I have 2 IV Pitocin Problems I need help with...

  1. 0
    First Calculation Problem: A patient is to receive 12 milliunits per minute of Pitocin. The directions for making up the fluid is to add 15 units of Pitocin to 1 liter of 5 % dextrose solution. Determine the rate of the IV in gtts/min and cc/hr using a drop factor of 40 gtts/ml.


    Second calculation problem: A patient is to receive 10 milliunits per minute of Pitocin. The directions for making up the fluid is to add 8 units of Pitocin to 1 liter of 5% dextrose solution. Using a drop factor of 60gtts/ml, determine how long (in hours) would the 1 liter IV fluid last in continuous infusion?
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  4. 13 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    :chuckle Uh,uh, sweetie. Do your own calculations.

    Yes, you can do it. Try again.
    racing-mom4 likes this.
  6. 0
    I hated math questions in school, I am so happy to be done with them. They always made them much harder in school than what they actually are in the real world.
  7. 0
    I've tried but was never taught to do this kind of IV calculation. I know all of the med calculations and the rest of the IV calculations. Pitocin calculations weren't taught in LPN nursing school. So if there's anybody out there with a heart, I'd appreciate a teaching lesson just for these 2 Pitocin questions. Thanks!
  8. 1
    ok sorry I tried but I am not getting one of the conversion factors wrong and can not find my nursing school math book. If you can find it you might try a book called nursing math simplified math magic it really helped me.
    Murgy likes this.
  9. 0
    Quote from Murgy
    First Calculation Problem: A patient is to receive 12 milliunits per minute of Pitocin. The directions for making up the fluid is to add 15 units of Pitocin to 1 liter of 5 % dextrose solution. Determine the rate of the IV in gtts/min and cc/hr using a drop factor of 40 gtts/ml.


    Second calculation problem: A patient is to receive 10 milliunits per minute of Pitocin. The directions for making up the fluid is to add 8 units of Pitocin to 1 liter of 5% dextrose solution. Using a drop factor of 60gtts/ml, determine how long (in hours) would the 1 liter IV fluid last in continuous infusion?

    I can see problems with this in real practice: different admixtures. A big no-no! Safety issue! We do a standard 20 units pitocin in 1000 cc LR. That mixes to 1 mu/min equals 3 cc/hr on the pump.

    Also - a pump is a MUST for running pitocin!!
  10. 0
    Quote from RNLaborNurse4U
    I can see problems with this in real practice: different admixtures. A big no-no! Safety issue! We do a standard 20 units pitocin in 1000 cc LR. That mixes to 1 mu/min equals 3 cc/hr on the pump.

    Also - a pump is a MUST for running pitocin!!
    These are practice exam problems just to see if we could get the answer to the problem--not a real life IV problem. So are you saying there is no solution to either of these 2 IV problems?
  11. 0
    I think I have the answers but do you have the answers? I can help you but I have to know if what I have is right. I can show you how to get there. What r the final answers?
  12. 0
    If anyone else got the answers, will you PM me with them? I just spent 20 min trying to figure this out 1 yr out of nursing school and with no work experience so I'd really love the answers, lol... See how rusty I am....:chuckle
  13. 0
    I'm still in nursing school and have spent the weekend working on math problems in preparation for my upcoming clinical math test so here's what I got (I can only do dimensional analysis; I have to see my units):

    Question 1:
    Calculate the concentration of the solution:
    15 units added to 1000mL--
    15 units X 1000= 15000 munits
    15000 munits/1000 mL= 15 munits/mL

    drops/min:
    12 munits X 1mL X 40 gtt = 32 gtt
    min 15 munits mL min

    ml/hr:
    32 gtt X 1mL X 60 min = 48 ml
    min 40 gtt 1h h

    Question 2:
    Concentration of solution:
    8 units X 1000= 8000munits
    8000 munits/1000 mL= 8 munits/mL

    mL/hr:
    10 munits X 60 min X 1 mL = 75mL/hr
    min 1 h 8 munits

    hours solution will last:
    1000mL X 1 hr = 13.3h
    75ml

    I hope that is right.


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