Is this new grad a nut or what? Opinions please ! - page 8

We have a new grad on our floor. We kept hearing that she was going to be so good. She graduated with a 4.0 and her parents are both physicians. Well, she is far from good. She turns off her... Read More

  1. by   Thunderwolf
    Well, if she has reached her 90 days with you....you are most probably stuck with a big problem. Orientation is both a training/adjustment period...but, it is also a weeding out process too. I think someone really dropped the ball here. My heart goes out to you.
  2. by   Mirai Kangofu
    She sounds like a closet histrionic (craves attention but doesn't want to look like an attention hog) which she expresses by being "exotic" in some way by feigning an accent. There's a line between tripping up your lingo and copying. I knew an annoying nursing student like that, but she was histrionic and proud of it. She would raise her natural voice about 2 octaves and lisp like a 4 year old (sometimes people would catch her off guard and hear her real voice) because she thought it was cute. It was annoying b/c she bragged about herself to anyone who was around. She also had a 4.0 GPA (we always tied for top grades in microbiology, so I'm not saying this out of jealousy), but I'm not sure how she'll do without a constant fan club around her. The grad also sounds like a sheltered kid who kinda expects time to freeze around her so she can concentrate.
  3. by   Daytonite
    Wow! This saga gets more interesting every time the OP posts! Having worked with many new grads in an orientation program I kind of recognize that this young lady might be headed for trouble. She's either not going to make it, or she is going to work very, very, hard to make it as long as the hospital will give her continued chances. Telling co-workers to just answer her questions and not to do anything for her is an indicator of why she was an "A" student. It sounds like the nurse manager is being extremely generous in giving her time to improve. It is quite possible that this young lady and the nurse manager have had conversations which are confidential in nature to the rest of the staff and there are issues here that everyone else is not aware of. Please keep us informed of her progress.
  4. by   Mulan
    [quote=Daytonite Telling co-workers to just answer her questions and not to do anything for her is an indicator of why she was an "A" student.[/quote]

    How so? What do you mean by that? Are you saying that someone else did her work for her while in school and that is why she was an A student?

    Maybe I'm just missing the point.
  5. by   Daytonite
    Quote from Daytonite
    Telling co-workers to just answer her questions and not to do anything for her is an indicator of why she was an "A" student.
    Quote from Mulan
    How so? What do you mean by that? Are you saying that someone else did her work for her while in school and that is why she was an A student?
    No, I'm not saying that someone else did her work for her while she was in school. What I'm saying is that she takes initiative and wants to work out problems on her own. This indicates to me that she thinks about the problems that she's having. This is how many "A" students operate. They look at material and then attempt to apply it to situations. They'll tweak what they read until it starts to make sense to them. If she asks a question it's because she had trouble working something out on her own and needs a little hint or boost. Not wanting people to do anything for her indicates to me that she is engaging in organizing and time management and attempting to hone her skill at this. The very odd thing about this whole situation is her actual behavior. However, my experience as a manager and supervisor make me think that whatever her behavior problems are, her manager or other supervision staff are now aware of her behaviors since I'm sure a lot of people have reported it to them. There is a thing called confidentiality and some managers are very good about maintaining it and not blabbing the faults and personal problems of the people under their supervision to a worker's peers, which is as it should be.
  6. by   Mulan
    Quote from Daytonite
    No, I'm not saying that someone else did her work for her while she was in school. What I'm saying is that she takes initiative and wants to work out problems on her own. This indicates to me that she thinks about the problems that she's having. This is how many "A" students operate. They look at material and then attempt to apply it to situations. They'll tweak what they read until it starts to make sense to them. If she asks a question it's because she had trouble working something out on her own and needs a little hint or boost. Not wanting people to do anything for her indicates to me that she is engaging in organizing and time management and attempting to hone her skill at this. The very odd thing about this whole situation is her actual behavior. However, my experience as a manager and supervisor make me think that whatever her behavior problems are, her manager or other supervision staff are now aware of her behaviors since I'm sure a lot of people have reported it to them. There is a thing called confidentiality and some managers are very good about maintaining it and not blabbing the faults and personal problems of the people under their supervision to a worker's peers, which is as it should be.
    Thanks for the clarification. It wasn't clear (to me anyway) whether she herself was saying that or her manager was saying it. If she was saying it, then I agree.
  7. by   scooterRN52
    Quote from DutchgirlRN
    We have a new grad on our floor. We kept hearing that she was going to be so good. She graduated with a 4.0 and her parents are both physicians. Well, she is far from good.

    First of all the RN who is precepting her is from England and now she goes around speaking with a Britiish accent to everyone including the doctors. They kind of look at her like they are not taking her serious.

    Second she turns off her pager to chart. In the meantime her patients are asking for pain meds and she is ignoring them.

    Third, she is sooo very slow. She has been on orientation for a month and this week they have started letting her take her own patients (just 2 easy pts)and everything she does is being overseen by one of us. She says she knows how to do everything but you check on her and she's got the PB plugged in under the pump. I can take alot, I've been a preceptor for years and with some real challenges who have turned out to be very good nurses. The thing that really blows my mind is the fact that she has picked up the British accent. Fiona, our brit, has told her numerous times to cut it out and speak normally but has finally given up. I mean is she immature or what? Any opinions? Suggestions? Thanks!
    Maybe someone should ask her why she became a nurse? It sounds like she is immature, irresponsibe, and not serious about her profession.
  8. by   achot chavi
    The fact that the accent bothers you says more about you than her. HOW she says it counts for less than WHAT she is saying. Focus in on the content rather than the accent. It sounds to me as if you are jealous of the special treatment she is receiving. In truth I would be too and I would ask myself WHY she deserves such a light load. You didnt mention what kind of unit she is working on and what is the usual work load. I could remind you that when John Kennedy Jr. graduated law school and failed his exams before passing, He too received 'easy pitches' from his law office thereby 'protecting' him from further failures. I would wonder who is protecting this nurse and why. Regarding the turned off pager.... Is there a policy that she is breaking? If not leave it to her patients to complain... Its really between her and her patients unless you have to step in and do her work for her. I would also wonder what administrator or supervisor is willing to pay a full salary for half- work? There might be something else brewing and in any event unless you are personally affected I would keep my attentions to my workload and see to it that I am doing an excellent job (as role model). If it truly bothers you or affects your (or any) patient, you must right a memo explaining what is going on (keep it impersonal and very objective) to your supervisor (keep a copy for yourself) and if you are not satisfied with your supervisors response, send a copy of the memo to a higher authority. It might help if others co-sign your memo or write their own. In any case Good Luck
    Last edit by gwenith on Oct 12, '05 : Reason: TOS violation
  9. by   chadash
    I do find the accent troubling, in the face of the other problems mentioned. I thing this girl would be served well by some counseling on how to deal with the stress she is experiencing. It may be simple immaturity, or maybe she is carrrying some past abuse issues: who knows. In psychology, identification is allying with someone else and becoming like them in order to allay anxiety. In some cases, a person may associate with and emulate an admired person. At this level, though, it sounds very much like a childlike behavoir. Part of me feels that there is just a bit of growing up needed, but another part thinks outside help is needed so she doesnt end up in some disaster that breaks her instead of makes her.
  10. by   Daytonite
    Quote from achot chavi
    The fact that the accent bothers you says more about you than her. HOW she says it counts for less than WHAT she is saying. . .It sounds to me as if you are jealous of the special treatment she is receiving. . .
    It's not the accent, but the behavior that should be considered and jealousy has nothing to do with the situation.
    Regarding the turned off pager.... Is there a policy that she is breaking? If not leave it to her patients to complain... Its really between her and her patients unless you have to step in and do her work for her. . .I would keep my attentions to my workload and see to it that I am doing an excellent job (as role model).
    Leaving it to patients to complain that their requests are being ignored is not between the nurse and her patients! This is not the customer service window at a department store involving a complaint about merchandise or a sales person! :stone It a very serious issue of protecting the patients from neglect or harm as well as the hospital from potential litigation.
  11. by   DutchgirlRN
    Quote from QTipRN
    Are you just her co-worker, or are you in a supervisory position? How is it that you see everything she is doing wrong
    I am in a supervisory position and I never said she does everything wrong. I started this thread in the breakroom only to comment on her using her preceptors accent even though her preceptor has politely asked her to stop. I made the comment that she may be book smart but has no common sense.

    I can completely understand your anger at her lack of patient load, but honestly, if you are not her preceptor--its not your immediate concern.
    I have absolutely no anger (I don't know where that came from?) over how few patients she has. The problem is that with only 2-3 she can't get her act together and she been precepting for 12 wks now. My concern is that she is endangering her patients. She talks to the computer screen and talks to the TV screens in the patients rooms. Would you have confidence that your nurse was taking care of you when she stands in your room zoned out talking to the TV?
  12. by   DutchgirlRN
    The fact that the accent bothers you says more about you than her. HOW she says it counts for less than WHAT she is saying. Focus in on the content rather than the accent and you will have grown up.
    Yes it definately does say something about me. It says that if my preceptor who had been working with me so hard for 12 weeks asked me politely to cut it out, I would respectfully do so. Call me weird I guess..... What she is saying does count for alot. When you stare at the computer screen and the computer is off and you say "Giddup, Tonto lets go" and not bother to turn it on. Yep that's says something. When the patients complain that she is zoned out in front of the TV in their rooms and talking strangely, Yep that says something also. Now what's really funny is that I need to grow up !
    I won't even dignify that with an answer.

    It sounds to me as if you are jealous of the special treatment she is receiving.
    Jealous, um no, I prefer to receive respect from my co-workers and continue to receive good raises due to my high standard of work. I get plenty of special treatment for the good nurse and person I am.

    Is there a policy that she is breaking? If not leave it to her patients to complain... Its really between her and her patients unless you have to step in and do her work for her.
    :angryfire I don't know if it's actually written down somewhere but there's no reason that it should be. Any nurse who would turn her beeper off on a patient is unethical. Any nurse who is aware of the situation would be sadly amiss in her job to not report it. This by any nurses standard should be considered abandonment. I believe every nurse on this website would agree with me, right?

    I would also wonder what administrator or supervisor is willing to pay a full salary for half- work?
    Of course the hospital is paying her a full salary. She is still on orientation. I have seen them keep new grads on orientation for as long as 6 months as long as there is progress being made, even though it is slow, it takes a while for some nurses to get there routine going. Everyone is allowed to be different in that respect. This girl goes beyond what is normal and what is not normal and she does not continue to progress. As I have said before "I could care less if she makes it on med-surg or not" She may be cut out for something slower paced. I only think the whole accent thing is very disrespectful when you've been politely asked several times to cut it out. It also shows her level of maturity. Simple as that and that's all I've got to say about that.
    Last edit by DutchgirlRN on Oct 12, '05
  13. by   Thunderwolf
    Thanks, DutchgirlRN, for clarifying your position. This helps other posters from misreading the intent of your posts. You did this very tactfully. Thank you. I really feel for you. My take on this is very similar to your own. I'm very sorry that this has been occurring for you, your staff, and for your patients on the floor. 12 weeks in orientation, with 2-3 patients, and is unable to get her act together and function (especially with behaviors you mention) is NOT normal. Has EAP been presented as an option for her? There may be other unknown factors at work here that cannot be addressed on the floor or in orientation. Is EAP a part of your orientation process? I don't know...just a thought. Are staff documenting or just complaining? I hope things improve.

close