I failed the interview personality test/survey! - page 2

I applied to a prestigious hospital as a CNA/PCT/Student nurse, and I made it to the 2nd round, which was a computerized personality test with the choices Strongly Agree, Moderately Agree, Slightly... Read More

  1. by   Quickbeam
    I've been in the corporate world since 1984 (and now waiting for my letter that will hopefully say I'm in nursing school in January). Having been subjected to Quality Circles, Total Quality Management, the 7 Habits, and the recent Customer Retention craze...
    Hey, what about paradigm-shifting? I had to sit through an 8 hour lecture on that for a job in the 90's. Someone chuckled all the way to the bank on that!

    Seriously, these are so stupid.
  2. by   DolphinRN84
    I had no idea some places used personality tests. From what I learned in my leadership class last semester, especially the Myers Briggs test, I thought it was illegal to use personality tests in order to determine whether the applicant should be hired or not. I don't know..it may just be me, but I'd love to hear more responses from others.
  3. by   pod184
    Quote from PeachPie
    The moral of this story: When they say that there is no right or wrong answer with these personality tests, it's bullcrap. Answer the way they want you to in order to get your foot in the door.
    I realize everyone is jumping on the bandwagon that personality tests are worthless, but I disagree. This place obviously was not a good match for you. Don't take it personally, thats just the way it is sometimes. That does not mean there is not a good place for you somewhere, it is just not this one.
    If this facility wants its employees to act/think in a certain way consistently, the way you handle conflict and handle yourself is absolutely pertinent before you start there. Consider this a life lesson; move on and be thankful you did not get a job to work with people who did just "pick the right answers"
  4. by   rn/writer
    When will upper management learn that rah-rah programs and short term gimmicks are no substitute for respect, fair pay, and decent working conditions. The most effective management tool is to model the behavior you want your staff to replicate. Employees can't help but be conduits for whatever flows from on high.
  5. by   prinsessa
    I worked for a company that made, sold and processed these "personality" tests. We called them integrity tests though. You would be surprised by some of the answers the applicants gave. Like "How many times per week do you do cocaine?" Some people would actually say that they did cocaine. Why would anyone say that they did cocaine? I don't know if these tests really work though. I think they show who can b/s the best
  6. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from rn/writer
    When will upper management learn that rah-rah programs and short term gimmicks are no substitute for respect, fair pay, and decent working conditions. The most effective management tool is to model the behavior you want your staff to replicate. Employees can't help but be conduits for whatever flows from on high.

    :yeahthat: :yeahthat: :yeahthat:
  7. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from rn/writer
    When will upper management learn that rah-rah programs and short term gimmicks are no substitute for respect, fair pay, and decent working conditions. The most effective management tool is to model the behavior you want your staff to replicate. Employees can't help but be conduits for whatever flows from on high.
    Agreed.

    Based on 15 years of working experience....uh NEVER? It seems to me that managment spends an enormous amount of energy doing team building and all this other crap, when the reality is employees want exactly what you listed. Respect, fair pay, and decent working conditions.

    There is a woman here that was working on her MBA, and one project she had was to send an anonymous survey to employees about what they want. The result was unanimously MORE pay (over tuition re-imbursement, flexible spending, and a host of other benefits).
  8. by   southern_rn_brat
    Quote from mvanz9999
    The same is true for me. Except in Chicago. Actually I DID fail their personality test. What I was told is that they take your scores, compare it to the scores of currently working police officers, and based on your closeness to that, you pass/fail. Based on the number of questions, I have no idea what they are looking for. No joke: One question was if I fantasized about having sex with a squirrel.

    It's a complete joke. I wouldn't put any faith in the test. I think it's likely that you DID do yourself a favor by "not passing". You'd only be miserable there.

    so how did you answer THAT question?
  9. by   HisTreasure
    I was so happy when I read this. Why? Because about three years ago I applied to Wal-Mart to work during the holiday season and bring in some additional income. I had an impressive resume (and heck, it was JUST Walmart; some of the people who work there have the personalities God gave a boot!) so I figured I would be an easy hire. Nope. Did the computerized personality test, and failed. I used to work at Target some 5 years ago and IT was easier to get into than Walmart. I think those so called "personality" tests are a crock. I am very well liked and personable; I have excellent customer service skills and I do a good job when I am at work. But I'm honest. That was my downfall.
    Question: Have you ever stolen anything?
    My thought process: EVER? Sure, when I was 7 I stole a Disney Adventures magazine. I bragged about it to my brother, who in turn told my parents, who drove me back to the grocery store to return it and apologize. Obviously it traumatized me because I still remember. Was it wrong? Absolutely. Have I stolen anything since. Not at all. But have I EVER stolen anything?
    Answer to the question: Yes.

    Result: You failed. Thank you for applying...

    Bah, humbug!
    Last edit by HisTreasure on Sep 27, '06
  10. by   mvanz9999
    Quote from southern_rn_brat
    so how did you answer THAT question?
    Of course I do! It's only a fantasy, right.

    (Kidding of course).
  11. by   PeachPie
    Quote from Melina
    While I agree that personality tests can be outrageous, 'customer service' is not a dirty phrase. Our patients ARE our customers.

    ~Mel'
    Uh, they asked nothing about patient care, my ability to perform skills etc. All they cared about were the kind of social expectations I'd be expected to perform if I was working at Wal-mart, not if I was a competent CNA. The customer service that they have in mind and the customer service that you have in mind are nothing alike. All they care about is the customer being happy, not about recovering. I could see myself being chewed out by management if an NPO complained about being thirsty or if a crabby old lady didn't like how close I was standing next to her while taking her blood pressure or if a woman complained about her baby being taken away even though the baby was turning blue or a hysterical mom complaining that her pre-op baby is hungry.

    When will upper management learn that rah-rah programs and short term gimmicks are no substitute for respect, fair pay, and decent working conditions. The most effective management tool is to model the behavior you want your staff to replicate. Employees can't help but be conduits for whatever flows from on high.
    Never, but maybe they'd be a little less stupid if they weren't so afraid to get their hands dirty. My dad is a teacher, and he says that teaching is another field with all too much rah-rah "new and improved" projects, the most recent being No Child Left Behind.
    Last edit by PeachPie on Sep 27, '06
  12. by   Indy
    The "no child left behind" crap has got my daughter's teachers trying to make goals she can reach, instead of working on things she needs to do regardless of how difficult they are for her. (special ed- their IEP's actually dwarf my careplans from nursing school.) They have to do that to show progress, regardless of disability. So, they're still trying to teach literacy and math, but the goals make it look like they're concentrating on washing her face and brushing her teeth, and being able to order meals at taco bell. I wish I was kidding! I'm so glad I'm not a teacher!
  13. by   texas_lvn
    My Favorite one is "Are you a risk taker".

    Lets see, I ride a motorcycle, speed on occasion (everyone does at one point or another, bo flaming!), have jumped outta airplanes, love to skydive, love to bungee jump, addicted to roller coaster rides, have a tattoo of my kids name on my arm, own a gun (and know how to use it in the country on a target),

    No, I am not a risk taker.:smackingf

close