How many nurses do their own vitals??? - page 3

Hi all, Well at my one place they just posted something stating that since they are so short on PCTs that the RNs will be responsible for doing their first set of vitals. This, I feel is insane. ... Read More

  1. by   kimmicoobug
    Ok, I just read my post and realized that I sounded a little snotty in my post. I should say that there is a charge nurse who is notoriously lazy. The other charges are just as hardworking as the rest of us.
  2. by   canoehead
    I couldn't consider an assessment complete unless I took the vital signs. I do my own, and I think would find it hard to change.
  3. by   Blackcat99
    When I work in nursing homes it is usually the responsibility of the CNA's to get the vital signs. I must tell you what happened at a nursing home many many years ago. A patient had died 3 days ago. However, her vital signs were still being charted and they were in the normal range. I went and got the director of nurses and showed her the vital signs sheet. I said "Isn't this amazing the patient has been dead for 3 days but look her vital signs are still normal" I'll never forget how angry she got. Her face was really really beet red :angryfire
    I thought she was going to have a stroke! I don't know if she ever found out who did it.
  4. by   canoehead
    Was the patient even still in the bed? Jeepers, my boss would blow a sneaker over that one.
  5. by   nekhismom
    I do my own. In NICU, it would be simply ridiculous NOT to do my own. Our techs help feed and rock babies, will give baths, change beds, etc, but RARELY will they do vitals.
  6. by   yayanurse
    I work in a small 25 bed facility. We do team nursing so we are fortunate to have an aide do our vs. But it requires good communication between all of us on the team to know when the vitals are out of norm, when it's the machine, what is normal for that particular patient. etc. I think I would rather do my own vitals with assessments, but i'ts a time thing too. The docs want the vitals before rounds and if BP and cardiac meds have parameters that affects the dose, you need to know the vs before administration.
  7. by   suzanne4
    Dead and vital signs still being charted. Another reason why I always preferred to do my own.
  8. by   pcelest2003
    Nurses, nurses, nurses! I'm a tech in a busy PICU, and also work as a tech in Rehab. I personally believe that all nurses should at least get there first set of v\s. I work second shift and often come behind PCT's that are totally incompetent when it comes to measuring accurate vitals. For example, I've worked in a neonatal or peds setting for years. Some PCTs that work on an adult floor have charted a 24hr babies resp as 16-18bpm. So, I agree with some of the nurses, and some of you need to stop whining. Really, how can you really do a complete assesment without knowing doing them yourself. When I finish RN school, I'll probably do mine, just because It makes me feel safe and my patient. Hell, even as a pct I go behind some nurses, because lets be honest, we may not have the formal education, but when it comes to beside care we can run circles around some new grads, and it is quite astonishing to find out how many RN's cant do basic assesments. It;s just a shame that there are some very sharp PCT's in some setting, but in other settings it shocks me to see what's going on. Especially, the patient that was dead for 3 days, with normal vital signs. V/S signs are so fundalmental. Why not know how to measure them.
  9. by   Tweety
    Quote from pcelest2003
    Nurses, nurses, nurses! I'm a tech in a busy PICU, and also work as a tech in Rehab. I personally believe that all nurses should at least get there first set of v\s..
    There are always two sides, and each day is different. Our nurse-patient ratios are high because we have techs on the floor, it's built into the system. When you have six patients or more, it is a big deal to have to take vitals sometimes. If nurses are expected to do total care including vitals, then the ratio should be appropriate to the tasks assigned.

    If I have four patients, then yes, it's no big deal. But if I have seven help me out a little.

    Too often there is one tech for 30 patients, and the nurses have the same ratio as if there were three techs, then everyone's stressed. :angryfire
    Last edit by Tweety on Mar 13, '04 : Reason: typos of course.
  10. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    My motto now, being the only aide/tech/extern on my floor with 35 pts.: You want your vitals done at this exact time on this exact pt.? Then you're going to have to do it yourself, because 3 other nurses just asked for the same darn thing.
  11. by   Elenaster
    Well since we do a minimum of hourly VS (or more frequent), I always do my own. Occasionally, if I'm in a crunch, I'll ask another nurse to do them for me, but even that is rare. We do have one CNA who is in nursing school and I will let her do my vitals sometimes, but just because she's very enthusiastic about learning and not because she's required to.

    In ICU, it's very important to watch for trends and subtle changes in VS because patients are so unstable. Preventing them from crashing and burning is much more appealling than have to deal with a code.

    We also have some crazy parameters for certain patients and the MDs may want their SBP to be in the 180-200 range. No matter how fabulous a CNA we may have, he/she is simply not trained to deal with all these variations.
  12. by   MandyInMS
    Seems like Tweety and I are alone in this vital signs debate. I am not now nor have I ever been a lazy nurse.When we do have an assistant do do our vitals they are usually all done shortly after we get out of report, so we have time to reveiw them, recheck abnormals,ect..this is SO helpful with 7-8 pt ratio.Gives me time to do a quick chart check, grab my steth,pulse ox and give more time for my actual physical assessment...oh, and while I'm doing my assessment , if they are poopie I change them, if they need a prn I get it for them, if they want juice,a blanket, whatever they need..which is always something.. I do that as well..I'm not lazy or uncaring..just overworked and overwhelmed most nights...I am not alone...we all help each other on our shift which is a MUST..whatever the task..I wish to goodness I only had a FEW pts and had time to do my own vitals...maybe I'm just talking to myself here.....sighs :/
  13. by   bellehill
    Quote from MandyInMS
    Seems like Tweety and I are alone in this vital signs debate. I am not now nor have I ever been a lazy nurse.When we do have an assistant do do our vitals they are usually all done shortly after we get out of report, so we have time to reveiw them, recheck abnormals,ect..this is SO helpful with 7-8 pt ratio.Gives me time to do a quick chart check, grab my steth,pulse ox and give more time for my actual physical assessment...oh, and while I'm doing my assessment , if they are poopie I change them, if they need a prn I get it for them, if they want juice,a blanket, whatever they need..which is always something.. I do that as well..I'm not lazy or uncaring..just overworked and overwhelmed most nights...I am not alone...we all help each other on our shift which is a MUST..whatever the task..I wish to goodness I only had a FEW pts and had time to do my own vitals...maybe I'm just talking to myself here.....sighs :/
    You're not talking to yourself, I agree completely. Getting VS on 7 patients, calling the MD for various problems, doing neuro assessments and passing meds is a little stressful. Forgot to mention the requests for food, water blankets, bathroom trips...I help with. If my tech can't do my VS because they are busy fine. If I can't trust my tech to tell my about problems then there is no point in them being there. I love to hear nursing students say how they are going to do things when they graduate...it doesn't work like that at least not at my hospital.

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