Covert Pelvic Exams??! - page 5

I can't find a link to the story, but read in my local paper today that some medical schools have decided to stop allowing 2 to 4 medical students do pelvic exams on female patients who are... Read More

  1. by   MishlB
    Originally posted by EmeraldNYL
    Yikes..... I know my fiance's med school hires an ex-prostitute so they can learn how to do pelvic exams.
    Umm, this sounds a little more unethical than medical students examining under anesthesia. Maybe I am not understanding, exactly whay kind of examining was being done? Was it prior to a specific surgery? Surely it wasn't sexual in nature, but an opportunity to learn, right?? (NOT SAYING I AGREE, just wondering about the details)
    I sure would LOVE to see the "Vulva Puppet Show" though!!What I REALLY want to know is...what does Heather get when she reaches the 10,000 post mark?? (can you make a vulva cake, Heather??)
    Last edit by MishlB on Mar 14, '03
  2. by   sunnygirl272
    MishlB,
    i would think it was done as they need to practice and learn on someone..and why not use someone who is used to lotsa traffic in that area?
  3. by   MishlB
    Originally posted by sunnygirl272
    MishlB,
    i would think it was done as they need to practice and learn on someone..and why not use someone who is used to lotsa traffic in that area?
    I guess. I'm sure she got paid well for a days work. Makes you wonder how they hired her..."Hey guys, I know this girl who is willing to let us examine her, for a nominal fee of course."
  4. by   mark_LD_RN
    Originally posted by RN2B4SUR
    mark_LD_RN, Thanks for your insight. I do have to say that though my short time of training so far, and being the only guy in school right now, I have been treated equal. There are just situations like this that have me curious of how to handle it.

    Is the open environment the same for a M. nurse on the OB/GYN floor in real life after school? I would think more pts would be offended more then I would be helping them. Is this true from anyone else's point of view?
    RN2B4SUR you need to lose the double standard and that way of thinking. I can promise you my patients are not offended by me. not even the ones that choose to go to female docs or midwives. I have patients that come to deliver at my hospital just because of me. I am requested by many and refered by almost all my patients. and i have many cards and letters to prove it. yes there is the cultural thing we have had 2 muslim patients and no males were allowed in and other than that only 2 times has a patient ever request i not be their nurse.

    and i have to agree with eltrip why should it matter,males are just as much a nurse as a female. no one thinks twice about a male ob doc explain the difference . other than just old time thinking of men are doctors and females are nurses. can you remember back when any man being a nurse was thought to be something wrong with them ie gay or crazy?

    the old way of thinking is out and it needs to be long gone. it is just as appropriate for a male nurse(there is that hated term"male nurse" to care for a female patient as it is for a female nurse to care for a male patient.


    oh and as far as offending the patient . it is all in how you present yourself. be confident and professional at all times and they will not be offended. even the little ole ladies like me when i work medical tele and icu. you may be amazed at how the female patients will accept you if you present yourself right. and don't forget to be caring and compassionate.. anyday you would like to witness what i said here first hand let me know and i will arrange for you to spend the day following me around if you can make it to my area. good luck RN2B4SUR, you may need it.
    Last edit by mark_LD_RN on Mar 15, '03
  5. by   sixes
    Personally I don't care if my learning person( for lack of a better expression) is male or female or a little of both.
    When my OBY/GYN asked if a few of his students could examine me because I was having a transverse labor and I agreed I though a few meant 2or 3 not 10. I mean holy cow.
    Labor and delivery are painful enough never mind when you are having a difficult one.
    I had the MD trying to turn the baby and residents trying to feel the position.
    They were all very understanding when I said enough.
    I am all for teaching hospitals and understand the learning process.
    Where would I be if my client whom I gave my first IM injection on said no?
    I informed ever client I had that this was my first time too-----.and would they mind.:imbar
  6. by   Zee_RN
    Regarding my surgery and resulting infertility: I didn't deal well with it for several years. I got bad legal advice too, go figure. I was young and stupid and there were no medical people in my family for me to turn to. No lawyers, either, for that matter. A friend gave me the name of a legal firm; I went to them and they said, "well, there's nothing really you can do...our sympathies, the guy's a jerk but hey..." Found out years later that the legal firm represented the hospital. *smacks head* I was sooo young. Sooo stupid. This was....ummmm, 1978 that I had the surgery. 1979 I found out I had no fallopian tubes.

    Fast forward to 1989: in vitro fertilization. First time success. Triplet daughters. Whom I'd have never had if those jerks hadn't removed my fallopian tubes. God works in mysterious ways.
  7. by   emily_mom
    Originally posted by Zee_RN
    Regarding my surgery and resulting infertility: I didn't deal well with it for several years. I got bad legal advice too, go figure. I was young and stupid and there were no medical people in my family for me to turn to. No lawyers, either, for that matter. A friend gave me the name of a legal firm; I went to them and they said, "well, there's nothing really you can do...our sympathies, the guy's a jerk but hey..." Found out years later that the legal firm represented the hospital. *smacks head* I was sooo young. Sooo stupid. This was....ummmm, 1978 that I had the surgery. 1979 I found out I had no fallopian tubes.

    Fast forward to 1989: in vitro fertilization. First time success. Triplet daughters. Whom I'd have never had if those jerks hadn't removed my fallopian tubes. God works in mysterious ways.
    Wouldn't that have been a conflict of interest for the law firm? I would think you could countersue on that fact, but I'm sure the statute of limitations is long gone.

    TRIPLETS??? Wow! ALL GIRLS!!! Triple wowsie! So, what is life like with 3 teenagers?? :kiss
  8. by   Dayray
    Sorry guys cant help it have to respond =)


    RN2B4SURE
    Both Mark and I work L&D and both happen to be men we love our jobs and our patients love us. True males are not common in L&D but the misconception is that this is becuse patients dont want them there when really it is becuse they are either blocked or chased off by other nurses. I'll spare the rest of the board (who are so sick of hearing me talk about this) and just say if you want to hear more about the subject PM me. Ill be happy to answer any questions you have
  9. by   mark_LD_RN
    well said dayray, glad to see you posting more often.hope things are going well for you

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