Nose plugs?

  1. I was wondering why it is not common practice to wear nose plugs when dealing with the really stomach turning smells? Syncronized swimmers have the ones that fit inside the nose and are clear, so that you can't realy see them.

    I would invest in a pair if we where aloud to wear them. I'm one of tose poeple who vomit at the smell of vomit, I can see it, hear it, but the smell just does me in.
    thanx SR
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  2. 18 Comments

  3. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Still Riding
    I was wondering why it is not common practice to wear nose plugs when dealing with the really stomach turning smells? Syncronized swimmers have the ones that fit inside the nose and are clear, so that you can't realy see them.

    I would invest in a pair if we where aloud to wear them. I'm one of tose poeple who vomit at the smell of vomit, I can see it, hear it, but the smell just does me in.
    thanx SR
    I've never seen a formal rule against them. I would not think that anyone would be able to say anything about it if you did. If someone thinks it might insult a patient - do you think the patient would rather see their nurse retch and heave?
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I realize you are asking a legitimate question here. Let me try and help you out in the kindest way possible. Like the poster before me said, imagine yourself on the other side of that bedrail----and all your nurses and medical staff come into your room wearing noseplugs while rounding and giving you care. How would you feel????

    Now, there are effective ways to deal with smells. There is a thread somewhere here at all nurses about it. Ask any experienced nurse here, he/she has had to cope with noxious odors in their work. Not one ever wore a nose plug I saw. We are nursing PEOPLE, not stenches.

    The way I used to cope was when I floated to ICU----I just put just a bit of VICKS under my nares, esp. for GI bleeds. GI bleeds, to me, are the worst smell there is....can smell them before entering the glass doors of the ICU. I, however, would never make it so clear to a patient his/her smell disgusted me. Alert and oriented people KNOW how bad it is, already, why make them feel any worse. And why disorient anyone further who may not be alert as usual by walking into his/her room w/a nose plug? And how would you think their family members would feel about this?

    Just a bad idea in my opinion.....very insensitive to patient and family members alike.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Jul 6, '04
  5. by   leslie :-D
    i have to agree it would be a grossly insensitive offense to the patient. what's the difference between wearing nose plugs and just breathing through your mouth?
  6. by   louloubell1
    Quote from earle58
    i have to agree it would be a grossly insensitive offense to the patient. what's the difference between wearing nose plugs and just breathing through your mouth?
    You know, I can not do that (breathing through my mouth thing). I mean I just have some psychological aversion to it. It is somehow grosser to me, almost like tasting it rather than just smelling it. Weird, huh?
  7. by   susanna
    Not a nurse yet but I thought that we were allowed to wear masks whenever we needed to. Is that not true?
  8. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Breathing through the mouth=open mouth=nasty stuff that flies=nasty stuff in the mouth.

    The Vicks works (especially in those ischemic bowel rooms).
  9. by   P_RN
    Or develop anosmia like me. The way I found out I had it was when someone asked me how I could stand the smell in a certain room. I miss candles and roses but it has its good side too.

    The mask looks like a very good suggestion. You could use the clear nose plugs under it .
  10. by   boggle
    I agree that I wouldn't want the patient to see the nose clips. Just how inconspicuous are they? Would you sound like your nose is all plugged up? What happens if you sneeze?

    Oh, but some smells...!!! A coworker recently gave me some of those breath mint strips (Listermint I think) to try when dealing with odor. They are strong! Put a couple of those puppies in your mouth all at once before tackling the task, and you wont smell anything for hours.
  11. by   Destinystar
    you can do whatever you see fit. as long as it doesnt compromise patient safety. if you ever suddenly vomit you could aspirate if the vomit could not exit your nose. quote=still riding]i was wondering why it is not common practice to wear nose plugs when dealing with the really stomach turning smells? syncronized swimmers have the ones that fit inside the nose and are clear, so that you can't realy see them.

    i would invest in a pair if we where aloud to wear them. i'm one of tose poeple who vomit at the smell of vomit, i can see it, hear it, but the smell just does me in.
    thanx sr[/quote]
  12. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    You can't plan for vomit-
    It happens when you don't expect it.

    You can't leave the pt and run to your locker, put nose plugs in and come back.
  13. by   Still Riding
    I agree that I wouldn't want the patient to see the nose clips. Just how inconspicuous are they? Would you sound like your nose is all plugged up? What happens if you sneeze?
    It was just a question I don't want to offend anyone. but actually a friend of mine has a set because of competitive swimming and I'm not talking about the kind that clip on your nose, they are really neat they are made costom and are clear and fit inside your nose so no one can see them.

    I agree that wearing an obviouse nose plug is inconsiderate to the patients and their family. I was just wondering if their was a medical kind of nose plug.
  14. by   RN92
    Speaking of bad smells...wounds with maggots have to be on the top 10 list!!

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