Discouraged: Is EVERY public USA nursing program impacted? - page 2

I'm a medical assistant with an AAS and want to pursue nursing. The RN programs where I am - CA - are so impacted it's CRAZY!!!!! The wait time for the ADN program is at least 2 yrs and that's AFTER... Read More

  1. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from LuvMyGamecocks
    I'm in an ADN program, haven't started clinicals yet. Why? The waiting list to start clinicals is....get this....

    SPRING 2010!!!

    No joke. It's really that long. The kicker? Science classes expire after 5 years.

    There is a special "Merit Admissions" program to apply for each Fall that gets funding from the state legislature to provide an extra 40 students in the next summer and 40 in the next fall. But, the school has to apply for the funding every year...it's not a guaranteed thing to count on year after year.

    So? I'm applying for Merit Admissions this Fall and to another ADN program about 45 minutes from here....with any luck, I'll be finished with school before my kindergartener is!!
    Wow. Just.....wow.
  2. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from LuvMyGamecocks
    I'm in an ADN program, haven't started clinicals yet. Why? The waiting list to start clinicals is....get this....

    SPRING 2010!!!

    No joke. It's really that long. The kicker? Science classes expire after 5 years.

    There is a special "Merit Admissions" program to apply for each Fall that gets funding from the state legislature to provide an extra 40 students in the next summer and 40 in the next fall. But, the school has to apply for the funding every year...it's not a guaranteed thing to count on year after year.

    So? I'm applying for Merit Admissions this Fall and to another ADN program about 45 minutes from here....with any luck, I'll be finished with school before my kindergartener is!!
    I don't understand, how can they have a program that doesn't have enogh spots for accepted students in clinicals?

    Peace,
    Cathie
  3. by   LuvMyGamecocks
    Quote from CuriousMe
    I don't understand, how can they have a program that doesn't have enogh spots for accepted students in clinicals?
    They have the standard starting classes in NUR 101 in Fall and Spring which admits students based on their place on the waiting list. Only 80 students per semester start clinicals like this.

    Merit Admissions is totally different. The school applies for the funding needed for extra staff, etc each year. Based on the funding they receive, they add an additional starting classes in NUR 101 (40 in summer, 40 in Fall). Applying to Merit Admissions has nothing to do with the waiting list. In fact, those far down the waiting list can apply for Merit Admission and get an earlier start date.

    Does that make sense?
  4. by   TiffyRN
    BSN will probably not take longer if there is a two year waiting list for ADN school. Wouldn't recommend the LPN/LVN route as it seems to take even longer. I wish I had gone on ahead and gotten my BSN.
  5. by   CuriousMe
    Quote from LuvMyGamecocks
    They have the standard starting classes in NUR 101 in Fall and Spring which admits students based on their place on the waiting list. Only 80 students per semester start clinicals like this.

    Merit Admissions is totally different. The school applies for the funding needed for extra staff, etc each year. Based on the funding they receive, they add an additional starting classes in NUR 101 (40 in summer, 40 in Fall). Applying to Merit Admissions has nothing to do with the waiting list. In fact, those far down the waiting list can apply for Merit Admission and get an earlier start date.

    Does that make sense?
    So basically, you're not in the program until you're accepted into Clinicals?

    What school/state is this in?

    Peace,
    Cathie
  6. by   jjg003
    I was in a Associate Degree plan for nursing but I have now transferred into a BSN program. The reason I did that was I already had all my prereqs and it was only one more semester more for me to get my BSN instead of my associate degree. Both programs are very competitive but they don't have wait lists but you are up against 200-250 people for 50 spots. My old school choose people by the Pre NCLEX test and my new school go all by GPA. GOOD LUCK and don't give up hope!

    JJ
  7. by   ArtsyIndi
    Look into a rurally based program. Lower population counties typically have several hospitals spread out over several counties in which they place their clinicals. For instance: Tarleton State University in Stephenville TX. Once done with pre-reqs, or on your completing semester, you are in the Nursing Survey class,a pool from which they take their Foundations class. At that point you're in. No wait. The only hold up is your not fulfilling requirements. They take in 64 students per semester and I feel sure there are other rural programs out there where the push to enter isn't quite so bad. Good luck!
  8. by   MedSurgeMess
    We tend to blame only the schools for the shortfall of available seats in a program or clinicals. It's my understanding that in my state that a facility (hospital, ltc, etc) can only have x amount of students on their grounds per number of registered beds per semester at any given time due to liability reasons. If there is more than 1 school in the area and limited facilities, each school is really limited, and each class (freshman, sophomore, etc) is even more so! Maybe it's this way all the way around? Just a thought since I don't know how it is everywhere. This is an unfortunate circumstance but totally understandable from a facility standpoint.....
  9. by   cad4296
    Quote from Jules A
    I agree 100% and wouldn't take a class over for a B that is for sure. Around here the universities are actually easier to get into for the BSN than the community colleges so if you can't get into a community college you may want to look into a 4 year program. Even though it would cost more and take longer if it is your only option I would consider it. The only other thing that you might want to think about is lightening your load. Sheesh 5 courses would have me in Bs and Cs for sure! If you are only taking 1 to 2 prereqs each semester I'd bet you'll have that A average. Good luck, Jules
    Yes I am applying to the BSN program. I'm currently at a CC but this semester I will be completing the last of the required core curriculum as well as all the BSN pre-reqs. I actually have enough credits to apply for an Associates of Science at this point. With all these classes done it would actually be shorter for me to get my RN from the BSN program. The BSN program is 5 semesters long while the ASN program is 6! The BSN program requires all non nursing courses to be completed prior but the ASN actually has some of the non nursing classes in it's "recommended schedule of classes" like microbiology and such. I've already taken all those so that would mean I would have 2 classes per semester and of course nursing all builds ontop of each class so you can't take more if you have a lighter courseload like me. Still takes you 6 full semesters to graduate. I could probably make all A's taking 1-2 classes per semester, but I really don't want to be in school forever and with the cost of living rising faster than my annual 3% payraise, I really can't afford to be in school forever. :uhoh21: I just hope the BSN school takes my full time work/school commitment into consideration and realize I do work hard even if I don't get straight A's and I could possibly be a 4.0 student if I didn't NEED to work! If not, I already have a spot in the ASN program for next fall, but I'd much rather go for the BSN since I want to persue a master's.

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