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Enright

Enright

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Enright's Latest Activity

  1. Enright

    is it oriented or orientated?

    Prostrate instead of Prostate?!!!!
  2. Enright

    Chi Eta Phi?

    I only asked about the ethnic make-up of the group because there are many fine Greek organizations which are exclusive to African Americans. I thought this might be one. It wasn't clear from the web site.
  3. Enright

    Chi Eta Phi?

    I'm a member of Sigma Theta Tau which has done quite a bit to enhance my nursing career. I'm proud of the affiliation. I'd never heard of Chi Eta Phi so I looked at their web site. Although it isn't mentioned, is this a nursing society exclusively for nurses of color? That would be helpful to know.
  4. Cryssi...there are an awful lot of us later in life nurses. One of the things I suggest is that you might talk to a nearby school of nursing ...ADN or BSN... and ask for a pre-requisite list. What I did was take night classes for several years until I had the pre-req courses done. Then I started an accelerated program. I already had a degree but not much of it was useful towards nursing. A school of nursing might also be a great place to find out about all the different kinds of programs. Nursing education can be a little confusing so reading up on programs might make that clearer. One advantage to being a bit older is sometimes patients give you all kinds of benefit of the doubt even when you are brand new! Good luck in your decision.
  5. Enright

    Public/Community Health Nursing Programs

    I am a community health nurse ....I always say I have 4 million clients...I oversee health policy for all of my states licensed drivers. I had a community health rotation in my BSN program but no formal program before I got this job. These jobs tend to be government and people tend to stay in them long term. Also, a bit less well paid than hospital nursing. There are some terrific advantages...I work M-R, 4 10 hour days. And all the advantages of being a state employee (pension, benefits, etc).
  6. Enright

    Wisconsin Nurses

    I don't feel the WNA has anything to offer me except for high dues. I do get a lot from my professional organizations...ARN, Sigma Theta Tau. They also don't cost so much (all together their annual does do not add up to the high WNA fees) I know that in some states, the state RN association is also the bargaining organization for the nurse union. That isn't so here in WI. I have a union and pay them 600$ a year. I just don't see that WNA is worth the money.
  7. Enright

    State budget crisis worsens Nursing shortage

    Wisconsin state-employee nurses have not had a raise in 2 years. Now they are starting to finalize some layoffs of those who take care of our developmetnally disabled. Although few nurses will actually be laid off, those of us who remain are vastly underpaid. With our terrible budget situation, everyone is pointing fingers, esp. at state employees.
  8. Enright

    Nursing Certifications after RN

    Yes, CRRN is the cert for rehabilitation. It ends up being a love hate thing in your life....lots of care and feeding (CEUs) but it can bear fruit. I don't know if this is true for other specialties but rehab went through a crisis of membership within the last few years. They were set to require a BSN and then dropped that. They have also broadened the definition, I suspect to be inclusive of case managers and some occ health people who don't want the even bigger hassle of the COHN (Occ Health) certification!
  9. Enright

    Nursing Certifications after RN

    I'm a CRRN and have been for 11 years. The test was not easy and the requirements to document CEUs can be a pain. BUT, the CRRN has opened a lot of doors for me and has given me an employment edge at several jobs. At my most current job, I was hired out of a large pool of applicants...and I was told that certification was a main reason I was chosen. It does show employers you have taken your profession seriously and have gone beyond the minimum standard.
  10. Enright

    Do you have to be a Nurse before a NP?

    I've always found this question frightening, and I am hearing it more and more. (I believe it was asked sincerely, tho, so no flames). It is as if there is a mindset amongst the direct-to-NP crowd that registered nursing is beneath them. I find it bizarre that someone would want an advanced degree in this profession but have no interest in learning the rudimentary skills. I can tell you that there is a glut of NPs in many parts of the country and many of my NP friends have gone back to hospital staff nurse positions to make a decent wage. If they had never had that experience I wonder what they would do..... In my role as a consultant , I no longer do anything remotely like my former hospital role. But I use that clinical experience every day. And I think an NP would be much poorer for not having it.
  11. Enright

    ROLL CALL - Case Managers!!!

    I did case management (work comp) for an insurance company for 5 years and an additional few years as the RN supervisor of same. I now do case management in a community health setting for state government. I have my rehab certification (CRRN) but have never been required to have the CCM...none of my organizations ever recognized the CCM because you didn't have to be a nurse to take it.
  12. Enright

    Night shift vs. Day shift...

    I was a night shifter for all my hospital years...doing a desk RN job now. My experience was a lot different than other posters...at my central city pediatric hospital, visitors didn't start showing up until 7 pm and came and went all night. At night we had no support so the RN did all respiratory treatments (sometimes 20 or 30 aerosols a night per RN....albuterol anyone??!!). Per RN assignment is a lot higher. And we got virtually all of our admits on nights. Definitely look at the unit and its patient flow. Nights can be as fast paced as days depending on the population.
  13. Enright

    Crossing the line of professionalism

    I'd like to add another perspective....I am a government employee (RN) in a state agency. My phone rings all day long with high school and college students essentially wanting me to do their research for them on a wide range of topics (having nothing to do with my role with the agency). I am amazed at how little prep they do before they call or drop me an e-mail....and they have extremely exacting expectations (I want 1500 words from you, I need it by tomorrow, etc.). On a related topic, because I have an unusual job, I often speak to nursing school classes about my job. It is an interesting job and has great hours, weekends and holidays off, etc. I get a million requests for "how can I get a job like that?" ...I explain the process for state employment, that it is competitive, but that I'll walk anyone who is interested through it and help in any way I can. Of the 30 or 40 people who have shown enough interest to follow up, not one can get beyond the fact that a panel interview is required...they all say the same thing "hey, I'm a nurse, they should be lucky to get me!". I agree with fab4fan and llg and smilingblueyes, if people are upfront, then you can respond or not, as you wish.
  14. Enright

    sleeping staff

    Thanks, ACNORN...I was beginning to think I was alone in my outrage. I always found it hard enough, flat out running, when a patient or a parent would say "oh, did I wake you up?" when I answered a light. But other nurses indicating this is sort of ok.... I ,too, am embarrassed for the profession. I never worked a unit or a facility that didn't have something I could be doing 24/7. I was once the solo nurse on a small rehab unit....there were nights we had 1 patient who slept. I created a manual for new employees to use for our computer system. They still use it 10 years later! But sleep? Unacceptable.
  15. Enright

    its.....SNOWING!!!!!

    Our tourism industry here in Wisconsin would really appreciate it if you all could send some snow here. In my town we have not even had a half inch yet this winter. I'll never forget a Christmas vacation where DH and I drove to Phoenix through Amarillo, Texas. There was a freak ice storm in Amarillo and we were the only drivers to get through. We actually heard some local police say "well, not sure what we should do here...". There were probably a hundred cars in ditches. My yankee relatives in Georgia also verify the bread/milk/coffee/toilet paper thing.
  16. Enright

    sleeping staff

    I was a full time night nurse for 12 years, 11p to 7:30 a. I am horrified to hear that this goes on still. I always took it as a personal and professional reponsibility to get enough sleep to do my job. When I was a night manager, I fired people I found sleeping. Its a job, not an adventure. Prime problems were substance abusers, young partyers and nurse moms trying to do it all on no sleep. No excuses. Firing due to sleeping was one of the easiest employment actions to uphold. I guess what corks me off the most is that I was so busy as a night RN/charge, I had no time to pee, let alone take an hour or two for sleep. Sleepers and units that allow this give night nurses a tarnish they do not deserve. When I left clinical nursing I had a nightly patient load of 15 very sick children to medicate, do aerosols (no R/T), assess and cater to their up all night parents. I believe any RN who sleeps on his/her shift should be fired.