses its employees. Otherwise, it may not be such a good idea.

    We can have organization without unions. If the ANA dropped its dues and attracted 90+% of RNs to match every other professional organization, we could have a mode of being heard and supported nationally. With the size of the RN workforce, we would be a force to be reckoned with.
  6. by   creature
    It sounds like you need a change of pace. Why don't you look into a different aspect of nursing. I had a back injury 4 years ago an am no longer able to do direct patient care because at our hospital we have to be able to lift 50lbs, so I ended up with a desk job doing Utilization Review. I hated it at first I think because I was forced into it, but now that I have been doing it for awhile and have just taken on Infection Control as well, I really enjoy it. I work 5 eight hours shifts a week, no forced overtime. I don't work holidays or weekends and it's alot less stressful.
    Think about it.
  7. by   blady
    Dear Creature

    I did not write that thread. My response to her is at the bottom of the thread.

    However, I do agree with your comment. Certain factors contribute to situations. I think those need to be addressed. A lot of people get into the profession just to pay their bills so they overwork themselves. Before you know it they get burnt out. Nurses need to take time to be humans. It's not about the paycheck only. I feel sad for the nurses who compare their salaries to other professions based on overtime. One's life should be in balance. If you try to buy everything in sight, off course you're going to work yourself to a frazzle.

    I believe that people need to know when its time to move on. A nurse always brings something to the table, when you feel that you can't bring anymore.......that's when you move on. You can only change youself. At the end of the day guess who gets short-changed. I am a strong advocate for education because college gives you some tools for life, if you use them. If you're only going to take it for a job then you still haven't learned. Others can only do to you what you allow them to.

    Someone commented that nursing schools don't prepare us for the real world. Which profession does? Besides, all nursing programs are not created equal. I know that I had a class called 'nursing trend' which prepared me to nurture the caregiver.....me. Think about it, the nurse is exposed to death and dying....it's not normal to be surrounded by that all the time. If you ask me, a nurse should work 4 days for the most. If you live within your means you could.
    Last edit by blady on Mar 23, '07
  8. by   blady
    Quote from creature
    It sounds like you need a change of pace. Why don't you look into a different aspect of nursing. I had a back injury 4 years ago an am no longer able to do direct patient care because at our hospital we have to be able to lift 50lbs, so I ended up with a desk job doing Utilization Review. I hated it at first I think because I was forced into it, but now that I have been doing it for awhile and have just taken on Infection Control as well, I really enjoy it. I work 5 eight hours shifts a week, no forced overtime. I don't work holidays or weekends and it's alot less stressful.
    Think about it.
    I did not write that thread. My response is at the bottom of her thread
  9. by   stayingoutoftrouble
    I always wonder about the background of the people who post here, have they been in the nursing profession their whole career or have they worked in other fields?? If you asked anyone in any profession (unless they are a CEO) they would probably say they wanted more money, better working conitions, more respect, etc. And to say that nurses aren't really looked at as "professional" I can't really agree with. I look at myself as a professional and feel that most others (patients, family, doctors) do as well. OF COURSE, there are going to be some people that treat you like crap but that happens in any job. That is the nature of some people. If you believe you deserve more than there isn't anything wrong with asking for it (going thru the proper channels) but to say that nurses are pathetic or not professionals seems a bit much.
  10. by   EmerNurse
    I don't think nurses are pathetic, but perhaps it's the healthcare field at the moment, which is pathetic.

    The entire system, as it stands, is set up for just this type of frustration and burn out. Unfortunately, the outspoken nurses are labeled trouble-makers and are often harried out of a job with nit-picking write-ups and threats of 'if you don't like it,leave'. /Other nurses see this and are intimidated into staying silent... at the end of the day, we NEED our jobs, our benefits etc and it's not always easy to go find another job. The grass ISN'T always greener on another floor, unit, sphere of nursing.

    I've always loved the quote "be the change you want to see" and while I'm up here on Allnurses venting with the rest of us, at work, I TRY to do this. When I get a crappy doc babbling in my face, I just stay silent, and stare right at him with a bemused expression on my face. When he finally shuts up, I STAY silent until he notices and makes some comment like "you aren't even listening to me!", to which I reply in a very sweet and concerned voice, *"Oh no doctor, I heard everything you said but I didn't want to interrupt you while you were venting and upset. I'm not a moron, now about that PRN clonidine?" More silence. They really DO get the point LOL. It works on the phone after your silence brings a "hello.... hello?" You then start from the * above.

    One of my favorite all time authors was Miss Manners, who managed to have an answer for everything, always done with the height of manners in such a way that if you were quoted, you couldn't possibly come out sounding incorrect for saying it. To the above example, my answer would be? "Oh but he was so upset and yelling, I assumed he needed a moment to vent, maybe he was having a bad day, he seemed SO frazzled. I'm sure he would NEVER speak to me like that otherwise." said with a straight face. Just WHAT is the doc gonna say to that? "No no I'm always an A***ole and she should damn well know it!"? Yeah, I don't think so, heh.
    Same works when this doc does it to a coworker. IN earshot of the doctor, comfort your coworker, "Jane don't mind him, I'm sure he's just having a really bad day. Not ALL of the doctors are capable of handling stress in a calm and reasonable manner. Some of them just can't handle it and have to vent." And when you're called on the carpet by the doctor, well just go back to * above. Of course, you're welcome to tell Jane (in private) that yeah he IS that way..and then how you handle him.

    Variations on this work with coworkers too and just about anything else. If you allow them to think you are assuming the BEST about them and that they are just having a moment of weakness and stress, it perks them right up because they don't want you to consider them weak and stressed out (the idea of the tirade is thier ego which believes they are none of those things).

    There's always someone this won't work on, of course, but some variation of it works on most. And its great fun to hone this skill. Just make sure to use your best therapeutic communication tone of voice and use words which, when quoted, make You look sympathic and kindhearted. Then come to Allnurses and tell us what you really think.

    I swear everyone should read Judith Martin (miss manners). She is the absolute QUEEN of the polite, irreproachable comeback.

    Btw - the best case scenario is to REALLY believe the best of your docs and coworks. If it's a one-time thing, please DO really assume it's a one-off and they're not like that usually. The above "therapeutic communication" is reserved for those who need to be taught a lesson. The key is to respond the same way EVERY time. It'll drive 'em nuts and they'll give you want you need just to stay out of your way. <sweet smile>
    Last edit by EmerNurse on Mar 23, '07
  11. by   blady
    Quote from stayingoutoftrouble
    I always wonder about the background of the people who post here, have they been in the nursing profession their whole career or have they worked in other fields?? If you asked anyone in any profession (unless they are a CEO) they would probably say they wanted more money, better working conitions, more respect, etc. And to say that nurses aren't really looked at as "professional" I can't really agree with. I look at myself as a professional and feel that most others (patients, family, doctors) do as well. OF COURSE, there are going to be some people that treat you like crap but that happens in any job. That is the nature of some people. If you believe you deserve more than there isn't anything wrong with asking for it (going thru the proper channels) but to say that nurses are pathetic or not professionals seems a bit much.
    Repeat!!!! I did not write that thread. Go back to the original thread and see who wrote it and look at my RESPONSE at the bottom of the thread........thank you.
  12. by   BBFRN
    Quote from BillEDRN
    Well, get used to working short! It is nurses like you, who think that anyone who is used by the system to the point that they can't take it anymore (i.e burnout) should leave instead of voicing legitimate concerns and feelings about their work environment. The irony is that if it were a patient expressing these same concerns over their health issues, you would encourage and support them. But not your nurse collegues. They're just "********."
    Statistics on the nursing profession show that approximately 20% of new grads quit the profession within the first 5 years; that there is a significant portion of nurses with active licenses who are not in clinical practice; and that the concern over the nursing shortage will persist despite all attempts to increase the number of nursing students. Why is that? Are all of those nurses just complainers? Or maybe there are legitimate issues that the profession needs to address. And, support their fellow nurses who fall victim to the system that creates the problems.
    I believe nurse would be better served if they recognized the power they have if they banded together for the benefit of the profession. Unfortunately, time and time again, they instead turn on each other, and like you, blame the victim. Something you would never do if it were your patient, but are more than willing to do for your fellow nurses.
    I don't know about this. Time & time again, I have witnessed a group of nurses standing around griping about one thing or another, and 9 times out of 10 if you ask them if they have even mentioned the problems to TPTB, they will say they haven't. How many of these nurses write their politicians, state nurse's associations, newspapers, etc.? How many of them ask questions or raise concerns in staff meetings? How supportive are they being to their coworkers when they don't take action themselves, and smile & nod every time management approaches them?

    It's not so much "blaming the victim," as asking them to quit being victims. This is what helps with cohesiveness. Back up the nurses that actually speak up outside the circle. Usually, the biggest gripers on a unit will be the first ones to tuck tail and run when problems are brought up to management.

    As far as your statistics go, I'd be interested in knowing what percentage of these people left because of other nurses and compare them with those who left because of institutional policies.
  13. by   BBFRN
    Quote from blady
    Repeat!!!! I did not write that thread. Go back to the original thread and see who wrote it and look at my RESPONSE at the bottom of the thread........thank you.
    They are replying to the original thread. When you post in a thread, it subscribes you to it, and you will get emails every time someone else posts. They're not responding to you unless they quote you.

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