monophasic/biphasic defibrillator

  1. 0
    HELLO. What is the difference between monophasic and biphasic defibrillators?? And how many joules do you charge each one. How do you determine the amount of joules to administer? thank you.
  2. 15 Comments so far...

  3. 2
    monophasic is basically DC current. It passes in one direction from one paddle to the next. Biphasic is like an AC jolt, part of the shock goes from one paddle to the next and then reverses from the opposite paddle back. Less energy is required for the same effect.

    I believe the joules for monophasic 360, and a biphasic is 200. Therefore there is less myocardial damage using a biphasic defibrilator and many studies that show better results in converting VT and VF. During a code, I believe current ACLS guidlines state that if you are using a monophasic you just keep it on 360 joules for every shock, and if you don't have instructions to the contrary, keep the biphasic defibrilator set on 200 joules.
    Last edit by Flightline on Nov 12, '08
    netglow and EJSRN like this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Flightline
    monophasic is basically DC current. It passes in one direction from one paddle to the next. Monophasic is like an AC jolt, part of the shock goes from one paddle to the next and then reverses from the opposite paddle back. Less energy is required for the same effect.

    I believe the joules for monophasic 360, and a biphasic is 200. Therefore there is less myocardial damage using a biphasic defibrilator and many studies that show better results in converting VT and VF. During a code, I believe current ACLS guidlines state that if you are using a biphasic you just keep it on 360 joules for every shock, and if you don't have instructions to the contrary, keep the biphasic defibrilator set on 200 joules.
    Just to clarify, I think the Flightline meant biphasic is like an AC jolt and passes one way then reverses back to the opposite paddle. The jolt goes two ways (bi) while a monophasic goes one way. In the second paragraph I think she meant you keep monophasic on 360 joules for every shock.

    Not trying to be a jerk and point out mistakes, just trying to clarify
    EJSRN likes this.
  5. 0
    Just to clarify, I think the Flightline meant biphasic is like an AC jolt and passes one way then reverses back to the opposite paddle. The jolt goes two ways (bi) while a monophasic goes one way. In the second paragraph I think she meant you keep monophasic on 360 joules for every shock.

    Not trying to be a jerk and point out mistakes, just trying to clarify
    Not at all. Thank you that's exactly what I meant to say. I must have been self-medicating with Jameson that night. I edited my post to correct it. Again thanks.
  6. 0
    the 'eating the young ' answer is ' if you don't know that should you be anywhere near a manual defib ?'

    the geek ( and correct technically answer) is RTFM (read the flipping manual )


    monophasic shocks are prley DC i.e. the potnetial goes one side of the arbitrary zero point where biphasic delivers part ofthe shock one side of the arbitrary zero point and the rest the other


    current guidelines say monophasic 360 j and biphasic at the makers recommended setting - which is usually 150 or 200 j depending on the exact waveform used
  7. 0
    Quote from ZippyGBR
    the 'eating the young ' answer is ' if you don't know that should you be anywhere near a manual defib ?'

    the geek ( and correct technically answer) is RTFM (read the flipping manual )


    monophasic shocks are prley DC i.e. the potnetial goes one side of the arbitrary zero point where biphasic delivers part ofthe shock one side of the arbitrary zero point and the rest the other


    current guidelines say monophasic 360 j and biphasic at the makers recommended setting - which is usually 150 or 200 j depending on the exact waveform used
    I'm just trying to learn here. I am new and havn't used one. I guess I shouldn't ask questions....
  8. 4
    Quote from EJSRN
    I'm just trying to learn here. I am new and havn't used one. I guess I shouldn't ask questions....
    You ask anything you wish, EJSRN. That's why we are here at allnurses.com, to assist and educate in a supportive manner.
    MassED, blondy2061h, EJSRN, and 1 other like this.
  9. 4
    Quote from EJSRN
    I'm just trying to learn here. I am new and havn't used one. I guess I shouldn't ask questions....
    Questions are what keeps everyone up to date, things are always changing in this profession so please ask away, only way to learn
    MassED, blondy2061h, EJSRN, and 1 other like this.
  10. 2
    Try this

    With the increasing availability of biphasic defibrillators for use in both the manual and shock-advisory modes, considerable confusion has developed as to the appropriate energy levels to be used with these devices. This confusion has arisen partly because of differing recommendations from manufacturers, partly as a result of limited clinical evidence and partly because of the clinical availability of both monophasic and biphasic defibrillators. The differences between these waveforms are the way energy is delivered. Biphasic energy is delivered in two directions, whereas monophasic energies are delivered in one direction. Recommendations of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation state that biphasic energies less than or equal to 200 J are as efficacious as escalating higher-energy monophasic shocks.1 Lower-energy biphasic shocks cause less myocardial injury and postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction, and so potentially improve the likelihood of survival.

    http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/...1003_fm-1.html


    Bestbets


    Here is a diagram of the different waveforms





    And if that's not enough this is a very good read if your interested in defibrillation waveforms and want to learn more about the biphasic truncated eponential waveform or the rectilinear biphasic waveform (I'm a bit geeky when it comes to defibrillators )

    http://www.ebme.co.uk/arts/biphasic/defib2.htm



    You'll find all the information you need about the different defibrillators.


    The evidence all suggests that biphasic is better energy to use for the termination of shockable rhythms and we will be seeing less monophasic machines in clinical areas.

    Hope this is helpful
    EJSRN and Silverdragon102 like this.
  11. 0
    even i have some uqeries regarding this! how do u identify by just looking at a defibrillator tht it is mono or biphasic? also our anaesthesiologist told us tht only the first shock is of 200 J in biphasic the successive shocks shud be of 360J.but another one told tht there is no energy selection option available to tht amount in biphasic .as a result iam confused!!


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