Call to organ donation center post pt death - page 3

by LogCabinMom

Hi there - I'm questioning a policy my hospital has and am wondering what other hospitals do. I have not encountered this at other hospitals mainly because they've been larger, and have had "death coordinators" to do this, so I... Read More


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    If I were that family, I might not react well at all! NO is NO! One more word out of their mouths and I assure you they would not be happy.
    Quote from netglow
    I asked that. No they still approach. They have info on various religions too and still will pursue the family with specific strategy. They might change who takes that case based on that. Now of course, if things get really crazy then they back off finally and lose the case, of course.
    LogCabinMom likes this.
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    Quote from morte
    If I were that family, I might not react well at all! NO is NO! One more word out of their mouths and I assure you they would not be happy.
    Agreed Morte - Needless to say I didn't take the job! They interview you with behavioral role-play questions. You are told people will be very angry with you and you need to have a thick skin, and then have a role-play scenario where you have to show how you would overcome that and be able to be persuasive. Then also explain a situation where you still, even after a rough conversation, got someone to buy in to what you were selling or to let you do your job, etc. It's a one time deal you see, you only have to get them to consent once. You won't be dealing with them again, so it's not a long term relationship you need with them. It's a sales job, if you are familiar with that kind of job, it's just a difficult one, for sure, and I think they also interview pharm reps who have science degrees so they can pickup the data-mining aspect easily - but they can't drop off a levitra pen or bring lunch from the Olive Garden to help make the sale <---- bad joke, .
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    I have sat in on many organ doantion discussions and have found the reps from GOL to be very compassionate. All they have to hear is NO from the family and they stop. Thank them for hearing what they have to say ask if there is anyting they can do for them and leave. I have seen family agree and family refuse immediately.
    Altra likes this.
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    Quote from imintrouble
    Back to the thread

    Small hospital here too. We have to call the donor number following every death. Last call I made was VERY lengthy. I'd never had anybody ask me that many detailed questions. Lab, VS, and Xray reports.
    What made me angry was that both admitting diagnoses made the deceased ineligible for donation. All donation. I found that out after about 30 minutes of detailed questions. I couldn't for the life of me figure out why we had to dance the dance, when the answer to the first question eliminated my pt as a donor. I understand completely about protocol, but yikes! Let's be reasonable.

    Yea. That's kind of ridiculous. Meanwhile, you are getting another admission, and your other patient is on the brink of coding. Really. For heaven's sake, can't they take a fax on this?
    LogCabinMom, anotherone, and barbyann like this.
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    Quote from WeepingAngel
    I've called NEOB twice and I was only on the phone for a couple of minutes.

    Experiences will vary, as was mentioned by the responder and others. I certainly am not going to put another patient in jeopardy by being on the phone with one of these folks for 45 minutes. The process should be streamlined, period.
    LogCabinMom, anotherone, nrsang97, and 2 others like this.
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    If people are too pushy about this kind of thing, and I am for organ donation, family members need to have their lawyers on speed dial.

    There is no easy way to deal with this, but common sense is a good place to start.
    barbyann likes this.
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    I think the first time was my first patient death, ever, and the patient had died from metastatic cancer. As soon as I told them that they were like oh ok thank you for your time! The second time I forget the specifics but they weren't interested then either. I'm sure if the person was a potential donor they'd have all kinds of questions.
    nrsang97 likes this.
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    The ones I have had to call about are always extreme prematurity deaths....never takes long, and they're obviously not candidates for donation. I'm talking 17, 18-weekers born alive and live for a few minutes/hours.
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    Quote from WeepingAngel
    I've called NEOB twice and I was only on the phone for a couple of minutes.
    It really depends and if they got a new coordinator on the phone they don't go straight to the point or they go to the point and keep going. It is always helpful to have your facility have a worksheet so you can have all the information available and streamlined.
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    Quote from Elvish
    The ones I have had to call about are always extreme prematurity deaths....never takes long, and they're obviously not candidates for donation. I'm talking 17, 18-weekers born alive and live for a few minutes/hours.
    We had to call for those, and also for IUFDs. Those were always interesting. "No, I don't know when the patient died, but he was born today." It was never more than a few minutes, but very weird when I first started doing it. I like the idea that it's taken out of the nurses' hands. You don't have to hope that a nurse is persuasive, approves of donation, has a good relationship with the family, etc.


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