BSN vs. ADN - page 2

I am a BSN and I feel that I should be paid more for my extra education. What do you think?... Read More

  1. by   iodine
    Originally posted by Kyshine1:
    I have an ADN. I went to nursing school late in life and am not going to go back to school at this time of my life. It took me three and a half years to get what I have.
    Even so, I have strong opinions about ADN vs. BSN.
    Nursing is a profession. We want respect from doctors and society. But as far as I know there aren't many other professions that do not have a 4 year degree. When I graduated in 1980, it was going to be the entrance requirement. Here it is 20 years later and nothing has changed. I still believe in a BSN as the entrance requirement. All of us with lesser degrees should be grandfathered in but on a certain date it should be BSN or nothing!
    from Iodine: I graduated in 1964 and the threat of all BSN had been around for years!!! The ANA , etc, has come no further with that than several other topics in ALL this time.



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    iodine
  2. by   Laura P
    Originally posted by Kyshine1:
    I have an ADN. I went to nursing school late in life and am not going to go back to school at this time of my life. It took me three and a half years to get what I have.
    Even so, I have strong opinions about ADN vs. BSN.
    Nursing is a profession. We want respect from doctors and society. But as far as I know there aren't many other professions that do not have a 4 year degree. When I graduated in 1980, it was going to be the entrance requirement. Here it is 20 years later and nothing has changed. I still believe in a BSN as the entrance requirement. All of us with lesser degrees should be grandfathered in but on a certain date it should be BSN or nothing!
    Kyshine1,

    I wonder if your response would still be the same if you could not conveniently be "grandfathered" in ?

    I chose the ADN route and will decide later if I want to continue for my BSN, depending on many factors, family,time, money.
  3. by   Julie, RN
    Ok everyone....I know this can be a heated topic in our profession. So I am going to try and state my personal thoughts carefully...
    I DON'T THINK THE DEBATE OVER "ADN-vs-BSN" IS ABOUT WHO OR WHAT MAKES A BETTER NURSE. I think the basic core of this argument is how to ADVANCE OUR PROFESSION-and thats it. It's not to say that "this kind of nurse makes a better nurse over that kind of nurse...", it's just that our society places a high value on EDUCATION. Now, whether this is wrong or right-I'm not going to debate that, but this just seems to be the trend. For example, the Military and VA hospitals now require BSN as an entry level (unless you are an ADN with another 4-year degree, or an Army LPN).
    This is just my 2 cents....



    [This message has been edited by Julie,SN (edited June 23, 2000).]
  4. by   Mijourney
    Hi,
    If a person goes and successfully obtains additional education, whether it's a diploma or certification, they should be financially compensated for their efforts. What the employers I'm familiar with do is offer tuition reimbursement which covers some or most of the cost of attending school for those who have been employed for a certain length of time. What is not offered, in many cases, is a position or project that is commensurate with the degree or certification obtained.

    As other posters have indicated, one of the issues that has not been resolved is that of educational levels. All RNs take the same state board, where as allied health practitioners take different boards depending on their educational levels. There are even some differences between medical doctors and doctors of osteopathy even though practitioners from either program are licensed as physicians. In addition, external pressure from hospital associations and some physician groups help nurses stay in the box and in internal conflict.
  5. by   Kyshine1
    Laura,

    You're very right about the "grandfathered" part of my statement, but I think 20+ years experience have got to count for something!
  6. by   lita1857
    ok here goes...I think for professional respect(AKA money) we as a profession make our entry standard a 4yr degree of some related base..I'm not sure what to do for years of experience???as the difference between RN/ LPN...I'm sure state to state there are differeces in what an LPN is allowed to do...here in NY the nurse practice acts state "assessment as something an LPN can not do as in "triage" I believe it's the level of education plus the thought process in the body system functions that makes move through "levels" of nursing. And just for the record I have great friends who are LPN's who I respect, listen to, learn from etc.
  7. by   TRN
    Well, I have a question. The LPN's and RN's in my hospital do almost the same thing. Do you think the LPN pay should be the same as an RN? They have a FEW things they cannot do, but not much.
  8. by   jlb
    In response to this statement...
    Well, I have a question. The LPN's and RN's in my hospital do almost the same thing. Do you think the LPN pay should be the same as an RN? They have a FEW things they cannot do, but not much.

    ...I have to ask:
    Are you implying that the difference between and LPN and RN is the hospital job description?

  9. by   TRN
    I'm not sure I understand your question. Can you clarify what you are asking please?
  10. by   goldilocksrn
    There is a big difference in the jobs of an RN and an LVN (LPN). LVNs perform tasks-start IV's, perform partial simple assessments. RNs are expected to coordinate multidisciplinary care, critically think, interact more intricately with physicians, and assure that the plan of care is followed. This whole discussion was started because there is a difference in types of nurses (LVNs, ADNs, BSNs). Of course there should be a pay difference between RNs and LVNs. There probably should be a pay difference for nurses with their BSNs- we should all be honored and rewarded for our further education no matter how much task experience we have.
  11. by   stimpyRN
    I am currently pursing my BSN to MSN to FNP. You better believe I'm doing this to not only advance myself, but to be recognized for my higher education and payed for it. Why do people go on for higher education? Money and recognition, not to mention better job opportunities. If I have spent the time and money too better myself, I want to be recognized for it.
  12. by   robinrn
    Why is it in any other profession the person with a higher degree gets more money, but in Nursing...only those under a BSN feels it doesn't matter. I think that anyone who pursues a higher degree should be paid well for it. It's a matter of choices. I feel I should not be punished b/c someone did not choose to educate themselves higher. I am very proud that I am a BSN and am going back for more education. Those who complain so much about it should stop spending their time complaining and go back to school!!!!
  13. by   goldilocksrn
    I agree . I feel that BSNs should be pay more. I'm not saying that BSNs are better nurses, just more formally educated. We should be showing potential people thinking of going into the nursing profession that their efforts are going to be rewarded.

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