Do you ever correct people about medical stuff? - pg.6 | allnurses

Do you ever correct people about medical stuff? - page 6

I'm not talking about patient education, I'm just talking about general conversation. I hear people get things wrong medically all the time, but I rarely correct people. For example, a relative... Read More

  1. Visit  limaRN profile page
    1
    Quote from lindseylpn
    I have a family member that says her kids are allergic to just about everything, Benadryl, cold meds, Tylenol etc, etc because, they make them sleepy or hyper or upsets their stomachs. I've told her that side effects doesn't mean they are allergic but, she doesn't seen to comprehend. I've had several family members say crazy off the wall medical stuff and have even argued with me so, I just don't say anything anymore. One of my favorites was when someone asked me how to stop throwing up dial, and got mad and acted like I was stupid when I didn't understand. I asked "like dial soap?" and she was offended and snapped "no, from my gallbladder" lol. Oh, and the things people put on Facebook, one girl kept putting that she had to get her gold babbler taken out....
    Gold babbler... That sounds like a fun organ. I wish I had one
    OCNRN63 likes this.
  2. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    1
    Quote from mariebailey
    I totally agree. I avoid providing advice. I don't mind providing education, like the other poster stated, when people seek it out, but I see it as not in anyone's best interest to advise someone on their personal health if I'm not their provider.
    I agree. Those of us choosing to sometimes correct others about medical stuff, don't give medical advice.

    I have to admit these are funny stories you all are sharing. Funny/Scary stories.
    Altra likes this.
  3. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    2
    Quote from tokmom
    What terminology do you want them to use? I seriously don't get it. When my family says 'stomach flu' I know there is puking and or diarrhea involved.
    Stomach bug, maybe? I don't think the average person is going to say they have gastroenteritis.
    It is true that it isn't a flu, though.
    KelRN215 and nursel56 like this.
  4. Visit  RNdynamic profile page
    0
    As well, people are interpreting my comment in an unnatural way and are therefore expressing mock outrage. My statement did not state that cancer survivors have no courage, as a couple people seem to believe.

    Rather, my statement merely signifies that having cancer does not suddenly and automatically bestow courage or honor upon your personality. There are definitely cancer victims with courage out there. But Fidel Castro was reported to have had cancer before he died; however, he was far from being an honorable or courageous man.

    Also, my father's gold-digging girlfriend had breast cancer, twice, and she's still a total sack of S anyway.
    Last edit by RNdynamic on Jan 29, '13
  5. Visit  RNdynamic profile page
    0
    Fidel Castro is alive; but he was reported to have had cancer before he will die. And why would people behave that way about one illness and not cancer? It applies to any illness; it just happens that cancer is the most prominently utilized.
  6. Visit  mappers profile page
    0
    Boy, way to hijack a thread. Now a thread about what do you do when you hear people say medical things that are technically wrong has turned into and us vs. them (you) cancer thread.

    In my original post, I said the man tells everyone....I should have said he states he has.... I could have worded it better I admit, because I don't think he tells every person he happens to meet about his cancer. However, you made a pretty large leap from he tells everyone to he brags to everyone he knows about his cancer. Jumping to conclusions and leaping to assumptions is not healthy exercise.
  7. Visit  leslie :-D profile page
    2
    Quote from mappers
    I have a patient who also goes to my church. He tells everyone he has bladder cancer. He really has prostate cancer with mets to the bladder. This happens a lot with "bone" and "liver" cancer as well. I hear people say "so and so" had breast cancer and now they have "bone" cancer. Well, they most likely have bone mets, not bone cancer.
    i guess my main question would be, why does it bother you when folks misspeak?
    when i hear about someone having cancer, i don't get hung up on its semantics...
    rather, that they have ca and are fighting a horrific battle.

    also when i hear of those telling 'everyone' about their cancer, to me, it is a cry for support.
    as stated, people deal with their crises differently.
    some are private, some are extremely vocal.

    so yeah mappers, rather than wonder who tells others what, i'd be curious to know why it bothers some people when others are misinformed?

    someone having a "stomach flu" is pretty self-explanatory...regardless if it is a misnomer.
    same goes for any other ailment out there.
    if you get the gist of what they're trying to say, why sweat the small stuff?
    curious, that's all.

    leslie
    Dazglue and hiddencatRN like this.
  8. Visit  mappers profile page
    3
    Well, in the short run, it doesn't really matter, but when misinformation is out there, I think it only leads to more misinformation. If people stop getting the flu shot because they got it last year and had the stomach flu anyway, that's a problem.

    For my guy with cancer, his telling me that he had bladder cancer made me stop and question the treatment plan. I thought the treatment plan was for prostate CA and he tells me he has bladder CA. The treatment plan wasn't really what we normally do for bladder CA so I had to re-read patient hx to make sure I was doing the right thing. We were.

    Cancer is treated based on the primary cancer, so when patients start comparing their plans (and they do), I think it is important that they know what they have. So when I hear in casual conversation, that so-n-so has bone cancer and someone pipes in that their grandma had bone cancer and they had this type of treatment, they could be comparing apples and oranges. Do I question or correct them when it is a non-clinical, causal type setting? NO! It's rude and inappropriate, but I privately wonder how well they were educated about their conditions, by their providers. I then think about my practice and how well I'm educating my patients.
  9. Visit  mappers profile page
    1
    Quote from Nascar nurse
    Have been trying to tell my Mother for years that going out without a coat on is only going to give me hypothermia, not pneumonia. I've also tried to tell her that not every head cold requires an antibiotic and that OTC cold meds only provide symptom relief..they don't "cure" a cold (so no Mom, I don't need to take it a few extra days just to make sure the cold is gone!).

    I love her to death...but some issues are just banging my head into a brick wall. I figure if I can't get my own Mother to understand it's probably best to just keep my mouth shut with the rest of the world.
    What about weather? Last week, the temps around here were lows in the teens, highs in the 20's. Today, the high is supposed to be close to 70 and next week will will be normal 30s - 40s. I've heard a lot of people say, "No wonder we are all sick!"
    KaroSnowQueen likes this.
  10. Visit  RNdynamic profile page
    0
    Quote from leslie :-D
    i guess my main question would be, why does it bother you when folks misspeak?when i hear about someone having cancer, i don't get hung up on its semantics...rather, that they have ca and are fighting a horrific battle.also when i hear of those telling 'everyone' about their cancer, to me, it is a cry for support.as stated, people deal with their crises differently.some are private, some are extremely vocal.so yeah mappers, rather than wonder who tells others what, i'd be curious to know why it bothers some people when others are misinformed?someone having a "stomach flu" is pretty self-explanatory...regardless if it is a misnomer.same goes for any other ailment out there.if you get the gist of what they're trying to say, why sweat the small stuff?curious, that's all. leslie
    Not always is the gist adequately conveyed if people are using the wrong terms for certain illnesses. Years ago, AIDS was called the "gay cancer," an offensive term for a disease that is not the same as actual cancer.
  11. Visit  kool-aide, RN profile page
    2
    C'mon guys, lets get back to having fun!


    Prostrate really annoys me! Also, my grandpa thinks that every lab test requires fasting, and nobody will convince him otherwise! Haha
    AnonRNC and Hygiene Queen like this.
  12. Visit  Spidey's mom profile page
    0
    Quote from kool-aide
    C'mon guys, lets get back to having fun!


    Prostrate really annoys me! Also, my grandpa thinks that every lab test requires fasting, and nobody will convince him otherwise! Haha
    A family member thinks they will starve to death if they have to fast for a blood test first thing in the morning. Of course, I have to point out that they fast every night unless they get up to eat something and the blood test was scheduled for about the time they ate breakfast.

    Also, my grandmother always complained about how much blood the lab tech would take - not realizing it is so very small.

  13. Visit  Silverdragon102 profile page
    0
    closing for staff review due to going off topic


Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close