Do I need a BSN ??? - page 2

I will be graduating in May with my ADN, and I'm really not sure if I want to continue my education. Do I really need the bachelor degree to practice nursing at a higher level. I understand that I... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    Good post, Nightengale.:kiss
  2. by   nightingale
    We all come to nursing with different expectations and goals. Often these change as we mature and experience "the real world". I embrace each and every one of us; we all offer something unique.

    The happier I am with myself and with my path the more I can give to nursing. I am lucky to have obtained what I have. I continue to want so much more.
    Last edit by nightingale on May 8, '02
  3. by   live4today
    All I can see that a BSN would afford me right now are employment options that I cannot have without one, and for me that means it is important to return to obtain a BSN which I look forward to doing as soon as our military orders move us out of Texas (within a year). With my right arm shoulder injury, a desk job is about all I will be able to handle since lifting is out of the question. When I could work hospital nursing, all was great, but when the injury to my shoulder occurred, I quickly learned how important a BSN would have meant in my life. This may not be for everyone, and that is okay, but for me, it looks pretty darn good about now for the personal reasons I just mentioned. Ah heck, maybe I'll return to college for a totally different career field. I can't guess the future, and that's sooooo obvious since I never thought in a million days that I would be injured to the point of having to rethink my life's career choice.
  4. by   Q.
    Another suggestion which has helped me is to scan the job opportunities to see what jobs interest you, or jobs that you feel like you would like to do or could do; even if you haven't worked in the field and might have NO idea what you want, looking to see what's available is a good way to possibly gauge your future goals.

    Once you see a job that interests you, take a peek at the required qualifications to get a feel of what it may take for you to work in that role or even a role similiar.

    I scanned the job opportunities for a while and noticed that everything that even remotely appealed to me, required an MSN. Hence, that was one of the major driving forces for me to return to school. And I have to say, even if I don't end up utilizing it or become pregnant and a stay-at-home full time mom (I wish), the education I've received is lifelong and something that can never be taken away from me.
  5. by   mattsmom81
    Good input on this thread! I'll add my $0.02.

    Although you can sure be a excellant nurse with or without a degree, life has a way of throwing curveballs and roadblocks our way and it's good to think ahead, as others have so wisely posted.

    I wish in 20 20 hindsite that I would have IMMEDIATELY made it a priority to get my BSN when I was young. Even if you need to work, make a promise to yourself to get the degree soon... it's worth it...your employer will likely help with tuition reimbursment. You can do it part time through distance ed. You'll never regret the extra credential, as it will open doors for you later should you wish to move outside the bedside role, where BSN's are preferred .

    My story is similar to Renee, as at 45 YOA I never dreamed I would have a car wreck that left me unable to do bedside care, which was all I ever wanted to do too. I LOVE critical care but can't hack the physical workload.....I find it's hard to get hired anywhere else without my BSN. Now my credits are old and most would have to be totally repeated....I don't think I have the energy anymore

    So...my advice, don't limit your future opportunites! And good luck whatever you decide!
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on May 8, '02
  6. by   catlady
    I just got hired today as a nursing case manager for a major insurance company--without case management experience and *without* a BSN. I've also taught nursing, and have been a clinical manager. It can be done.

    Don't get me wrong; I'm all for college education. I only wish nursing would begin to recognize those of us with non-mainstream educations; i.e., the non-nursing college degrees.
  7. by   Q.
    Catlady:

    In your previous post you signed your name as Catlady, RN, BA, MA, CCRN.

    You don't think the BA and the MA had ANYTHING to do with your getting hired?

    Sometimes it's not the N in the BSN that matters, but the BS.

    And while I've also seen cases of people getting hired into positions that *required* a certain degree, those are few and far between. Why not increase your chances of being THE candidate to get the job? Personally, I don't like gambling with my career and hoping that someone will give me a break.
  8. by   4XNURSE
    Originally posted by tlc7116
    ...I'm really not sure if I want to continue my education. Do I really need the bachelor degree...
    Need the BS - NO!

    Continue the education - ABSOLUTELY YES!

    You won't be worth hiring, and I wouldn't want you as my nurse or as a co-worker, if you don't continue your education. This is a continuously changing field and you need to keep up. Why not work on the advanced degree as you do the learning?

    Just my $ .02.

    ken
  9. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by catlady
    I just got hired today as a nursing case manager for a major insurance company--without case management experience and *without* a BSN. I've also taught nursing, and have been a clinical manager. It can be done.

    Don't get me wrong; I'm all for college education. I only wish nursing would begin to recognize those of us with non-mainstream educations; i.e., the non-nursing college degrees.
    I am happy for you and also wish non degreed RN's would receive more recognition. However, I will continue to give the advice to young nurses that I wish I had been given 25 years ago.

    And while you have managed to move away from the bedside without a degree, the general reality is, IME, what I posted: BSN's are generally PREFERRED in roles away from the bedside. I have heard this more than once or twice, so I feel pretty secure in my opinion.
  10. by   catlady
    Originally posted by Susy K
    Catlady:

    In your previous post you signed your name as Catlady, RN, BA, MA, CCRN.

    You don't think the BA and the MA had ANYTHING to do with your getting hired?

    Sometimes it's not the N in the BSN that matters, but the BS.

    And while I've also seen cases of people getting hired into positions that *required* a certain degree, those are few and far between. Why not increase your chances of being THE candidate to get the job? Personally, I don't like gambling with my career and hoping that someone will give me a break.
    Please understand that I'm all in favor of nurses being as well-educated as possible. I do think the profession has gone off the deep end with this issue!

    I am sure that my being a college graduate did not hurt me today. I am also sure that my not having a BSN has hurt me other times. As I said, I wish the nursing profession would recognize those of us who have other degrees as being just as professional as the BSNs. I went to nursing school *after* I'd earned the other degrees, and back then there were not many options for non-nurse college graduates to get their BSNs or, gawdfabbid, MSNs, the way there are now. I have looked into some RN to MSN programs, although almost all of them make you take a ton of undergraduate courses anyway. And as a single mom who's already completed three programs, I can't justify shelling out the very high tuition these programs want when I don't have my child's future college education squared away. In this new job, I might be able to get some decent tuition reimbursement, and then I would look into going back to school. In the meantime, I do keep up on my continuing education for my CCRN--which, unlike ANCC, doesn't discriminate its certification based on nursing degrees. I believe you should take classes because you want to learn something, not because someone has held up a hoop for you to jump through.

    I jumped into this thread because I perceived a judgment that getting a BSN makes you the best you can be, as if not getting the BSN means you're something less than that. The poster has stated that she did not mean what I perceived, and I accept that. If I were a young girl who wanted to go into nursing and could afford a four-year program, I'd start with the BSN. But many people are attracted to nursing because they can do it in less than four years. I'd hate to lose even more potential nurses, but I think that's where we're heading.
  11. by   lisamcrn
    I think this topic is similar in argument to the LPN/RN debate. Everyone has choices for themselves they need to make and what works for me isn't someone elses path to follow. There are wonderful and embarassing nurses in each education level. I want my BSN for a personal goal....I believe in advanced education and want that degree. Will I use that degree....probably not. I personally have no interest at this phase in my life to hold a position requiring anything other than my ADN. But, if I do I will have an option. And the local hospital here pays a $1.00 more per hour just to have the BSN....hell, the monetary encouragement there is worth another year of school.


    Now let's just hope I blew that said hospital away with my interview yesterday and they give me a job that leads to tuition assistance that leads to my BSN that leads to more money that leads to me not working for than 36 hours a week so I can stay home more with my 5 (yes 5) children......that's what the BSN could do for me!!

  12. by   Q.
    Originally posted by catlady


    As I said, I wish the nursing profession would recognize those of us who have other degrees as being just as professional as the BSNs.
    I think that the nursing profession is striving for a bachelor's degree...period. The only reason why BSN is mentioned is because it's the degree that is associated with our profession. I could be wrong, but I don't think the argument is that BSNs are more professional than a nurse with a BA in Business, Pysch or Communication. I simply think the argument stems from having a 4 year degree.
  13. by   catlady
    Susy, you might be surprised at how much difference nursing sees between a BSN and a BA or BS. Most graduate schools, the ANCC, most places where you might want to teach, many hospitals, etc., do not recognize the BA or BS. I actually had one so-called bridge BSN program insist on my taking their freshman English class, despite my holding a master's degree in management. Needless to say, I didn't pursue that school.

    I happen to feel that a nurse with a full two or three years of nursing courses who also completed a full four years of college in another discipline is a pretty well rounded, professional person. And there are a lot of us around. Nurses like to compare themselves to lawyers and doctors. Well, lawyers and doctors can major in anything for their college degree, and then they study law and medicine. Their law studies and medical studies aren't part of their undergraduate work. Sounds like a good argument for the non-BSNs!

    So I guess I agree with you that all nurses should try to get a degree. I don't agree with those who insist it's gotta be the BSN.

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Do I need a BSN ???