How many quit??? - page 2

I've heard that a large % of people who start the nursing program drop out - what is your experience in this? I'm worried about going so much in debt and not being able to finish the program once I... Read More

  1. by   SugarMagnoliaMom
    Hi! I have a BA in Public Relations, i became close with two other students who both wanted to pursue Hospital P.R. Both had transfered to my University from Nursing programs, once they started their nursing degree both found they didn't want to be a nurse, but did want to work in healthcare.
  2. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from SugarMagnoliaMom
    Hi! I have a BA in Public Relations, i became close with two other students who both wanted to pursue Hospital P.R. Both had transfered to my University from Nursing programs, once they started their nursing degree both found they didn't want to be a nurse, but did want to work in healthcare.
    I've always tell friends/ others that are interested in Nursing to go work in a hospital as a CNA for 6 months first. That way, they'll get a first hand look at both the good and bad parts of Nursing.

    I figure that if they work in the hospital and see the day to day activities of nurses, and they still want to go through a Nursing program, they'll stick with with it.

    I've only had person do the CNA route and then go through a Nursing program. The others got a reality check and decided that Nursing was not what they expected and went on to do other careers.
  3. by   NeuroICURN
    In my class.......

    Started with 45
    Lost 17 by the end of the second semester
    By the graduation (2 year program), we graduated 21.

    It was a REALLY tough program and most of the ones that left did so because they failed and had no choice. I can only think of 1 that left because of personal reasons and 1 was kicked out for conduct reasons (even though the fight was because he had failed a test big time).

    Our pass rate for first time on boards though (for my class) was 95%...only 1 didn't pass first time. Two years before it was 100%.

    Like the previous poster said....it depends on you and what kind of student that you know you are.
    Last edit by NeuroICURN on Jul 20, '04
  4. by   Destinystar
    do not define yourself based on what everyone else is doing. persistence always pays off. the most important thing you must invest into your nursing education is your time. if you have the time i bet you will succeed. if you have studied for hours i bet you will pass your test. let me know how you do on your test. k? a&p was nothing but memorization. like i had to read everything 3 times. just like learning a foreign language. had to take microbiology and chemistry twice. but you know what i didnt give up and neither should you.
    Quote from deb123j
    i've heard that a large % of people who start the nursing program drop out - what is your experience in this? i'm worried about going so much in debt and not being able to finish the program once i start.guess i'm feeling kinda dumb today - have a test and as usual feel totally unprepared even though i've studied for hours!!
    any tips on studying for a&p???
  5. by   KacyLynnRN
    In my LPN class we started with 60 and graduated 24. I am now in an LPN to RN program that last year's class started with 33, graduated 30. Somewhat relieved by that...
  6. by   confused101
    I am going into my junior year for a BSN program. Thank God I haven't failed a class yet. We started out over 100 people in the class. I think we are about 80's now. It is a private college and our standards are super high. They did the whole your butts mine technique at the first of all of this. I don't understand not getting through. I have been working part time, have a husband, and had to have surgery this past spring and I can do it just fine. I guess it is that drive that determines if you are going to make it or not.
  7. by   OneRN
    Our level 1 started with 51, but only 22 of those 51 graduated at the end. Some quit, some didn't pass. Nursing school has a high drop out rate because it is extremely tough, academically and personally, or at least our school was. I strongly encourage you to think twice about going into nursing school if you are having trouble in A&P. I don't mean to be such a pessimist, and even though I did well in nursing school, I still find it difficult to recommend to others.

    Nursing is only a great career if you love it. I love it. But if it were just a job, it would be the worst thing in the world.
  8. by   Energizer Bunny
    I'm not going anywhere either! And if I even suggest it, you all have my permission to kick my hiney from here to the moon! FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION!!!

    But, I have to wonder.....in some of my classes already, there are people that just want to know enough to pass the test. EVEN IN CPR! They don't care if they know it or not, they just want to pass. These people scare me if they actually make it through.
  9. by   Sheri257
    There was a rumor that the attrition rate at my school (failures, dropouts, etc.) was about 40 percent.

    But, when I actually checked with the administrators, it was more like 11 percent.

    So, don't believe everything you hear. Rumors run rampant on this stuff, just like anything else.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jul 21, '04
  10. by   Quickbeam
    While no one dropped out of my nursing school class (it was very small), by the one year anniversary, half were already out of nursing. By 5 years, 75 % were out and now, almost 20 years later, I am the only one of my class still working as a nurse. Do I win something? :chuckle
  11. by   Deb123j
    Quote from Quickbeam
    While no one dropped out of my nursing school class (it was very small), by the one year anniversary, half were already out of nursing. By 5 years, 75 % were out and now, almost 20 years later, I am the only one of my class still working as a nurse. Do I win something? :chuckle
    WHY??? From what I've read - I know that nursing isn't an easy profession. But 1 - you've gotta know somewhat what you're getting into, 2 - you have a desire to help people, & 3 - you spend a heck of a lot of $ on education. I just can't understand why so many people have quit????? I'm bound and determined to go all the way - my only concern is if I'm smart enough.
  12. by   Daryn
    A lot of people dropped out of our program at St. John's School of Nursing in Springfield, MO, but if you are determined and are persistant you should be able to get through nursing school. It simply takes work and prioritizing your time. If you really want to get through it all you will!

    Quote from Deb123j
    I've heard that a large % of people who start the nursing program drop out - what is your experience in this? I'm worried about going so much in debt and not being able to finish the program once I start.
    Guess I'm feeling kinda dumb today - have a test and as usual feel totally unprepared even though I've studied for hours!!
    Any tips on studying for A&P???
  13. by   Quickbeam
    I can only speak from what I saw with my class which was , as I said, very small. We were also all returning adult students who all already had a bachelor's degree.

    The first big loss of active practitioners was to motherhood. Many of my fellow students had a baby before their first year anniversary in practice as an RN and never went back to any form of work (outside the home). As a variation on that, a few went right on to graduate school, got an MSN, then had the baby and never returned to work outside the home.

    2 Left nursing to sell real estate. 1 is now a financial planner and one sells yachts. Since we were older, by the five year point, a few had already retired. Now, more have retired or are working a "low stress" part time job as a non-nurse. I want to add that everyone seems happy...just not in nursing.

    This has made me think of a summation point....success in nursing school (my class was very competitive) can be very different than success in the day to day work of a nurse. I think once the grade grubbing, "thrill of the hunt" of academia was gone, a few of my peers found they really didn't like the actual work of the nurse. But then, you could say that about any professional training program. Most of us have known MDs who really hate working with patients. My cousin loved the rush of getting into medical school and the learning...just hated sick people. He's a lawyer now!

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