is it oriented or orientated? - page 8

what words do you hear consistently mispronounced.....my pet peeve is when people wish to say oriented, as in alert and oriented, and they actually say orientated....where are they getting the extra... Read More

  1. by   PennyLane
    Wow you guys have some really bad speakers where you are. Most of these I haven't had the "pleasure" of hearing. What I can't stand is:

    loose vs. lose (someone else brought this up, too)
    affect vs. effect
    imply vs. infer
    alot vs. a lot
    less vs. fewer
    farther vs. further

    "ain't" really gets on my nerves. I hear that a lot in my neighborhood. This word should just never be uttered.

    Also when someone says, "Please give it to Susy or I". It's Susy or ME!

    I have a friend who says "intern" when she really means "internship". As in, "I'm going to try and get a summer intern at a _________". When you get this intern, can I play with him, too?
  2. by   P_RN
    Actually farther and further are both correct.
    http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?farther
  3. by   Mira
    Originally posted by cokie
    what words do you hear consistently mispronounced.....my pet peeve is when people wish to say oriented, as in alert and oriented, and they actually say orientated....where are they getting the extra a and t......
    :roll

    Sorry folks!Orientated is the term preferred in England.AbDOEmen instead of abdomen,oesophageal instead of esophageal.

    Nosocomical instead of nosocomial(just joking).

    aaaahhh... life in England is easier,not in a hurry to say things even in a tongue twister manner.
  4. by   norweaver
    Oriented- adjective per Webster's is the correct term. In your explanation, you quote the verb, orientate as also being correct. If you are speaking about what direction your patient is facing, you might be correct, but in terms of his mental status, per the Webster's definition, the adjective oriented only would be correct. Correct?
  5. by   PennyLane
    Originally posted by P_RN
    Actually farther and further are both correct.
    http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?farther
    Interesting. I had always been taught that they are used in different ways. As in you discuss or pursue something further, but if it's about physical space, you say farther. But it looks like they're interchangeable. Thanks for the link.
  6. by   P_RN
    It's just I had the occasion just yesterday to look it up.
  7. by   Jussurfin
    Originally posted by Mel D
    Interesting. I had always been taught that they are used in different ways. As in you discuss or pursue something further, but if it's about physical space, you say farther. But it looks like they're interchangeable. Thanks for the link.
    I, too, always thought and was taught to use "far" and "farther" when referring to physical distance, either in general or exact distances. The word "further" is used in the metaphoric sense as in furthering one's education.

    I think many words and phrases are bastardized over time. When enough people use and pronounce such words/terms incorrectly, they become acceptable.

    Many people say "close proximity." This is redundant. The word proximity by itself means "closeness." Thus anyone who says "close proximity" is actually saying "close closeness." The word proximity by itself will do just fine.

    As regards usage in writing:

    your vs. you're
    its vs. it's
    were vs. where
  8. by   nurs4kids
    Originally posted by mastiff38
    Irregardless instead of regardless.
    BUT..but...that's such an awesome sounding word..

    irregardless...it just flows..shows authority..

    even if it isn't a word. LOL
  9. by   nurs4kids
    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by mamabear
    One that really irkes me: DOO-co-lax instead of DULL-co-lax
    Do people think the manufacturers made a typo, but stuck with it anyway? Or is this just a Chicago-area thing

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    guilty..until a few weeks ago, I didn't know I was saying it wrong. A coworker happily pointed it out! lol

    so, then I was going to be sarcastic and called it "bis-K-O-DILL"...
    i give up
  10. by   PennyLane
    Originally posted by Jussurfin
    As regards usage in writing:

    your vs. you're
    its vs. it's
    were vs. where
    YES. I forgot about those. One of my profs makes its and it's mistakes, as well as misspelling tons of words. I guess he never heard of spell checker. It just drives me up the wall! I came close to correcting a word on a quiz he gave last night, but then thought better of it.
  11. by   kats
    The phrase "Oh, the humanity!". Isn't humanity a good thing? Do you think that the first one to say this meant to say "Oh, the inhumanity!"? I think that would make more sense when referring to something bad, don't you?
  12. by   AHarri66
    Originally posted by kats
    The phrase "Oh, the humanity!". Isn't humanity a good thing? Do you think that the first one to say this meant to say "Oh, the inhumanity!"? I think that would make more sense when referring to something bad, don't you?
    Actually, that phrase was uttered by a reporter (I forget his name) when the Hindenburg crashed. Correct or not, it's famous and needs to be quoted correctly.

    OH! How about their vs they're vs there???

    (I received a credit card offer today that said I could transfer my balances for free!!! Aaarrrgh!)
  13. by   PediRN
    ek-specially...grrrrr
    supposebly...double grrrr

close