Is leaving before hurricane abandonment - page 5

Hello all, so I am located at the very end of south Florida near the keys! My question is simply this, I'm supposed to work weekend during this hurricane which some are saying could be deadly. I have... Read More

  1. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from remotefuse
    This hurricane is hitting my area on Saturday. I NEVER work Fri/Sat. I NEVER work friday say. Now all of a sudden I have to make arrangements for my kids, pets?
    I'm sure you realize that the hurricane calls for a change in plans for most people.
  2. by   nursej22
    Yeah, I reported it too, but didn't want to quote the poster. There is just something about that word that I find incredibly vulgar.
    Last edit by dianah on Sep 7 : Reason: continuity
  3. by   med/surgnursegirl
    This is a form of negligence in nursing with the unilateral termination of the provider-patient relationship, despite the patient's continued need for care. Patient abandonment occurs after a nurse has accepted responsibility for an assignment within the scheduled work shift.Oct 5, 2012

    you have to actually be at work and leave accepted a pastor to assignment and leave caring for them
  4. by   med/surgnursegirl
    This is a form of negligence in nursing with the unilateral termination of the provider-patient relationship, despite the patient's continued need for care. Patient abandonment occurs after a nurse has accepted responsibility for an assignment within the scheduled work shift.Oct 5, 2012
  5. by   Espy88
    Quote from med/surgnursegirl
    Patient abandonment occurs after a nurse has accepted responsibility for an assignment within the scheduled work shift.Oct 5, 2012

    you have to actually be at work and leave accepted a pastor to assignment and leave caring for them
    Hello,

    What if they try to give me the assignment towards the end of my workshift, after already working 2 days in a roll, also not even being scheduled for the weekend?
  6. by   greenerpastures
    Check with your facility. Ours has a policy that if one parent is "law enforcement" and the other is hospital personnel, you can be considered exempt because there isn't anyone to care for your children.
  7. by   Workitinurfava
    Use your own judgement and be prepared for the consequences. This is a tough one because technically you should be evacuating. Hmm....
  8. by   kbrn2002
    The negative feedback you've received for not already having in place doesn't really matter now. The fact is you don't have a solid plan in place. At this point being a parent comes way before being an employee. Get your child to safety and if you get fired for that so be it, you can replace your job but you can't replace your kid.
  9. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from kbrn2002
    The fact is you don't have a solid plan in place. At this point being a parent comes way before being an employee. Get your child to safety and if you get fired for that so be it, you can replace your job but you can't replace your kid.
    But have a plan for the next time!
  10. by   vintagemother
    Quote from greenerpastures
    Check with your facility. Ours has a policy that if one parent is "law enforcement" and the other is hospital personnel, you can be considered exempt because there isn't anyone to care for your children.
    That's beautiful. On a more serious note, I have great empathy for the OP. I'm a single parent RN. I do have an ex husband I could rely on if need be. If not him, I call his parents in a heart beat, if an urgent need for child care arises. It has once or twice when I needed to be at work or school. (My ex and his parents are *not* my favorite people to call in an emergency, BTW) My other back up child care is my best friend.

    I suppose I'm saying that all parents, single or otherwise, must have back up to back up child care available.

    This is not to say that I don't understand the dilemma the OP is facing.

    I hope all works out well for you.
  11. by   Chris831
    Hope this helps, in the nursing policy statement the ANA states:

    Duties under extreme conditions
    Healthcare professionals provide care under extreme conditions, thereby weighing their obligation to provide care with their own health and that of their families during emergencies.

    Take care of your family first.
    God bless.
    praying for all of you
  12. by   FolksBtrippin
    Quote from MunoRN
    Some states do actually have laws that require nurses to report to work in a declared disaster or prior to an predicted event or risk losing their license. It depends on your role, and there is usually some sort of requirement that you be notified of this in a certain time frame, but yes, depending on the state you could lose your license.
    I'd like to know how many people have lost their licenses for failing to report to work during a disaster. My guess is that number is somewhere between 0 and 0.
  13. by   dstee009
    If you are a HEALTH CARE worker then you know the dangers going in. Do what you want but you are not very good at your job if you want to flee when there could be danger. We are there to help those in need, imo, you are selfish and need not be in health care if your first instinct isnt to stay. get your family out or bring them to the hospital with you. People like OP are in it for the money, plain and simple. If you truly care about what you do as an RN, Dr. etc. then you wouldnt be TRYING to run. you would be trying to stay. I say all this as someone that sent my wife north a few days ago and without hesitation stayed to work through the storm here in Florida. if the medical field in the worst of times isnt for you, then you need to find another career.

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