No Nursing Shortage At The Present Time - page 23

I am assured that some of you are reading this and saying to yourselves, "Duh! This topic is old hat. We already know there's a glut of nurses in many parts of the country, so why are you writing... Read More

  1. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    2
    I'm taking a phlebotomy class at the local community college. Of the 12 people in my class, 9 are trying to go to nursing school. If any of them ask me about the job market, I'm not going to lie.
    silenced and MochaRN424 like this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    1
    I'm listening to a lecture right now, and my nursing school teacher is talking about a nursing shortage, though she mentions that new grads are having a hard time finding jobs in the city, moving to other cities, they find sign on bonuses. I'm not sure how truthful she is being.
    Esme12 likes this.
  4. Visit  netglow profile page
    3
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    I'm listening to a lecture right now, and my nursing school teacher is talking about a nursing shortage, though she mentions that new grads are having a hard time finding jobs in the city, moving to other cities, they find sign on bonuses. I'm not sure how truthful she is being.
    Ha ha. You could do one of those loud cheaply disguised coughs "bull-crap", and when she says, excuse me Princess???? You could say, sorry, I just choked on something big...
    silenced, Esme12, and Fiona59 like this.
  5. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    1
    Quote from netglow
    Ha ha. You could do one of those loud cheaply disguised coughs "bull-crap", and when she says, excuse me Princess???? You could say, sorry, I just choked on something big...
    I wish I could! It is a recording.

    I nearly died when she mentioned sign-on bonuses. In this day and age, one is lucky to get a job. Sign on bonuses just don't happen for new grads.
    Esme12 likes this.
  6. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    6
    Quote from ThePrincessBride
    I'm listening to a lecture right now, and my nursing school teacher is talking about a nursing shortage, though she mentions that new grads are having a hard time finding jobs in the city, moving to other cities, they find sign on bonuses. I'm not sure how truthful she is being.
    Keep in mind that your nursing school instructor's job is highly dependent upon continuing to perpetuate the myth of the nursing shortage. If masses of career-changing people suddenly discover that RN/LPN jobs are not as plentiful as they were 7 to 10 years ago, these folks will stop enrolling in nursing programs, which may result in less nursing faculty positions.
  7. Visit  workingharder profile page
    0
    Just read that HHS has awarded $23 million to increase the size of nursing school staffs.
    Federal grants bolster nursing faculty, diversity | National Nursing News
    Keep that flood of new nurses coming.
    Last edit by workingharder on Sep 11, '12
  8. Visit  turnforthenurseRN profile page
    0
    When I started my nursing program in 2007 and upon graduating in 2010, instructors constantly talked about the "nursing shortage."

    The shortage comes from the lack of available jobs and hospitals having to "reduce cost" - thus increasing nurse to patient ratios, leading to unsafe staffing, etc.
  9. Visit  samadams8 profile page
    6
    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    When I started my nursing program in 2007 and upon graduating in 2010, instructors constantly talked about the "nursing shortage."

    The shortage comes from the lack of available jobs and hospitals having to "reduce cost" - thus increasing nurse to patient ratios, leading to unsafe staffing, etc.


    Absolutely. I will not say there is this nursing shortage, like their used to be, say 20 years ago--although, in certain areas, it is much "drier" than in other areas around the country.

    What I will say is THERE ARE POSITIONS THAT ADMINISTRATIONS HAVE FROZEN DUE TO THE RECESSION--as well as a few other things--like their contribution and reduced limitations related to health insurance coverage as they act as self-insured entities.

    About 5 years ago, things really started to tighten up. Hospitals are only allowing so many positions to open up. When they want to look like they are trying to fill more, they advertise and mandate BSN or whatever limitors they want to put on in order to make it look like they are trying hard to meet staffing. This looks good, especially for Magnet facilities--BUT, it also looks good, from a Magnet perspective, that they must "limit" due to lack of BSN. It's a bit of a game right now, both political but also, very financial.

    This is why some places constantly rotate new hires in and out and in and out continuously to basically the same positions that have always needed filling. Don't let the claim of the "costs of orienting" fool you. The costs of orienting have been cut down significantly over the years--b/c so much is loaded on a computer, which a nurse can access via Intranet through their own Internet, and also b/c they don't orient people the way in which they should be oriented. They also don't pay for various certifications pretty much anymore.

    I like this one the best. They use orientees like nurse-fillers for the 90 days, and maybe one or so they will hold on to, if they feel they really like them and they "fit" with the culture. The rest of those on the probationary period--good ones even--they toss to the wind. "Ah, it didn't work out. You weren't a good fit." or "As a GN, you are not ready--when they mistakes are normal for new nurses and not grievous." Listen, even before they toss those other poor nurse souls out the door, they are already interviewing their replacements. It's incredible.

    Someone posted about hospitals testing for nicotine. That's totally about limiting health coverage from self-insured hospital entities. It's a lot about being a money thing. Don't think it isn't. You have to always follow the money.
  10. Visit  netglow profile page
    3
    "I like this one the best. They use orientees like nurse-fillers for the 90 days, and maybe one or so they will hold on to, if they feel they really like them and they "fit" with the culture. The rest of those on the probationary period--good ones even--they toss to the wind. "Ah, it didn't work out. You weren't a good fit." or "As a GN, you are not ready--when they mistakes are normal for new nurses and not grievous." Listen, even before they toss those other poor nurse souls out the door, they are already interviewing their replacements. It's incredible."

    This is so true. There are 100s of stories on this forum of being hauled into a NM's office to find you are a danger to the world, when you've heard only wonderful comments from those orienting you - and who have written you up a dozen times dating back to your first days on the unit.

    Yup. I've read a gazillion of those posts.
    silenced, nursel56, and koi310 like this.
  11. Visit  tryingtotransition profile page
    0
    Hi, I am a new member although I have read posts,articles, etc for some time now. I became a licensed RN in
    June 2010 and started working that August in M/S Tele transferring to Surgery the following August. This is my
    second career. I have worked in Transfusion Medicine for 30 years. My gig in Surgery did not work out. I was asked
    to resign in January 2012-I was one of 11 in the hospital's "Periop" program. I was 52 years old and could not keep
    up with the other women who are in the twenties. I have been unable to obtain another nursing position at this time.
    I like my first career as well (and it pays me better). I do miss taking care of my patients.So now I take care of their
    nurses.
  12. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    0
    What do you do in your previous/now line of work tryingtotransition?
  13. Visit  steven007 profile page
    2
    Awesome article!
    And very true!
    Sometimes I feel depressed by the sheer number of people I meet who are nurses. It kind of takes the excitement and novelty out of the saying "I'm a nurse".

    Still, it is a decent profession and continues to make advances in medical science =).
    silenced and TheCommuter like this.
  14. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    0
    Quote from steven007
    Sometimes I feel depressed by the sheer number of people I meet who are nurses. It kind of takes the excitement and novelty out of the saying "I'm a nurse".
    I agree. As more individuals continue to jump into the nursing bandwagon without the corresponding demand in local employment markets, the value of possessing a nursing degree begins to erode.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Top