Complete and total disregard for Visiting Hours! (vent) - page 3

Ok - Does any else have this problem? Visitors who think that visiting hours don't apply to them! They seem to think that when the announcement is made that visiting hours are over, it doesn't apply... Read More

  1. by   crissrn27
    My sis broke her tib/fib last year and had to have a ORIF. She was in extreme pain afterward and I had to throw a freakin' fit to get the doc in there to eval (jerk doc, nurses were OK). He wanted to do po percs and she needed IV diluadid. He finally called the hospitalist in to "deal" with it. Thank goodness, I had actually suggested a epidural, lol!! The nurses were very busy and really didn't know what to do for my sis screaming in pain, and probably didn't want to deal with the jerk doc. (Not saying that I would be any better with 10 pts).

    So I told you all of that to tell you this. NO WAY was I leaving her! The nurse came in exactly twice during the 11-7 shift, again, if I had 10 post-ops I probably couldn't do much better. But when they "suggested" at 2100 I go home for the night I just laughed. Yeah right. I did bedpan duty, I changed sheets, etc, ect. The only thing they did was give meds.......no assessments, nothing. I got ice packs for leg, helped next day with walker. They just didn't have the time, do you guys?

    All that being said, if 5 people are in there with there shoes off their stinky feet being loud that is one thing, but if someones husband wants to stay with their wife I don't see anything wrong with this. As long as he is quiet and respectful of the other pt in the room I don't think it is our place to say he must go. They might have never spent a night apart, and I don't want to be the one that separates them for no reason, other than "policy".

    I know my dad, after his MI, would have been much better off in the ICU with my mom with him all night. He was very scared and nervous and all he wanted was mom. They weren't letting her in until morning........and he suffered all night because of this "policy". He didn't let her out of his sight for weeks after! I think it should be a case by case deal, IMO.
  2. by   EmerNurse
    In my ER, visitors is up to the nurse for that patient, and the nurse is backed up! What a nice change that is for me.

    In my old job, there were *technically* visiting hours, but they weren't enforced if anyone made a peep about them. To the point where one guy rented a specific recliner (apolstered no less... ewww) to be brought in for himself (and mom during the day) for the entire stay (this was an LTAC). When visitors were quiet and helpful, they really weren't a problem. But, when the visitor is at the desk every 15 minutes with "mom wants a sip of water", "mom needs a bedpan", "mom needs new sheets, hers are wrinkled", "mom doesn't want puree food" (asp pneum), "when do I get my tray?" etc, your head can explode. Multiply this visitor by one or two of them for EACH of your patients, and you'll go insane. I couldn't STAND hearing "it's what YOU get paid for". Um.. yeah.. but I do not get paid to put up with your attitude, thank you.

    Administration wanted to please everyone BUT the staff. WE would get in trouble if we asked for privacy while we changed a vented patient's bed and the roommate had 15 visitors! Not to mention safety issues with one patient vented and out of it, with no visitors ever, and the roomie with 20 poeple in and out of the room.

    It was horrible. I'm ALL FOR visiting hours, as a general rule. Sure there are exceptions (dying pt, peds), but if you're gonna be obnoxious, in the way, and completely unhelpful, you need to leave. I am not YOUR waitress. That's not lack of holism, that's common sense.

    I love ER.
  3. by   BULLYDAWGRN
    Again I'd like to clarrify my stance on this open door visitation stuff, as far as the floors I don't care, But with ICUs and Er is concerned time visitation policy is the best for the nurse and the patient (in my view). Nothing pisses a nurse off than having to deal with a bunch of idiot families and 2nd cousins twice removed, and be turned into a handmaiden to them, having a irritated pissed off nurse is not good for the patient, so eliminate the irritation, KEEP THE DAMN DOOR LOCKED..
  4. by   NurseyBaby'05
    Quote from BULLYDAWGRN
    Again I'd like to clarrify my stance on this open door visitation stuff, as far as the floors I don't care, But with ICUs and Er is concerned time visitation policy is the best for the nurse and the patient (in my view). Nothing pisses a nurse off than having to deal with a bunch of idiot families and 2nd cousins twice removed, and be turned into a handmaiden to them, having a irritated pissed off nurse is not good for the patient, so eliminate the irritation, KEEP THE DAMN DOOR LOCKED..
    So why is it okay on regular floors to have open visitation? Instead of dealing with "idiot families" of 1-2 patients, they are dealing with 6-10 "idiot families". Do you think that doesn't piss off the floor nurses too? If families are willing to respect patients privacy, the staff's time and be respectful in general, visitation shouldn't be a problem anywhere in the hospital. The problem is that most people aren't and most management doesn't allow this to be addressed and corrected. Just my .02.
  5. by   HappyNurse2005
    being in labor and delivery,the visiting policy is a little more lax. hard to say "sorry, you gotta leave at 8pm" when people are admitted all hours of the day, babies are born at all hours, etc.

    generally, i say if you are in labor, you can have everyone and their brother visiting you. when you are delivering, you can have 2 (maybe 3) people in the room.(though once, i did have 6 or so visitors in during delivery, but they all sat on the very large windowsill and therefore were not in the way). its a wonderful event that happens only a few times ever in a woman's life and if she wants to share it with several people, that is her business.

    though-
    do not wait in the hallway! irritating b/c the OR is at the end of the hallway and if you have to run down the hall with a bed, you dont want 8 people in the way. if she's getting a 2 min cervical check, sure, wait in the hall. but, if its epidural time (20 mins), or delivery time, go to the waiting room! and don't come back until you are called-its most irritating when they are sent to the waiting room while the lady pushes,and then, b/c pushing can take 1-3 hours (or more), they wander down after a while and ask how she's doing, etc etc. trust me-they will call you when you can come back in.
  6. by   Pepper The Cat
    Another beef - people who bring in young children. Keep them at home! Don't expose them to all the germs etc in a hospital. We had someone come in with very young baby (less them 6 months old) approx 2 weeks after we had just reopened to visitors after SARS. (for you who didn't go through that, most Toronto and area closed down completely to visitors at one point). She wanted him to "see" his grandfather. Grandfather was in with a knee replacement! Hardly life threatening and hardly worth risking exposing your young child to something.
    Children under 12 aren't supposed to visit but people ignore that rule too!
  7. by   Patient
    Quote from ShayRN
    Are you serious? I just cannot believe that a NURSE would smoke weed at the hospital with a patient and the family
    Yes, I am deadly serious. Of course, this was back in the Dark Ages in 1981, but at a very well-respected, large teaching hospital. I still remember the nurse looking me in the eye saying, "I just got to RELAX in this place you know. I can't get through a day without this stuff." Puff puff pass it on...

    I had no self-esteem or any kind of backbone back then, had never had any kind of medical problem in my life, and was scared to death that if I said something, she would someway retaliate in my care. I was one dumb teenager.

    My roommate was the worst drug seeker I've ever seen in my life, and I didn't even know there was such a name for that behavior back then. She had been in a minor MVA, and screamed bloody murder in front of the docs that she was dying in pain. The docs believed her, were very sympathetic, and trying to figure out why she had this horrible pain. Lord only knows what kind of pain meds they gave her, but she always had to have more. As soon as the docs would leave, off came the c-collar, and she was partying with her brother. She even diverted some of her po meds to share with him.

    Sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread - just to illustrate a problem with visitors that probably doesn't get much consideration because who would ever believe it could happen? Yes, I really was assaulted as a patient, in broad daylight and during visiting hours that were strictly enforced. Nobody was around to witness the event except the perp's sister, who was drugged out of her mind. How much easier is it for this type of thing to happen now with multiple visitors per patient at all hours of the day and night?
  8. by   General E. Speaking, RN
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    So why is it okay on regular floors to have open visitation? Instead of dealing with "idiot families" of 1-2 patients, they are dealing with 6-10 "idiot families". Do you think that doesn't piss off the floor nurses too? If families are willing to respect patients privacy, the staff's time and be respectful in general, visitation shouldn't be a problem anywhere in the hospital. The problem is that most people aren't and most management doesn't allow this to be addressed and corrected. Just my .02.
    :yeahthat:
  9. by   nuangel1
    Quote from dream'n
    I feel strongly about this. Unless the patient is dying, the room is private, or the patient is under-age, no one should be overnighting. I've been a patient in a hospital, and received private care while in a room with another patient and their WHOLE *******' family. It is absolutely inappropriate. Want to discuss your personal medical-social issues, while half naked in a hospital gown... with a social hour going on right behind the curtain? And it is not up to the roommate to request the removal of visitors after hours.
    couldn't agree more .there is no need for family to stay all night unless peds or critical.and only if private room.i was pt in semiprivate room several times and have had issues with visitors.in 1 case i almost signed out ama .it took the supervisor and putting me in a new room for me to stay .if i am sick enough to be in the hospital i deserve to have privacy form disrepectful visitors.
  10. by   EarthChild1130
    I work a medical floor right now, and while most folks are generally okay, we get the occasional PITA family member...I'm gone by the time visiting hours are over so I don't have to deal with that, but I have seen some families stay ALL DAY long every day...if I were the patient I'd be exhausted!

    I sure do miss working the psych unit...VERY specific visiting hours...one hour, twice a day...no kids under 16, and you get ONE HOUR...after that you gotta go! Floating back there is such a joy...
  11. by   BULLYDAWGRN
    Quote from NurseyBaby'05
    So why is it okay on regular floors to have open visitation? Instead of dealing with "idiot families" of 1-2 patients, they are dealing with 6-10 "idiot families". Do you think that doesn't piss off the floor nurses too? If families are willing to respect patients privacy, the staff's time and be respectful in general, visitation shouldn't be a problem anywhere in the hospital. The problem is that most people aren't and most management doesn't allow this to be addressed and corrected. Just my .02.
    It's ok with me cause I don't work med/surge floors and ya'll can do whatever you want to do as far a visitation. I just know in the units I work at and with most critical care nurses in general prefer closed units compared to open door units. As far as idiot families go, I suggest deal with them best you can, I just lock the door on them.
  12. by   sheilagh
    I agree visiting hours on a non-critical unit with shared rooms is needed, as certain care i always try to plan during times when privacy is a little more assured...bath,extensive dressing changes,etc. But I do remember one case when no one on the floor had the heart to make this 1 husband leave, and we actually rearranged rooms so he and his wife had a private and he could stay,she was 98 and he was 99 and they had been married 70 years and had NEVER spent a night apart!!! So yes, we did bend some rules to accomadate them as I was honestly concerned that having them spend the night apart was more then they or their hearts could handle....she was in for observation having had some palpatations and dizziness....ain't love grand???:1luvu:
  13. by   shanyone
    You all have just opened my eyes to what sounds like a mess (sometimes). I am just a student and I don't start clinicals until August so I've not witnessed visitors in my area yet, but from the sounds of it, it won't always be pretty.

    I just can't imagine behaving this way in the hospital. I've been a visitor before and I wouldn't even fathom asking for blankets or food! What do these people think?? Why do we accomodate these requests for the visitors? When my family members visited my mother and got hungry, we went to the cafeteria or vending machines. Why should anyone cater to us, we are not the patient! What makes these folks think that they should be waited on if they aren't the patient? And WHY do we cater to them and perpetuate the idea that this is how they'll be treated in the hospital as a guest? It's one thing to cater to the patient, they are stuck there in the bed and can't just get up and get their own snack or whatever, but why are we catering to families? They have legs...go get your own snack or jacket if you are cold or whatever.

    The thought of catering to visitors makes me angry. Doesn't that cost the hospital money that they don't recoup from insurance? Wouldn't that be a great way to save money? It just seems so unnecessary and telling a visitor that they must get their own comfort measures seems like a logical, easy fix to this problem. What administrator in their right mind would discipline a nurse for telling a visitor where they can get what they need, rather than providing it for them? I can understand not being rude and giving good "customer service", but this is overboard and it sounds like something I'll be frustrated about when I start working some day.

    Shanyone

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