bumex vs lasix

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    Does anyone know what the difference between bumex and lasix is?
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  3. 8 Comments so far...

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    Bumex and lasix are both loop-diuretics. I've seen patients with kidney failure that don't respond to lasix respond nicely to bumex. The kidney docs in my area seem to like bumex better. We run bumex gtts a lot.
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    I thought diuretics are contraindicated in kidney insufficiency. In school, the teachers said, if your patients aren't peeing, than don't give them diuretics. In my research it kept on showing that it's used to treat kidney disease. So I guess I'm a bit confused...
    manncer likes this.
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    OP, there's a lot of reasons. I find that if I am needing an explanation, I can go back to my physiology stuff. It's all there.
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    Hi there, I am a student nurse and this subject came up this past Friday. It was explained that Bumex was given when high doses of Furosemide were not working.
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    Loop diuretics are given to decrease fluid overload with malfunctioning kidneys and to prevent hyperkalemia. Eventually loops become less and less effective and doses of lasix can be 600mg/day or higher.
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    Bumex will make a rock urinate when lasix won't. =)
    CrufflerJJ likes this.
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    When we were discussing kidney failure for our last test, one of our instructors told us they give Lasix and Bumex together because the Bumex makes the Lasix work better.
  11. 0
    Quote from iluvnoodles
    I thought diuretics are contraindicated in kidney insufficiency. In school, the teachers said, if your patients aren't peeing, than don't give them diuretics. In my research it kept on showing that it's used to treat kidney disease. So I guess I'm a bit confused...
    One important thing to remember about school: they are covering generalizations...when you get into practice, you may find out your school lectures weren't always right on for the specific population you are seeing.

    You aren't using diuretics to treat the kidney disease, you're using it to compensate for the renal insufficiency. Case in point, dealing with heart failure and renal insufficiency, the kidney's can't cause enough diuresis on their own, you give them diuretics to treat the heart failure. You need to get that fluid off in an acute flare-up and need to keep it off in chronic management. So you increase the renal sufficiency by adding the diuretic.

    You need to look at the overall process you're dealing with. You're not going to just deal with one system here, you're dealing with the whole body. So you're going to monitor kidney function (in the example cited) to deal with the heart failure. The kidney's are only going to let you diurese to a point....then you run the risk of kidney failure. This is definitely an area where clinician skill comes into play. You know your patients, you know how far you can push things. Make sense?
    Last edit by highlandlass1592 on Mar 6, '10 : Reason: spelling


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