How do you really feel about 5-star rooms? - page 4

Our hospital has new "5-star" rooms (you know with a chef, etc.) What is your reaction to this type of thing and "how does it make you feel"? I'd really like to know what other nurses think about... Read More

  1. by   Dixiecup
    Quote from eak16
    so the rich have the right to be kept more comfortable than others??? Do they also deserve more pain meds?? What about lower nursing ratios?? While wer'e on it, what about completely separate hospitals where they dont have to be bothered by non-rich folks at all. (oh wait, we have those... :stone )
    if the food is really that bad and the blankets are really that thin for the general population, it should all be upgraded.
    Unfortunately, the answer to all those questions is yes. Such is life.
  2. by   Berta
    sigh....
    Here's my 2 cents worth. I worked for a business that decided to cater to its "5 star customers". Know what happens? Pretty soon, you are told to take care of the 5 stars first because they generate more money. 5 stars got a private number that put them ahead of other customers so they get served first. "5 stars" get things done first and better because they will generate more revenue by making them want to come back in the future.

    So, I see the same thing happening with health care. This is not a new concept. Its one that has been used in the business field for quite a while. It is a huge money maker. But pretty soon, there become more and more "5 stars" and then no one gets preference. Just think along the lines of your own preferred customer cards. Does it really get you anywhere? Same theory....
  3. by   Brickman
    I just don't understand why anyone would be bothered by this. The five star rooms don't come with better health care, it's the non essentials that are upgraded and the patient has to pay the difference out of pocket. I think one of the worst things that people can do is judge how someone else spends their money. I am sure that I could look at anyones spending habits and find countless injustices, but I choose not to.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Five star room? What is it a hospital or a hotel?????
  5. by   maddiecat
    Quote from redwinggirlie
    Five star room? Does that mean your family will be there to dip your lobster for you?
    There are special suites where the family can stay in their own cozy beds...I really appreciate all of your responses....I guess for myself I don't have a problem with the concept; I just get sensitive about the way people think of nurses and don't want any more negative images....it's also my understanding in our hospital that the nurses take care of only those patients; they don't "cross over" to the other side..
  6. by   TiffyRN
    I would go back to med-surg nursing to work in a 5 star environment if it was guaranteed to have lower nurse to patient ratios. I assume these 5 star patients would understand that one way to get better "service" (care) would be for their nurse not to be in charge of 3 or 4 patients, not 6, 7 or 8 patients (or more).

    I always prided myself in trying to do all I could above and beyond basic nursing care for my assignment, little extras like finding the special snacks or fluffier pillows or so on. But there is only so much I could do with the other mandated tasks for a large assignment. I would love the freedom of having the time to give the kind of care I know would make my patients more comfortable. Is it fair that only a segment of the population would get this? I'm not sure about fair but. . . Not every large family gets a 4-5 bedroom house leaving couples without kids to live in small apartments. That's not the way things are distributed here in the good ole' USA.
  7. by   Stitchie
    My question would be, would these "five-star" suites be used at high census periods when there has to be more room in the hospital for patients? Instead of giving the impression of 'vip service' why not just encourage the family to hire a private duty nurse or let the family provide some TLC?

    Or does this mean just a larger rooms to accomodate more family?Then heck yes, bring it on, but I think ethically the country club set has to stay on the floor with the great unwashed if that's the way the bed coordinator works it out.

    I don't really care how someone wants to waste their money but this seems like an ethical quagmire. I think it also reinforces the stereotypes that nurses are hired hands and not professionals.

    Of course, I'd be the first one outraged when someone gets a direct admit to the floor of 'VIP rooms' instead of my 'been-waiting-for-8-hours-it's-one-in-the-morning' CHF'er with Medicare in the ER.

    I believe the ethics would be violated; we're supposed to treat people equally. And the EMTALA laws are taken seriously; how is this one going to fly?
  8. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from llg
    I think it is very interesting that people who espouse respect for everybody, different cultures, meeting everyone's needs, etc. sometimes have no problem being critical of the needs of the wealthy. People who are accustomed to living at a high socio-economic level should not have to sacrifice their socio-cultural needs any more than people who have cultural needs based on ethnicity or religion. But somehow, even among "caring" people, it is OK to "bash" them for having those needs.

    llg
    I object to this whole hotel type atmosphere hospitals try to sell. And if the rich want to pay for these fancy 'needs' fine...what I object to is someone telling ME as a nurse it is my job to provide servitude or special treatment to them, because they are 'somebody'. I am a nurse and I provide nursing care to ALL patients. When my supervisors whisper to me "There's a VIP in Bed1' I answer "All my patients are VIPs". I will object to being told I should work harder to please a wealthy patient. I think it is the family's job to cater to whims, personally I as the nurse don't have time...they are in the hospital for skilled nursing care and observation.

    If the rich want 5 star service I'm sure they will find hospitals and nurses who would prefer to cater to them than work in the county hospital, but it ain't gonna be me.
  9. by   Stitchie
    Quote from mattsmom81
    I object to this whole hotel type atmosphere hospitals try to sell. And if the rich want to pay for these fancy 'needs' fine...what I object to is someone telling ME as a nurse it is my job to provide servitude or special treatment to them, because they are 'somebody'. I am a nurse and I provide nursing care to ALL patients. When my supervisors whisper to me "There's a VIP in Bed1' I answer "All my patients are VIPs". I will object to being told I should work harder to please a wealthy patient. I think it is the family's job to cater to whims, personally I as the nurse don't have time...they are in the hospital for skilled nursing care and observation.

    If the rich want 5 star service I'm sure they will find hospitals and nurses who would prefer to cater to them than work in the county hospital, but it ain't gonna be me.
    Mattsmom,

    Exactly. Equal healthcare treatment is what is a right in this country, regardless of ability to pay. There's too much gray area here for ethical problems: if this 5-star hospital ED is the nearest facility to stabilize a gang-banger GSW victim, do they have the right to refuse her?

    Bad idea. Too many logistical nightmares from my POV.
  10. by   LaShell
    I work in a transitional care unit that caters to wealthy people. Seems to me there are as many obnoxious rich people as there are poor people.

    We do get some snobs who manage to wiggle into any conversation how much money they have. I'm always tempted to say, "yes, I noticed when I was wiping your butt that your poop has a better smell than others"... or when changing a dressing, "Oh, your pus is just glowing!!"

    I loved the lady who was often bragged how much money her and her husband had donated to the local university ($100,000) but wouldn't pay $40 for van transportation to a clinic appointment.

    And even though our facility looks great on the outside, we still run out of linen and supplies, and the food still stinks!
  11. by   hogan4736
    Quote from chris_at_lucas
    ... Or better yet, consider that we in the western world live incredibly better than 95 percent (or more) of the rest of the world's population. In order to be fair, everything you own will now be distributed to others who are less fortunate. Never mind that you worked hard to get where you are, and for the most part your timing and luck happened to be pretty good, that doesn't matter.

    Kinda puts it in a different perspective....
    Our taxes ARE distributed to many others in the form of state aid...To some who need it and to some who don't...I have worked hard to get where I am, and when I see someone who is NOT down on his luck sucking off the syatem, it burns me, as it should all of us...

    sean
  12. by   hogan4736
    Quote from Berta
    sigh....
    Here's my 2 cents worth. I worked for a business that decided to cater to its "5 star customers". Know what happens? Pretty soon, you are told to take care of the 5 stars first because they generate more money. 5 stars got a private number that put them ahead of other customers so they get served first. "5 stars" get things done first and better because they will generate more revenue by making them want to come back in the future.

    So, I see the same thing happening with health care. This is not a new concept. Its one that has been used in the business field for quite a while. It is a huge money maker. But pretty soon, there become more and more "5 stars" and then no one gets preference. Just think along the lines of your own preferred customer cards. Does it really get you anywhere? Same theory....
    Bingo Berta...NIce point of view...

    Thanks,

    sean
  13. by   DOCS RN
    I think it stinks.....Where I work it is called SHU or Special Housing Unit. Everything delivered to you, too bad you only get to leave that unit for one hour every 24.....

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