FIVE-STAR experience in a Luxury Hospital? - page 4

recently i came across an article in nursing spectrum magazine called "nurses help create a five-star experience" in summary: for paying extra $350-450/day out of pocket, patient can be... Read More

  1. by   Lenap
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I can almost see that as being some sort of therapy though. For the pt. to be getting back to their daily activities (aside from all the cable TV channels available).

    We once had a CEO (only way i knew this was that he did his own TV commercials) who had a colon resection, and as soon as he could, he was sitting up using his laptop for business purposes.
    Once I had a 18yo girl using her laptop to research her newly diagnosed disease. She used computer to look up normal values for her labs, learn treatment options..etc. I have a lot of respect for patients who are involved in their own care. Not those concerned about eating steak or duck or those expecting massages.
  2. by   gobo7110
    I agree partly with all of you. There are some appauling places to work out there and some awfull aswell as excellent nurses. I feel sad that some places have a two tiered system for the rich and poor but unfortunatly as the saying goes 'you get what you pay for'. There is nowhere exempt from the two tiered system. I am a community nurse and unfortunatly have had the opportunity to experience this first hand. There are a few patients on our caseload that are affluent people and know their rights. These are pandered to by some nurses as they want to be seen as giving the best service ( that is:- appointments by convienience of the person etc) whereas the others such as myself who may have to wait for a nurse all day. This is only one example. There are many more. The GP's around here are the same. Will only do home calls for certain people and believe me if I have seen a patient and wish for a GP callout it is for a good reason. I have been personally repremanded for doing this. Is this not my job? If it is not then what is. Sorry if I have digressed a bit!! The article in question beggers belief as I feel that in the NHS all sould have the same high quality treatment and care. If you want private arrange to go elsewhere where the normal people cannot feel inferior.
  3. by   CraigB-RN
    making blanket staements about not working for 5-star hospitals because if you wanted to work in a hotel you would have applied at one, is a little short sighted.

    Look at the hosptal as a whole. Yes there are some there that ignore nursing staff when they develop these programs, but there are soime hostitals that actually include nursing in the planning and development. Nurses can actually benifit from this arrangement if the hospital wants to make sure that it has the best nurses possible for their patients.

    As to the comment about if the patient starts thinking about a massage then it's time for them to be discharged. Well I may just have been doing this to long, but I remember when we actually used to give "massages" to out patients under the guise of backrubs and skin care. And for some reason I actually found time to provide backrubs to most of my 10-12 patients. But then they weren't as sick as they are now. And no I won't tell you how long ago that was.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    making blanket staements about not working for 5-star hospitals because if you wanted to work in a hotel you would have applied at one, is a little short sighted.
    No, actually i see the bigger picture on it, which is why i still say no to it, for my work, and my personal healthcare.

    That statement was made for my own career choice, and why, and not what's best for others'.
  5. by   llg
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Almost choked on my soup when i read this.

    When i take care of my pts. "comfort and emotional needs", i couldn't give a flying rat's rear how much money that have don't have, nor is it even on my mind, since their health comes first.

    I have had pts. who have said "i'm paying CASH to be here, that pays your salary" as if the fact that they're paying cash means they deserve preferential treatment. Of course that doesn't sit well with me, since one pt. in my care will not be treated any better than the other. That's not discrimination. That's equality.

    As for the five-star hospitals, someone else can work there, but i won't. Not because it'll be the wealthy that will go there, but if i wanted to work in a hotel-like atomosphere, i would apply to work at a hotel.
    I'm sorry if I didn't make myself clear, causing you to misinterpret my remarks. I have never said, nor intended to say, that we should be nicer to rich people than to poor people ... or that rich people are entitled to be rude ... or that rich people are entitled to more qualified care givers ... or anything like that. My point is that ALL people should be treated with kindness and consideration and that ALL people should have their psycho-social needs included in their care even if they are rich. The fact that they are rich should not cause nurses to belittle their needs just because we personally do not share their lifestyle.

    Also, as I said repeatedly, providing extra services for those willing to pay extra (such as a private room, or a private duty nurse, or a more expensive physical environment) should not come at the expense of the other patients. That would be wrong.

    As nurses, we should be prepared to take care of all patients from all cultures and respect their cultural differences -- as long as it doesn't hurt the other patients. That's true of patients from a different country ... or from a different religion ... or a different socio-economic class.

    llg
  6. by   subee
    Quote from llg
    I'm sorry if I didn't make myself clear, causing you to misinterpret my remarks. I have never said, nor intended to say, that we should be nicer to rich people than to poor people ... or that rich people are entitled to be rude ... or that rich people are entitled to more qualified care givers ... or anything like that. My point is that ALL people should be treated with kindness and consideration and that ALL people should have their psycho-social needs included in their care even if they are rich. The fact that they are rich should not cause nurses to belittle their needs just because we personally do not share their lifestyle.

    Also, as I said repeatedly, providing extra services for those willing to pay extra (such as a private room, or a private duty nurse, or a more expensive physical environment) should not come at the expense of the other patients. That would be wrong.

    As nurses, we should be prepared to take care of all patients from all cultures and respect their cultural differences -- as long as it doesn't hurt the other patients. That's true of patients from a different country ... or from a different religion ... or a different socio-economic class.

    llg

    I was offended when "patient" became "client" (hookers have clients; I always had patients). As long as I don't have to refer to them as "guests"!
  7. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from subee
    I was offended when "patient" became "client" (hookers have clients; I always had patients). As long as I don't have to refer to them as "guests"!
    All of my nursing books have used the word "client" but i have yet to hear this word at all where i work.
  8. by   mommy2boys
    Quote from llg
    I'm sorry if I didn't make myself clear, causing you to misinterpret my remarks. I have never said, nor intended to say, that we should be nicer to rich people than to poor people ... or that rich people are entitled to be rude ... or that rich people are entitled to more qualified care givers ... or anything like that. My point is that ALL people should be treated with kindness and consideration and that ALL people should have their psycho-social needs included in their care even if they are rich. The fact that they are rich should not cause nurses to belittle their needs just because we personally do not share their lifestyle.

    Also, as I said repeatedly, providing extra services for those willing to pay extra (such as a private room, or a private duty nurse, or a more expensive physical environment) should not come at the expense of the other patients. That would be wrong.

    As nurses, we should be prepared to take care of all patients from all cultures and respect their cultural differences -- as long as it doesn't hurt the other patients. That's true of patients from a different country ... or from a different religion ... or a different socio-economic class.

    llg
    I'm not a nurse yet (still a student) so you can take or leave my opinion, but I agree with you llg. As long as everyone is getting (rich and poor) the best medical treatment, why can't the people who can afford the plasma tv or private room get it if they are willing to pay for it.

    If it brings in money for the hospital to improve the medical care for everyone, then I say let them do it. As a patient, I could care less if someone is getting a steak dinner while watchin cable on a plasma tv next door, as long as my medical needs are being met.

    Again this is just my opinion.

    ERin (nursing student)
  9. by   Blee O'Myacin
    But would that nice lady who can't seem to make it to the bedside commode in time insist on wearing that robe along with her girdle and pantyhose?

    I guess you can no longer say "hospitality" without "hospital". I also dislike the use of the word "client" - even in esthetics. I figure that if you are providing someone with a medical service, then they are the patient and you are the practioner. Clients make me think of stockbrokers! And I've only heard nursing school instructors and management call people "clients".

    Blee
  10. by   BBFRN
    Having worked agency on one of the units mentioned, I can say that the one I was on did not get preferential treatment in staffing per se, but they obviously had a larger budget to work with, and could afford to pay agency to keep them fully staffed at all times. I loved the patient suites, and the ability to give special treatment to the 3 Med/Surg patients I had. Gotta love that ratio!

    The patients ranged from mostly post-op plastics, to cancer patients, to doctors, nurses, or their family members. The visitor policy was very lax, and patients could come and go as they pleased- that even meant behind the nurses' station.

    It had a very peaceful atmosphere, and I really loved being able to care for the cancer patients in that type of setting. They really seemed to respond well to it.

    I thought it would be pretty annoying working on that unit until I did it. I can't say enough good things about it, really.
  11. by   dream'n
    I brought this topic up at work today, and I must say I was surprised at the even-even split of opinions from my co-workers. Everyone had an opinion (both sides) and felt very strongly about it. We had a great and respectful discussion regarding VIP units. Gave us all alot to think about, Viva la difference.
    Last edit by dream'n on Aug 29, '06
  12. by   PANurseRN1
    Quote from mommy2boys
    I'm not a nurse yet (still a student) so you can take or leave my opinion, but I agree with you llg. As long as everyone is getting (rich and poor) the best medical treatment, why can't the people who can afford the plasma tv or private room get it if they are willing to pay for it.

    If it brings in money for the hospital to improve the medical care for everyone, then I say let them do it. As a patient, I could care less if someone is getting a steak dinner while watchin cable on a plasma tv next door, as long as my medical needs are being met.

    Again this is just my opinion.

    ERin (nursing student)
    Would that this actually happened. Even non-profits are all about making even more profit.
  13. by   Pedi-ER-RN
    Nurse Erica, The Pavillion at Washington Hospital Center is very nice. I worked at WHC, but not in the Pavillion. Some of their med surg units were nice and I heard that their cardio units/cath labs and LDRP's were awsome, but this place was freakin beaautiful!!!! Plush carpet, crystal chandelliers, paintings on the walls that move to reveal oxygen or suction tubing. Each room had a small galley like kitchen with stainless steel appliances. The pts were treated to anything/everything they wanted/could afford. I took care of a pt that was transferred out of the Pavillion because of unforseen extra days needed (obviously he wasn't filthy rich). I hear alot of high profile celebs go to theses places with "exhaustion" and viral illness, etc... and get pampered. Why can't they just go to a spa and pop a Xanax or two if they are stressed out. I have mixed emotions about these units. The pts aren't hight acuity and they are well staffed. Yes, these pts might runn your butt off all shift having you do trivial stuff, but the med surg pts runn your butt off with ligit needs, ie: incontinence care, wound care, medication administration, etc.... I too have mixed feelings about these types of unit.
    Sorry for the long post

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