Career alternatives to traditional nursing? | allnurses

Career alternatives to traditional nursing?

  1. 0 Hi! I am a ASN registered nurse with 10+ years experience, mostly in OB. Have also functioned as a school nurse for 1 year.

    My question is this: Anyone ever do anything different after being a bedside nurse? I'm just kind of antzy lately. It's unlike me. I've worked at the same place for 14 years, so I'm not the type to skip around to a lot of different jobs. I'm not sure what I'm looking for. I'd really like to find a "9-5, Monday-Friday" kind of job. Some of my thoughts have been pharmaceutical sales, telephone triage, training staff with new medical equipment, sales rep??

    Surely I'm not the first to go through this!? I kind of feel like I'm having a midlife career crisis!
    I've even been considering furthering my education, but I'm just not sure...
    Any thoughts?? Anyone have any experience with the types of jobs I mentioned above?
    Thank you !!
  2. Visit  mommy2boysaz profile page

    About mommy2boysaz

    mommy2boysaz has '10' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'OB'. From 'OH'; Joined Mar '07; Posts: 287; Likes: 111.

    22 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  mommy2boysaz profile page
    0
    Yikes!! I just read part of an old thread on pharmaceutical sales reps ! Never mind that option!!
  4. Visit  Pumpkin1621 profile page
    0
    Have you ever thought about being a NP in OB/GYN? I am not a nurse but I just had my yearly visit and I was seen by a NP. I didn't see a doctor at all. I thought that was very neat. I personally think this is your best bet, because you mentioned that you don't usually get antzy like this. This way you will work in a field you are familiar with, but will be able to further your education and career.

    Some nurses go on to PA school, MD school, etc. You might need to take more science classes if you choose to go that route.
  5. Visit  kitty=^..^=cat profile page
    0
    If you're near Nashville, I know of a great job in the quality management department of a hospital that's "big and good"...

    They need someone to do OB chart reviews, provide inservice education to the staff in Women's Services and liason with the OB/GYN physicians.
  6. Visit  ZootRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Pumpkin1621
    Have you ever thought about being a NP in OB/GYN? I am not a nurse but I just had my yearly visit and I was seen by a NP. I didn't see a doctor at all. I thought that was very neat. I personally think this is your best bet, because you mentioned that you don't usually get antzy like this. This way you will work in a field you are familiar with, but will be able to further your education and career.

    Some nurses go on to PA school, MD school, etc. You might need to take more science classes if you choose to go that route.
    Just a thought of going to med school for 4 years, and than 2 more years of residency makes me nauseous.
    There are might be a better jobs in nursing, but I just don't see them. Sales rep that was doing inservice in our unit, said she paid ok but has to travel a lot.
  7. Visit  mommy2boysaz profile page
    0
    Hi! You know, the NP thing might be a possibility. I do love OB/GYN and this might be a good way to stay in it, but be doing something different, too. I really am not familiar with NP's in this field, though. Where I am, I know some NP's in family practice offices and I work with 2 CNM's in our OB/GYN office, but not NP's. I considered the CNM path, but I have a young family and don't want to be on call 24/7 and attending deliveries all night long. Anyone know how far beyond my master's degree I'd have to go to become a NP?

    How I wish I lived near Nashville!! The job you described sounds great to me! I'm in the OH,MI,IN corner of the world!
  8. Visit  Quickbeam profile page
    0
    I'm a Monday through Thursday, full time community health nurse. I work 4 ten hour days, no evenings, weekends or holidays (unless I want to). There are other roles like this out there. Mine required a BSN minimum and an odd lot of prior experience but the qualifications will vary. Good luck to you.
  9. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    An NP (or CNM another midlevel provider) require a masters degree and passage of a national certification test. You can usually get an MSN in 2-3 years. Good luck.
  10. Visit  ORSmurf profile page
    0
    Have you thought about doing something completely different? How about working at a surgery center? I work in the OR at a free standing surgery center and the hours are fantastic - no nights, holidays or weekends You could work pre or post op. Just another option to think about.
  11. Visit  cappuccino profile page
    0
    What about home care? The kind that is affiliated with a hospital not an agency. Alot of senior nurses have been going into that dept and love it.
  12. Visit  lionfish profile page
    0
    Have you thought about Public Health. I work monday-friday no weekends or holidays. Only once since I started have we had to rotate taking a weekend due to a very detailed dressing change that had to be done by us due to no family support to do it when we were off, but that only last for a month and there were 3 of taking turns. Not sure about other Public Health offices but we have nurses that just do MCH (maternal/child health)
  13. Visit  mommy2boysaz profile page
    0
    These are all some very interesting ideas!
    I wouldn't rule any of them out!
    What exactly does a community health nurse do? Is it the same thing as a public health nurse? Are you employed by your city or county? How is the pay, compared to hospital pay?
    The surgery center thing also sounds like an interesting option. How is the pay/benefits at a job like that?

    Thanks in advance for all the answers to my questions!!
  14. Visit  pkapple profile page
    0
    Mommy2-there are probably a kazillion jobs that would fit the bill! Have you looked into your county health dept, planned parenthood type places, ob docs offices-most of these pay a bit less, but benefits could be better.
    How about management or education department right in your current hospital-might require a higher degree, but usually M-F jobs. Employee health, school nursing, some exclusive private care for a rich lady going to
    europe---oh not that one, lol!
    Seriously, look into jobs you are qualified for or can easily work into, if the M-F shift is what you need, look for oppurtunities all around your community. If a more advanced level of practice is what you are after, go for it...just remeber a lot of midlevels do take call, especially in OB field.
    My DH is now a PA-c, he loves it, but in this small town, he is on call virtually 24/7, and makes hospital rounds after work and on weekends!
    Good Luck--you will find the perfect spot for yourself, give it some thought and try on some new jobs.


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