Low rider pants on nurses - page 12

It's becoming a problem in many workplaces according to yesterday's Wall Street Journal: Low rider pants. I'm seeing some nurses wearing them, and they're steadily moving south of propriety in... Read More

  1. by   glassam
    We have a dress policy that outlines what is acceptable, and more importantly, what isn't. Maybe yours needs to be updated. Um, and then enforced...
    I will share with you that a couple of months ago I witnessed two environmental service staff take a new food service aide aside to let him know that his low-rider, underwear & butt-crack showing pants were not acceptable "here at our hospital". I felt really proud of them! :kiss
  2. by   Frogman
    I agree that by wearing low rider pants we are taking a step back. Do we see other professionals wearing them. Do Doctors wear them. How do you all feel about shorts for nurses who are outside(ie: home health, hospice, public health)? I am from Texas and I don't think it is professional either.
  3. by   ainz
    How long will this thread go on. Look at the other threads and the number of responses--this thread demonstrates some of the issues facing nursing.

    If you talk about the real issues that face us you get some responses, but, talk about clothes and fashion in the workplace and people come out of the woodwork. I wish this much attention and energy went into solving problems that will ensure nursing's survival and advancement in the healthcare system.

    Amazing!!
  4. by   teamrn
    I've got to weigh in here. We have a huge healthcare crisis in this country and around the globe, and nurses chose to talk about the advantages, disadvantages, pros and cons of low-rider pants? No wonder nurses aren't respected too highly:imbar

    Please, guys and gals. Show the public what you're REALLY made of
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Here we go again.
  6. by   Denisem
    We had a young female nurse who liked to wear the low rise hip hugger pants. She had a good figure but everytime she would bend or squat you could see most of her thong. Our supervisor thought she had it under control because our personnel policy states that no underwear can be shown. This was pointed out to the young lady, but her solution to the problem was to eliminate the thong so you now got a view of most of her bare backside. She was written up but refused to change because she felt she was not in violation of the policy. The hopital attorney agreed with her and suggested that the personnel policy be changed and then all existing staff be given a 30 day notice to be in compliance. As it turned out she got another job and left. She never felt she was doing anything wrong and clinically she was a good nurse.




    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Here we go again.
  7. by   Jetman
    Quote from TinyNurse
    Never ever in nursing school, this would happen at the school I just graduated from. ( ex. one girl bought a drawstring waist type and the uniform store notified the instructor and she got called into the office to buy the required pair)

    I do have a pair of flare legs that are above the waist type. The photo looked fine to me, as long as when you provide care
    nothing is showing to the client.

    I am more concerned about the "cutsie" scrub shirts with sponge bob, etc when you are not working in peds. INHO if you are not working in peds or alzheimers, cutsie stuff is not appropriate.

    I prefer whites with a solid scrub shirt and white professional cover up.
    Jen
    White is a fine color if you work in a clean environment with no chance of getting dirty, but in the ER I wear dark solid colors usually navy blue since the chance of getting stained is high.

    Jetman
  8. by   PamUK
    Thankfully, we all have uniforms that are supplied by the hospital, so no fashion statements in nursing in the UK (can't comment about private hospitals). The uniforms are designed for the job in hand. We all look professional and that is the way it should be if we want to be taken seriously. How would anyone react if their lawyer turned up in court, or their doctor gave them a physical, wearing low-riders, a thong and a skimpy top showing their belly? I would be very UNIMPRESSED.

    And if a nurse wore a baseball cap at my hospital, (as one person mentioned earlier - facing backwards or forwards) I shudder! The DON would remove it, quickly followed by their head!!! A baseball cap on a nurse??? My jaw drops!
  9. by   kukitty
    Haven't read all the posts yet, but in response to this being a "generation gap" problem: I'm 26, follow fashion trends very closely (Yes, I own low-riders), and I'm for going back to whites, or at least uniforms. They look more professional, and makes it possible to tell the nurses from the aides and, in some places the housekeeping staff. I work with elderly, and they often will say "that nurse" when talking about one of the aides. I would also be for "color" seperation (i.e., aides in pink, nurses in blue) I even worked in a nursing home where the housekeeping staff wore one color, the aides another, and the nurses wore their choice of professional scrubs/uniform pants (like the prints).
  10. by   kesneysmom
    Quote from kukitty
    Haven't read all the posts yet, but in response to this being a "generation gap" problem: I'm 26, follow fashion trends very closely (Yes, I own low-riders), and I'm for going back to whites, or at least uniforms. They look more professional, and makes it possible to tell the nurses from the aides and, in some places the housekeeping staff. I work with elderly, and they often will say "that nurse" when talking about one of the aides. I would also be for "color" seperation (i.e., aides in pink, nurses in blue) I even worked in a nursing home where the housekeeping staff wore one color, the aides another, and the nurses wore their choice of professional scrubs/uniform pants (like the prints).

    I agree !! I am also 26. I have low-rise scrubs but would rather go to whites,hats ect. However I am a nurse at a highschool the kids would think it was Halloween if I came in with my whites on.
  11. by   GPatty
    I think they are extremely unprofessional and I daresay rather tacky in a healthcare setting.
  12. by   kukitty
    I've read more of the posts, and I'd like to clarify. Someone said that they thought that low-rise (no skin showing) were better than some wrinkly pair of scrub pants (high-rise) pulled of the floor (or the laundry basket) I think this is more to the point of my opinion. A lot of people in my generation (and some in the older ones as well) don't really have a concept of, like, ironing. I think clean, unwrinkled low-rise pants are better than wrinkly scrubs any day! I guess when I say I'd like to see a return to whites, it's because the first memory I have of my mom is seeing her in her white dress, stockings and those white shoes with the blue heart. She had long hair then, which she put up in a bun. She wore her nursing pins on the uniform. I was so proud of my mom; she looked so important! That's when I first remember wanting to be a nurse. I was totally disillusioned when I started my preceptorship in a nursing home (for my administrator's license) and saw wrinkled scrubs and t-shirts! EGADS! Where is the pride in that? How do you expect people to treat you with respect, when you don't have enough respect for yourself to at least look professional! Also, nurses work in many different situations, whites probably aren't practical for ER work, and Spongebob is NOT appropriate for gerontology, no matter how much you love him; however, it might make a child feel more secure. So, I think as long as they are appropriate prints for the situation, and clean/pressed, I'm okay with them.
  13. by   kukitty
    Quote from kesneysmom
    I agree !! I am also 26. I have low-rise scrubs but would rather go to whites,hats ect. However I am a nurse at a highschool the kids would think it was Halloween if I came in with my whites on.
    LOL!!!

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