NG Tube Yields 2000 ml Immediately - page 3

by Nurse_Advocate 3,714 Views | 23 Comments

I walked into one of my patient's rooms yesterday and I see this 70 something year old woman who has been on the floor for 2 DAYS who is extremely nauseated. She has a history of cancer and she's admitted for small bowel... Read More


  1. 0
    Isn't it amazing how much better a person can BREATHE when the stomach isn't distended into the chest cavity anymore? I've seen high peak pressures in ventilated patients drop almost as soon as an NG is inserted and put to suction. I swear with one guy I saw an entire pepperoni pizza aspirated in a couple of minutes!

    BTW, I once knew a nurse who told me he had put an NG in himself once - try it and see how far you get!
    Last edit by aeauooo on Apr 21, '08
  2. 0
    Quote from nyapa
    Wow, I've never heard of 2000mL straight away from an NG. The poor pt! Are you guys allowed to insert one without a doctors order? Or can you place one based on your judgment. Unfortunately we have to have an order. We try three times, and if unsuccessful, call the resident medical officer. Generally speaking, nurses are better at it. Doctors seem to love putting down hosepipes...
    Yes. We absolutely need an order to place an NG tube...and in this case there was an order on the chart for 2 days but it HAD A LOOPHOLE...it said, "Place NG tube if patient continues to have nausea and vomiting"...unfortunately the nurses kept medicating her with just enough anti-nausea meds to keep very large emesis at bay so she was just having small throw ups here and there (and those don't count I guess?).

    When things like this happen, I remind myself that I have choices in my life. I can make whatever I want happen in my life if I'm willing to do the daily baby steps required...it's my sincerest wish to inspire other nurses to create their ideal lives too!:typing
  3. 0
    Quote from Nurse_Advocate
    Yes. We absolutely need an order to place an NG tube...and in this case there was an order on the chart for 2 days but it HAD A LOOPHOLE...it said, "Place NG tube if patient continues to have nausea and vomiting"...unfortunately the nurses kept medicating her with just enough anti-nausea meds to keep very large emesis at bay so she was just having small throw ups here and there (and those don't count I guess?).
    no matter how the order read, ng tubes are excellent for decompression.
    this pt's abd was grossly distended.
    even in the absence of n/v, it should have been placed.
    shabby nsg for those who avoided it.

    leslie
  4. 0
    Quote from ERTraumaJunkie
    The RN that I work with in the ER actually runs and hides if she sees an order for NGT to be dropped. She will stay hidden until I have it done. What's the big deal? We do a lot worse things without as much benefit in return....
    I work with a nurse who does that too.

    I'm the opposite. I'll seek out those skills I think I need to master. I'll grab whoever is the 'master' at that skill on shift and have her/him in the room with me. It benefits the patients and it benefits my comfort with certain skills that we don't get to perform everyday, which in turn, again benefits patients.

    There's nothing wrong about asking for help or guidance.


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