No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 23

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing about this?" Here is my reason... Read More


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    A close friend of mine said she thinks many new grads don't stay at their original place of employment because often they are hired and treated like crap because they don't know much and it is hard to shake the "newbie" label. They then go to another job with some experience and are not treated as poorly. Sounds reasonable to me.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
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    So, in an ironic sort of way, there's an advantage to being a nurse in an undesirable part of the "rust belt".
    anotherone and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
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    Quote from tothepointeLVN
    The wrong mix of experience bullet is the worst which is why new grad RN's have to fight so hard to get those new grad hospital position or be pigeonholed as a "B" nurse forever regardless of experience or skill.

    Well thats my fear at least.
    I'm one of those nurses who has the wrong mix of experience.

    I have a total of 6.5 years of experience (4 years as an LVN and became an RN 2 years ago). My experience includes LTC, acute rehab, subacute rehab, and a little psych. I have never worked in an acute care hospital.

    I have been living in Texas for the past 7 years, but have been attempting to return to my home state of California for the past year. However, I will not return without a job offer. I've been submitting applications in the most undesirable cities (Visalia, Bakersfield, Delano, Fresno, etc.), and have even gotten some callbacks, a couple of phone interviews, and one live interview.

    All of my interviewers wanted candidates with at least one year of acute care hospital experience, even for non-hospital positions. My mix of non-acute experience is shooting me in the foot, but I'll continue to press on.
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    of course if you do have acute care experience, but as an lpn it also doesn't count for anything. i know the scope of practice is different for lpn's and rn's but why not accept the fact that i do have some acute care experience and teach me what i need to grow into the rn role.
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    Quote from OCNRN63
    ?????

    !!!!!

    .....
    All posts mentioning popcorn relate to post #95 by malamud69, and the anticipated but never materialized entertaining reactions people expected. Most of them are contained between his post and around #125 or so. I'd requote it but I fear our collective good judgement may not hold up through a second take.
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    Quote from HM-8404
    A close friend of mine said she thinks many new grads don't stay at their original place of employment because often they are hired and treated like crap because they don't know much and it is hard to shake the "newbie" label. They then go to another job with some experience and are not treated as poorly. Sounds reasonable to me.
    I had an instructor that essentially advised me to leave my first position after one year for that reason. That even if you stayed there for years they would always remember the newbie moments. Of course that implies that the senior staff stick around which might be a good reason to stay.
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    All of my interviewers wanted candidates with at least one year of acute care hospital experience, even for non-hospital positions. My mix of non-acute experience is shooting me in the foot, but I'll continue to press on.
    Even a couple of the bridge programs here want the LVN's to have 1 year acute experience. Luckily the one I was aiming for changed their position on the matter when it was repeatedly asked "where the badword were they going to get that from"
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    Quote from morte
    This just reinforces the fact that "we" the nursing community is not acting as a "gate keeper" in keeping the graduating number DOWN. If these grads aren't good enough to hire, they shouldn't have been admitted. Supply.and.Demand.
    Things would be different if the profession of nursing functioned as a team, but in fact it often acts like it is a loose federation of warring tribes.
    anotherone, morte, and Burlshoe114 like this.
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    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Cannnot speak to everywhere but here in NYC most colleges and universities including CUNY and SUNY programs have prereqs and most instructors are pretty strict about enforcing the fact one is supposed to have the proper background to keep up. If one has barely squeaked by in an 100 level math class there are really only two options; find an *easy* 200 level math class professor or arrange for tutoring/some sort of help.

    Problems come from two fronts but the main thing is that often professors and other students complain about class time being *wasted* explaining and or slowing down for those who cannot keep up to the required level.

    Case in point for my finite math class the professor marched in on day one and clearly told us that if anyone had not either passed the proper placement exams and or taken remedial algerbra classes to leave *NOW*. He was *NOT* going to teach high school/college level intro algerbra so if you fell behind it was your own affair. Since the class was required for graduation and many (like me) left it for our last semester there were few options for those who couldn't keep up.

    Being as that may we still had few girls that piped up with questions such as why (-)+(-) =;s + and or couldn't figure out order of operations. By mid-term exams they were either gone or accepted long as they got a "D" thus passing the class they were good. In the end IIRC some failed.
    Yes, my statistics instructor announced on the first day of class that intermediate algebra with a minimum grade of 'C' was a prerequisite for the class. Like your finite math class, there was no time spent on any algebra topics. On the few occasions that people did raise questions related to algebra, the instructor's tone when she answered made it very clear that if you needed to ask those questions you needed to find another math class.
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    Honestly I think sometimes Math professors don't want people who are bad at math to be good at math. They just want to teach the mathematically able and get their kicks from having students with aptitude.

    At my college you couldn't enroll into a class unless you had the prereqs the system wouldn't let you.
    silenced, Fiona59, and HM-8404 like this.


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