Health Profession & Wacko's - page 5

Anybody else noticed how many "wacko's" seemed to be attracted to this line of work? I have some theories about this phenomena.... Read More

  1. by   danh3190
    This would be an excellent topic for a psychology paper, or maybe a PhD dissertation, research on mental health problems or perhaps personality disorders in health care professionals. Is there a disproportionate problem? If so is it because the profession attracts "whckos" or does the stress of the profession "whack" people?

    I agree with some of the earlier posters. I saw some really really strange people in my previous career as a chemist. In that case I thought of the strangeness was a result of their only being interested in one aspect of life, i.e., their career. So they didn't have very well rounded personalities.
  2. by   EricJRN
    Quick moderator note:

    I'm glad to see this thread going back in a positive direction. Just keep in mind that when you see an offensive or attacking post, you should click on the 'Report Bad Post' icon rather than responding to it. I know it's natural to want to fire something back, but please resist the urge.
  3. by   jill48
    I don't really understand the question. But I am sure of one thing. My husband is a high rise window washer, and there are a PLETHERA of wackos in that profession. I guess they would have to be.:lol_hitti
  4. by   shoegalRN
    I work at a phone company and let me tell you, there is a little bit of "everything" that has been mentioned on this post. I've seen people go out on leave for being bi-polar, manic depressive, sucidial, homosidial, on Xnanx, Prozac, addicted to Valium, Oxycotin, or any other type of prescribed pain med they can get a hold of. So, it's not just in the nursing field.
  5. by   jaylynn67
    Exactly, there are strange people everywhere.
  6. by   hollyvk
    Quote from danh3190
    This would be an excellent topic for a psychology paper, or maybe a PhD dissertation, research on mental health problems or perhaps personality disorders in health care professionals. Is there a disproportionate problem? If so is it because the profession attracts "whckos" or does the stress of the profession "whack" people?
    My observations of the whackos/maladjusted in the nursing ranks is that many are drawn to the caregiver role as it was one they were raised with. I also think many in nursing want to deliver the kind, compassionate care that they would have liked to have received when they were younger.

    I don't find these folks to be psychotic or have personality disorders, they're just a bit dysfunctional. There are probably a multitude of descriptors that could apply: co-dependent, self-sacrificing, nurturing, submissive, victims of abuse. And, of course, many find it easier to care for others and focus on that rather than address their own wounds.

    So when your peers are being a bit "whacko" please remember that they could benefit from some (non-enabling) compassion from you. The "theraputic use of self" can apply to coworkers as well as to patients. :icon_hug:

    HollyVK, RN, BSN, JD
    (who still prefers the company of healthcare professionals to that of legal professionals)
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from ceecel.dee
    I think "wacko" is in the eye of the beholder. My definition may vary greatly from yours, and I doubt it does much for the profession to profile it just this way.

    Have to agree with this.

    And also, for those who are sensitive to the term 'wacko,' perhaps by some all that should be seen of a thread containing the word would be the title only.

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