New grad just got fired

  1. I am still searching for the strength to move on. I was called in the office yesterday and given the pink slip. I am a new grad, just graduated in May and passed nclex a couple months later and got my first job on a med surg floor.. I started work the end of July and I was on orientation and had three preceptors. The educator dilligently came around and ask me questions about my pts. Basically this lady just hammered on things I told her I needed to look up. She nailed me on things I failed to answered correctly plus exaggerated . And guess what she had it all documented, correct me if i am wrong, am i suppose to answer all her questions correctly? DO all nurses truly and honestly know qthing about their pts? it was the completion of my orientation and they pulled me and said byebye!! Besides, My preceptor just told me how great I was doing the other day.
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  2. 98 Comments

  3. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from rn2day
    I am still searching for the strength to move on. I was called in the office yesterday and given the pink slip. I am a new grad, just graduated in May and passed nclex a couple months later and got my first job on a med surg floor.. I started work the end of July and I was on orientation and had three preceptors. The educator dilligently came around and ask me questions about my pts. Basically this lady just hammered on things I told her I needed to look up. She nailed me on things I failed to answered correctly plus exaggerated . And guess what she had it all documented, correct me if i am wrong, am i suppose to answer all her questions correctly? DO all nurses truly and honestly know qthing about their pts? it was the completion of my orientation and they pulled me and said byebye!! Besides, My preceptor just told me how great I was doing the other day.
    I was told the same thing by my supervisor two days before I was fired from my last job in August.

    Did they say why you were being fired? What was their reason?

    On the other hand, employers don't have to have a reason to get rid of you these days, especially if you live in an "at will" work state....like I do. They'd rather set you up for failure, instead.

    I know what you are going through...and I hate it for you.
  4. by   llg
    It's really hard to pick yourself up and move on after such and event ... but you can do it. Other people (includng me) have faced similar situations and survived. The trick is to evaluate the situation thoroughly and honestly so that you can avoid similar situations in the future.

    Take a few days to pamper yourself and gather your strength, then do some serious thinking about what went wrong. Perhaps it had nothing to do with your actual performance, but more with how you presented yourself to your preceptors etc. Perhaps it was a unit that isn't used to hiring/orienting new grads and who therefore had unrealistic expectations. Perhaps the unit was too busy and/or complex for your beginner-level organizational skills. etc. etc. etc.

    Once you figure out what went wrong, you can begin making a plan that will help you be successful at your next job.

    Good luck to you.
    Take care,
    llg
  5. by   Tweety
    I moved your post to the General Nurses form instead of introductions because I feel you'll get more support here.

    I'm sorry you are going through this. It must be very hard, especially a new grad. We have too much to do and remember to know it all, and there is nothing wrong with having to stop and say "let me look at my notes, the chart, or the computer for that information". Sheesh.

    Good luck in whatever you. Better things are in store. I just know it.
  6. by   P_RN
    I've been there. It feels like someone punched you in the stomach. Please don't give up. Sometimes you will find that better "fitting job." I know I did.
  7. by   chelli73
    I hope that you find a better job as soon as you are ready. I feel for you, and I think that what happened to you is one of every new grads worst fears. I have it, for sure. But life brings experience, and experience brings wisdom. You will become stronger from this. Take care and feel better, M.

    PS-WHY do bosses always give us a thumbs up RIGHT before they give the axe!!!!!???? I have been through that before....haven't most of us?
  8. by   leslie :-D
    i am so, so sorry to hear this.
    it really does feel like you've been kicked in the stomach and you're gasping for air.
    be rest assured, you will find a job that fits just right.
    be gentle with yourself.
    take whatever time necessary to heal.
    do an honest self-evaluation.
    of course no one knows all the answers.
    however, there is a minimum, basic standard that is expected.
    visit with a nurse recruiter.
    they will be able to answer any questions you have as a new grad.
    they will know if these questions were realistic.

    wishing you a positive outcome in actualizing everything you were meant to be.

    leslise
  9. by   luvkitties
    I'm so sorry you are going through this right now...wishing you comfort and the strength to rise above this...there is a better nursing job out there for you...chin up!

    :icon_hug: :icon_hug: :icon_hug:

    As for the NM and whomever else :lol_hitti :trout: :lol_hitti :trout:

    ~Lori
  10. by   shazbo
    i'm sorry you got fired from your first job; it most certainly won't be your last job though. i was lucky enough to have maybe 15 years under my belt before it happened to me.i learned something from it.firstly, humility.i'm not everybodys cup of tea?how about that? i'm a good nurse though and if you don't give up but rather keep going you will discover just how good a nurse you can be. and no,no one knows everything about their pts. but a good nurse anticipates probable outcomes and to do that you must know as much as you can-read the chart-put things together to have the clearest picture of your pt.imo you can't know too much. keep your chin up and best wishes
  11. by   Elisheva
    As a new grad, I would be confused about what I did wrong. I would ask for a meeting with preceptor/nurse manager (exit interview) and request a written explanation detailing areas that were lacking. I would explain that I needed this information in order to better prepare myself for my next work experience.

    I'd be persistent.
  12. by   Pepper The Cat
    I too, was fired early in my career. Pick yourself up, dust yourself off and try again. Sometimes the fit just isn't right. Looking back now, 20 -odd years later, I can see mistakes I made, both in judgement and nsg skills and failing to ask for help. However, I still think that instead off just firing me (sorry the term was "failed to continue after probation, or some other term) if they had given me a bit a guideance and help things could have gotten better. I was told later that this head nurse had a history of doing this to new grads, which brings up the question, why place a new grad there?
    Anyway, I am getting off topic. I know you are feeling down, but the quicker you can get back on track, the better. Can you arrange a meeting with the educator and/or preptor and get some feedback about where you went wrong and what you can do to improve? And remember - that which does not kill us, makes us stronger (some extentionalist whose name I can't remember!)
  13. by   TazziRN
    Wow.......even JCAHO says "I don't know" is not a wrong answer as long as you follow it with "I can look it up."
  14. by   anne74
    I had a similiar experience, although it never came to my firing. In fact, I beat them to the punch and now I'm transferring to a new unit. I was grilled so much that I never had peace and quiet to think on my own. Being under that much constant scrutiny actually made me regress. I was constantly called into the "principal's office" for closed door meetings, and had other nurses watching me and then "tattling", etc. They made me so nervous I made more mistakes.

    I'll be transferring in a few weeks, and in the meantime, they've taken the pressure off and I've been thriving. I guess the moral of the story is, just because they're experienced nurses, doesn't mean they're experts on how to orient and teach a new grad. Perhaps they are the ones lacking in experience/abilities to understand what a new grad needs and didn't have realistic expectations. It also sounds like they threw in the towel too soon and gave up on you too early. If they were smart, they would have sat you down and figured out exactly where the problems were, and what you needed. Nurses don't grow on trees, so it would be more beneficial (and cost effective ) to keep working with you.

    Cut your losses, and find a new unit/hospital that has a specific new grad program, where they invest research and time to nuture new grads and help them launch their careers. Also, at your new unit, find a mentor who can not only help you through the growing pains, but also come to bat for you and be your advocate if you get railroaded again.

    I know of many experienced nurses who were fired from their first job, and you'd never know because now they're great nurses since they found their true "home". You just started off on the wrong foot and didn't receive what you needed to be successful. Every place is different, and you'll find a unit that's a great fit for you. Good luck!

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